PBS: American Masters: Garry Winogrand: All Things are Photographable (video – regional restrictions apply)

https://www.pbs.org/video/garry-winogrand-all-things-are-photographable-tdq83s/

“Discover the life and work of Garry Winogrand, the epic storyteller in pictures who harnessed the serendipity of the streets to capture the American 1960s-70s. His “snapshot aesthetic” is now the universal language of contemporary image-making. …”

Leica Q (Typ 116) digital camera with 24.2 megapixel 35mm sensor and Leica Summilux 28mm f/1.7 Aspheric lens, perfectly suited to the snapshot aesthetic.

Commentary

American documentary photographer Garry Winogrand was called “the central photographer of his generation” by photography curator, historian, and critic John Szarkowski and this documentary movie  provides some insights into how and why he earned that accolade.

Winogrand was a key member of the generation that established the snapshot aesthetic as applied to photography in public as a genre in its own right, alongside Joel Meyerowitz, Lee Friedlander, Tony Ray-Jones and others, all relying on Leica M-Series rangefinder cameras and often the 28mm focal length.

Now that street photography has become even more established as a genre and in some manifestations as a cult, practitioners would do well to study its beginnings at the hands of artists like Winogrand and his colleagues back in the 1960s and 1970s, starting with Garry Winogrand: All Things are Photographable.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links below and purchasing through them or our affiliate accounts at B&H Photo Video, SmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

  • LeicaB&H
Advertisements

Three Blind Men and An Elephant Productions: I’m Already Calling It: The GH5 is 2017 Camera of the Year

“After plunking down my own hard cash and then using it extensively over the last four months, it’s clear to me that the GH5 is peerless for what it does and will not be superseded by any other camera this year. But your mileage may vary. Take a look….”

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on these affiliate links helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled: Stories of Creativity, Innovation, Success’.

Camera, Kits, Battery Grip and V-Log L

  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera (Body Only)B&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera with 8-18mm Lens KitB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera with 12-35mm Lens Kit – B&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera with 12-60mm LensB&H
  • Panasonic DMW-BGGH5 Battery Grip – B&H
  • Panasonic V-Log L Function Activation Code for DMC-GH4, DC-GH5, and DMC-FZ2500B&H

SDXC V90 cards

  • Angelbird 64GB AV Pro UHS-II V90 SDXC Memory CardB&H
  • Angelbird 128GB AV Pro UHS-II V90 SDXC Memory CardB&H
  • Panasonic 128GB UHS-II V90 SDXC Memory CardB&H

L-Plates

  • Really Right Stuff L-Plate Set for Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 Camera Body  – B&H

Camera Cages

  • Movcam Cage for Panasonic GH5B&H
  • Movcam Cage Kit for Panasonic GH5B&H
  • Seercam GH5 CageB&H
  • Seercam Cage for GH5 with Classic HandleB&H
  • Seercam Extension Kit for CUBE GH5 CageB&H

fcp.co: Off the Tracks – A Documentary About How Final Cut Pro X is Disrupting the Post Production Industry

http://www.fcp.co/final-cut-pro/articles/1966-off-the-tracks-a-documentary-about-how-final-cut-pro-x-is-disrupting-the-post-production-industry

Competitions: RØDE Microphones’ My RØDE Reel 2017 and Zacuto’s My Story Filmmaking Competition

There are three short film competitions to watch out for each year and two of them hail from this part of the planet, The Antipodes. Two are current, RØDE Microphones‘ My Røde Reel and Zacuto‘s My Story Film Competition, with the latter closing acceptance of entries on 31st March and the former closing entries acceptance on 30th June. 

New Zealand colour grading software maker FilmConvert‘s Color Up Competition is in between seasons right now, as it were, with 2017’s coming later in the year. Time flies so I am sharing details here so you can be ready for when comp time comes around.

RØDE Microphone’s My RØDE Reel

Click the image above to go to the competition web page.

All three competitions come with great lists of attractive movie-industry prizes and sponsors, with RØDE Microphones stating that My RØDE Reel, now in its fourth year, “is the world’s largest short film competition”.

My RØDE Reel is also notable in that it offers a special Female Filmmaker award that is “selected by the judging panel, [and] is designed to encourage and celebrate women in the film community.”

I will leave it up to the three companies to share the details about each competition as only they can so if you wish to know more, please click on the links embedded in the text above or the links below.

Links:

Image Credits:

Header image concept and design by Carmel D. Morris.

No Panasonic Lumix GH5 Hands-On Tours Where You Live? Watch PhotoJoseph’s Excellent GH5 Videos Instead!

GH5 Sample Footage No. 5; Slow Motion, 2160p @ 60fpsI continue to read about hands-on tours and launch events elsewhere in the world for the exciting new Panasonic Lumix GH5 Super 16/Micro Four Thirds mirrorless hybrid stills/video camera but there is no sign we will be seeing anything like that happening here in Sydney anytime soon. So, what to do? Watch videos about the GH5, that’s what! 

panasonic_lumix_gh5_splashproof_square_1920px

Joseph Linaschke aka PhotoJoseph of PhotoJoseph Studios in Ashland, Oregon, is sharing a number of videos about the GH5 at his YouTube.com channel and I am posting them here for your watching convenience.

I have a GH5… wanna see?

Behind The Scenes With The GH5! | Photo Joseph’s Photo Moment 2017-2-15

LUMIX GH5 with Sean Robinson from Panasonic — A Conversation with PhotoJoseph

LUMIX GH5 Extended Interview with Panasonic’s Sean Robinson, Part 2 A

LUMIX GH5 Extended Interview with Panasonic’s Sean Robinson, Part 2 B

LUMIX GH5 Extended Interview with Panasonic’s Sean Robinson, Part 2 C

LUMIX GH5 Extended Interview with Panasonic’s Sean Robinson, Part 2 D

Who wants to see the GH5 menu system? We go through the CAMERA settings and that’s it

GH5 Menu system explored, part 2

More GH5 info from the LUMIX Luminary Summit — PhotoJoseph’s Photo Moment 2017-02-22

GH5 Autofocus System Explained! — PhotoJoseph’s Photo Moment 2017-02-21

GH5 Sample Footage No. 1; Follow Focus in UHD 60p

GH5 Sample Footage No. 2; Follow Focus for Stills & 6K Photo

GH5 Sample Footage No. 3; Low Light Video & Stills

GH5 Sample Footage No. 4; Slow Motion, 1080p @ 180fps

GH5 Sample Footage No. 5; Slow Motion, 2160p @ 60fps

GH5 Sample Footage No. 6; Focus Transitions

GH5 Bit Depth Difference Electronic vs Mechanical Shutter? | PhotoJoseph’s Photo Moment 2017-03-01

Response to Cinema5D GH5 Criticism | PhotoJoseph’s Photo Moment 2017-03-02

Image Credit:

Header image by Carmel D. Morris.

Tech Notes:

Hero image of the GH5 processed in Macphun Luminar using the Magical Moments preset in the Vivid Wonderland presets pack.

Fujifilm Adds Australian Photographer Gary Heery to its ‘GFX Challenges’ GFX 50S Medium Format Camera Video Lineup

Fujifilm has yet to feature its very first female photographer in its GFX Challenges short video series, as I previously mentioned in another news item here, Fujifilm Heralds Coming GFX 50S with ‘GFX Challenges’ Video Series, Plus More, but the innovative Japanese camera company has just added its very first Australian photographer to the GFX Challenges photographer lineup. 

That Australian photographer is formerly LA-located, now Sydney-based, celebrity portraitist Gary Heery, and I cannot thank Fujifilm enough for making my day with this. Now for the first female photographer to be featured in GFX Challenges!

Recommended Links:

Fujifilm Heralds Coming GFX 50S with ‘GFX Challenges’ Video Series, Plus More

Fujifilm announced the development of its new digital medium format GFX system back in September 2016 with the promise that the “Fujifilm GFX 50S  will give professional photographers the most extraordinary image quality in the history of Fujifilm”. 

Time is rushing by and the first quarter of 2017 will soon commence, during when we can expect the release of the Fujifilm GFX 50S camera with 43.8 x 32.9mm 51.4 megapixel non-X-Trans sensor and three lenses initially with three more to came later in the year.

The first three GF lenses are:

composite_63_zoom_120_1920px
From left, not to scale: GF63mmF2.8 R WR, GF32-64mmF4 R LM WR and GF120mmF4 Macro R LM OIS WR.
  • GF63mmF2.8 R WR – standard prime lens equivalent to 50mm in the 35mm format.
  • GF32-64mmF4 R LM WR –  wide-to-standard zoom lens equivalent to 25 to 51mm in 35mm format.
  • GF120mmF4 Macro R LM OIS WR – stabilized mid-telephoto macro prime lens equivalent to 95mm in 35mm format.

The next three GF lenses will be:

composite_23_45_110_1920px
From left, not to scale: GF23mmF4 LM WR, GF45mmF2.8 R WR and GF110mmF2 R LM WR.
  • GF23mmF4 R LM WR – ultra-wide prime lens equivalent to 18mm in 35mm format.
  • GF45mmF2.8 R WR – wide-angle prime lens equivalent to 35mm in 35mm format.
  • GF110mmF2 R LM WR – wide aperture mid-telephoto prime lens equivalent to 87mm in 35mm format.

Bernd Ritschel

Claire Rosen

Gary Heery

Hiroshi Nonami

Itaru Hirama

Ivan Joshua Loh

Jan Gonzales

Jonas Dyhr Rask

Knut Koivisto

Lito Sy

Lucio Romano

Minoru Kobayashi

Natan Sans

Pål Laukli

Per-Anders Jörgensen

Philipp Rathmer

Philippe Marinig

Piet Van den Eynde

Romeo Balancourt

Sangsun Ogh

Satoshi Minakawa

Seiichi Nakmura

Serkan Günes

Shiro Hagihara

Supalerk Narubetkraisee

Victor Liu

Victoria Wright

Wayne Johns

Yinghui Wu

FUJIFILMglobal –Development of Professional-use Mirrorless Camera System “GFX” / FUJIFILM

Fujifilm’s History of Photographic Achievement

Fujifilm has a long history of achievements and innovations in the photographic sphere and especially in medium and large format photography.

Richard Avedon was a devotee of Fujifilm’s large format lenses for his 8″x10″ sheet film cameras and Greg Gorman relied on the Fujifilm GX 680 series as his main studio portrait cameras for some years.

Fujifilm’s dedication to medium format has been evident from its first 120 format camera, the Fujica Six, through the Fujica G690, Fujica GS645 series, the amazing Fuji Panorama G617 Professional, the Fujica GS645 Professional series, the Fujica GA645 Professional and the SLR-style Fujica GX680 series with camera movements and bellows. Other highlights along the way were the Fujica GW690 and related 120 rangefinder models.

I once spotted the great German-Australian photographer Helmut Newton toting a Fujica GS645 Professional on his way to a magazine portrait assignment and fell in love with that camera for the purpose, an unrequited love affair alas, as it was with other Fujica cameras due to them being hard to get outside of Japan.

Then Fujifilm switched over to digital-only camera and lens manufacturing, though I recall seeing a pair of Fujica GF670 series 120 roll film cameras – a folding GF670 with standard lens and a GF670W – at a trade show in Sydney before the Convention and Exhibition Centre was knocked down for redevelopment that has only just been completed.

I hope that the big photography and video production trade shows will be coming back to the new International Convention Centre Sydney in Darling Harbour soon – it has been far too long without them.

Camera and Lens Choices

As a magazine editorial portrait photographer, I relied on medium and large format cameras for the way they caused my subjects to quickly settle down and and start projecting to the reader via the camera and lens. That was very different to how they related to 35mm rangefinder cameras and different again to 35mm SLR cameras the few times I used them on assignment.

Just before stepping out of professional photography for a time due to extreme photochemical allergies, I had planned on rationalizing my gear with Fujica 6×4.5cm 120 roll film cameras and the GX680. A GX680 III might have been a good choice with which to enter the digital age as Fuji later introduced a digital back, the DBP for GX680, though that was reportedly only available in Japan.

The GX680 series was celebrated for its big range of top notch lenses, 17 in all with one of them a zoom lens, as well as an even larger range of accessories. Lucky owners reported that their experience of the GX680 was a little like using a small view camera, a little like using a 120 format SLR and a little like using a motor drive SLR.

From what little I have seen of using the GFX 50S, its user experience seems like something of a hybrid too, given its fealty to Fujifilm’s X-Series cameras and lenses and even, perhaps, aspects of the FinePix S5 Pro and its S-Series predecessors. We will learn more soon and I am hoping Fujifilm Australia will host a GFX 50S launch event similar to its X-T2 event earlier this year to enable some hands-on experience.

Back to my editorial portraiture experience. I would often be lucky to get not much more than fifteen minutes to meet, greet, assess, set up, light, shoot then pack up for a typical portrait session. That was a product of expectations created by other magazine and newspaper photographers’ typical modus operandi, and client requirements of three to five such assignments per day.

The challenge was to come up with enduring, insightful portraits of two basic types, a landscape aka horizontal format environmental portrait and an intense vertical format full-face portrait. If time allowed I would grab more candid shots with my Leicas. My clients rarely needed more than those two types of portraits, though, one for the article intro and often full-page and the other in the body of the article.  I like some focal lengths for 1:1, prefer others for 4:3 and 3:2, and others again for 16:9.

I used a medium wide angle lens for the environmental portrait, lens stopped down for detail and camera mounted on a tripod. A medium long telephoto macro lens was perfect for the emotionally-engaging full-face portrait. I usually carried a three-light flash kit but substituted it with a single continuous light when needing to shoot in 35mm only.

Looking at Fujifilm’s 2017 GF-Series lens list, of the three to be released in the first part of the year I would choose the GF 120mm f/4 R LM OIS WR and the GF 32-64mm f/4 R LM WR.

The 120mm’s OIS is a real bonus for handholding close and framing tight under continuous light. The 32-64mm’s wide to standard focal range provides framing choices in tight interiors. I would stop both lenses down to f/5.6 as a matter of course, and more again with the wide end of the zoom lens for even more environmental detail if needed.

Out of the three lenses to be released mid to late 2017, the faster lenses look interesting. But, so much hinges on how the camera handles, what configuration works best for what sorts of subject matter and which genres, whether it will be handheld or tripod-mounted, and whether it will be used in available light, continuous artificial light or flash and even what aspect ratio one is shooting for.

Time will tell. Meanwhile I have fingers crossed that one of the rental studios around here may consider adding a full Fujifilm GFX 50S camera and lens kit to their equipment hire inventory.

Raw Processing and Image Editing

Right now it is impossible to predict if and when software companies making raw processors and raw-savvy image editing software will begin supporting the Fujifilm GFX 50S.

But one thing is almost guaranteed, Fujifilm will be supplying an updated version of its Raw File Convertor aka RFC software “powered by SilkyPix” as soon as the GFX 50S is released and it will be available to download and use for free.

RFC is a special edition version of a product by Ichikawa Soft Laboratory Co. Ltd, made in two regular versions, SilkyPix Developer Studio 7 and Developer Studio Pro 7. Having used neither of these the precise differences between RFC, Studio 7 and Studio Pro 7 are unclear to me but RFC is enough for my purposes given I use other raw processors and image editors as well.

Complaining about RFC is almost a cliché in the online world, and while it is true that its user interface is unlike most others’, it is reliable and powerful.

Due to Fujifilm’s special relationship with Ichikawa Soft Laboratory, RFC will always be updated to handle each new Fujifilm camera’s raw files and it will always have Fujifilm’s proprietary raw demosaicing algorithms built in.

Adam Bonn has published an excellent multi-part series of articles on how to get the best out of Raw File Convertor, starting at How to Use the Fujifilm RFC Raw Convertor: Part One.

Where are the Fujifilm-Using Girls?

So far the ‘GFX Challenges’ series numbers sixteen videos and I hope that more are to come, especially some featuring female photographers.

Female professional photographers are just as likely to use medium format digital camera systems as non-female pro photographers, as I can personally attest having been a professional magazine photographer as well as photography client commissioning many of the finest female and non-female photographers in the world to shoot for advertising campaigns and magazines.

Non-Australian female photographers visibly working at the top end of photography had a major effect on my decision to take up professional photography in an era when women were almost completely unknown as pro photographers here.

It was one of those then incredibly rare Australian female professionals who recruited me as a teenager into working for a wedding and portrait studio, using big, heavy, clunky analog medium format cameras and big flash units, and it was another Australian female photographer who showed me that the same subject matter could be brilliantly tackled in a different way with 35mm analog rangefinder cameras.

I owe both those Australians a debt I can never repay, and I owe the same to the great female photographers around the world who inspired me, with whom I have worked, commissioned, produced or about whom I have written.

I hope that, some day very soon, all camera and photography hardware and software companies will recognize the crucial contribution female photographers have made and continue to make to the art and craft of photography by adding equal numbers of women to their professional and ambassadorial ranks.

I cannot help but note that Fujifilm, for example, currently includes only one female photographer in its 18-strong Australian X-Photographers line-up. Surely there is more than one qualified Australian woman using Fujifilm cameras?

Postscript:

As of January 26, 2017, Fujifilm has released 30 GFX Challenges videos via its FUJIFILMGlobal YouTube channel, 28 of which feature male photographers and 2 of which feature female photographers.

Billy Luong, manager for Fujifilm’s Technical Marketing and Product Specialist Group, shared that: “With the GFX we had something like 50 photographers around the world using pre-production cameras.”

Does this mean that there may be more than 2 female photographers in that group?

The issue of the low inclusion and poor representation of women in the creative industries is a crucial and ongoing one. As the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media‘s excellent motto goes:

If she can see it, she can be it.

Female photographers need vastly improved inclusion and representation in photography and video industry marketing efforts. A male to female ratio of 14:1 in this instance must be improved upon.

Consider the message that such a low female inclusion rate sends.

Further reading:

Image Credits:

Header image by Carmel D. Morris.