Press Release: Two Weeks until My RØDE Reel Entries Close, $1 Million in Cash to be Won!

– FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE – 

TWO WEEKS UNTIL
MY RØDE REEL ENTRIES CLOSE

$1 MILLION IN CASH TO BE WON!

SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA: Wednesday, 23 September 2020

There are just two weeks left until entries for My RØDE Reel close, and with it, the chance for filmmakers to win a share of $1 million in cash. The competition closes at 12PM Wednesday, October 7.

My RØDE Reel is the World’s Largest Short Film Competition. Over the last six years, more than 16,000 films have been submitted to the competition from 94 different countries, with RØDE awarding over $3.5 million in prizes to both emerging and established filmmakers. My RØDE Reel has launched hundreds of careers through providing a global platform for filmmakers to gain exposure, offering grants and scholarships, and giving away tonnes of RØDE microphones and filmmaking gear.

My RØDE Reel marked a new milestone when it launched its 2020 edition in July, announcing that the top films would win a share of US $1 million in cash – the biggest cash prize ever offered in a short film competition.

This includes a life-changing $200,000 major prize, which will be awarded to the best film as chosen by the three judges: actor Meyne Wyatt, director Selina Miles, and filmmaker Ryan Connolly.

In addition to the Judges’ Choice, there are nine categories: five genre categories – Drama, Comedy, Action, Documentary, Animation and Behind-The-Scenes – and four special categories – People’s Choice, Sound Design, Young Filmmaker, and Best Chinese Film. The top three films for each category will receive a cash prize – all-in-all, 28 filmmakers will win a share in the money.

As well as the incredible cash prize pool, RØDE is giving away a prize pack to the winners of the 10 categories. These are loaded with gear from the world’s leading filmmaking brands, including Lumix, Nanlite, Zhiyun, MZed, Musicbed, Rhino, Adobe, Brevite, Pelican, Arri and, of course, RØDE microphones and accessories.

Combined with the cash, this brings the total prize pool to over $1.5 million, by far the biggest offering from any short film competition.

Visit the My RØDE Reel website for more information on the prizes and categories.

HOW TO ENTER

Entering My RØDE Reel is easy:

  • Head to myrodereel.com and log in or sign up for an account to access the starter pack. This contains the My RØDE Reel title card, which must feature at the start of your film.
  • Make a 3-minute short film. The brief is completely open – use the different categories to inspire the direction of your film.
  • Make a 3-minute behind-the-scenes (BTS) film, which must feature a RØDE product.
  • Upload your short film and BTS film to YouTube, then submit this link to myrodereel.com.
  • Share your film for a chance to win a People’s Choice Prize.

For the full details on how to enter, head to myrodereel.com and log in or sign up for an account. This contains the starter pack, information on the competition, freebies, tips, inspiration and more.

Entries are open now and close at 12PM (AEDT/GMT+10) Wednesday, October 7, 2020. Head to myrodereel.com for more info.

–ENDS–

About My RØDE Reel:
My RØDE Reel was launched by RØDE Microphones in 2014 as a celebration of excellence in filmmaking and to provide a platform for filmmakers to reach a global audience and win incredible prizes to further their career. Since its inaugural edition, the competition has seen over 16,000 entries submitted from more than 90 countries, collectively being watched over 17 million times. More than $3.5 million in prizes have been awarded to both emerging and established filmmakers including gear, scholarships and grants, and many past entrants have gone on to establish impressive careers in the industry. Today, My RØDE Reel is the World’s Largest Short Film Competition and a highly anticipated calendar event for the global filmmaking community.

About RØDE Microphones and The Freedman Group:
RØDE Microphones (www.rode.com) designs and manufactures high-quality microphones and related accessories for studio, live and location use. Its products are designed and primarily manufactured in Sydney, Australia and exported to 118 countries globally. RØDE is part of The Freedman Group, with APHEX, Event and SoundField. Freedman Electronics celebrated its 50th anniversary in 2017.

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Prizes, My RØDE Reel 2020. Image courtesy of RØDE Microphones.

Links

Canon’s Chickens Come Home To Roost With Crippled Canon EOS R5 Flagship 8K 35mm Sensor-Equipped Mirrorless Stills & Video Hybrid Camera

Given the trials and tribulations of living in lockdown for the past few months I have not been following the release of Canon’s EOS R5 and EOS R6 mirrorless hybrid cameras as closely as I should have. Apologies, so here is a catch-up.

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Canon EOS R5 flagship mirrorless hybrid stills and video digital camera with Canon RF 24-105mm f/4.0 L IS USM zoom lens. Image courtesy of Canon via B&H.

My lockdown-born distance from recent digital developments suddenly changed when I came across a rather shocking Instagram post by camera accessories company Tilta featuring its Tiltaing Cooling Camera Cage for Canon R5, featuring its Canon EOS R5 Cooling Kit, a fan-driven and heavily-finned device designed, apparently, to rapidly reduce the camera’s temperature to one that makes it a little more usable.

Camera accessories maker SmallRig also appears to be working on a solution for the Canon EOS R5 and R6 cameras’ overheating problems, a Cool Cage for R5, and the company may take a different approach to that of Tilta.

Time will tell just as it will as to the actual usability of the R5 and R6 for their designed purposes, but for now enough camera reviewers with a professional background have shed whatever Canon fanboy tendencies they might still harbour in order to share some of the many problems they have been having with both cameras.

Canon EOS R5

Images courtesy of Canon via B&H.

Canon describes the R6 as having “… four times the detail of 4K” making it “the world’s first interchangeable lens digital camera with 8K movies” and the specs for the R5 and R6 certainly look impressive.

But, given the comments I have been reading from credible reviewers like Philip Bloom, Gerald Undone, Andrew Reid and Matthew Allard, the R5 and possibly the R6 appear to be major fails that may lead to class action lawsuits against Canon given the R5 at least does not live up to its marketing claims.

Canon EOS R6

Images courtesy of Canon via B&H.

Might Canon fanboys be better off with the R6 just as a stills photography camera given it is slightly cheaper than the R5?

Tilta Tiltaing Cooling Kit for Canon EOS R5

Images courtesy of Tilta.

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You know what the most annoying thing about the Canon R5 is? It’s that if it didn’t have these ridiculous issues it would be such an amazing camera. This is the first camera I have used in memory that punishes you for using it. Shoot stills then down goes your ability to shoot video in all but the basic line skipped normal speed mode. It is capable of utterly stunning images but there is absolutely no way this could ever be used as a hybrid camera, which it is marketed as, unless you are willing to live with the basic video mode. After shooting about 15 minutes of 8k (just basic IPB mode not raw) today spread out over an hour and then leaving camera off for 90 minutes I was never able to get the 8K option back, nor the 4K 120p, not the 4K HQ and not even line skipped 4K 50p! Basically if you want to use the good video modes use them first, don’t think shooting line skipped means you can use them later. Everything you do reduces the amount of time you can use those modes I mentioned above. The only time you can get the max amount is when you first turn on the camera. Please don’t tell me to use an external recorder. They should be used to bring new features to your camera not because your camera won’t let you record internally anymore as you’ve “shot too much”! I love the form factor of the small body especially for handheld. An external recorder would kill this. I love the stills, I love the video quality in the 8K and HQ mode. I love the animal video autofocus BUT I loathe being unable to use my camera as I want to most of the time. Please don’t accuse me of bias. I have none. I love Canon and have a lot of history with them. I spent £4200 on a camera I cannot use most of the time and that’s ludicrous! I truly hope they find a way to fix this debacle.

A post shared by Philip Bloom (@philipbloom) on

In his Facebook post on the EOS R5, Philip Bloom adds:

Please don’t accuse me of bias. I have none. I love Canon and have a lot of history with them. I spent £4200 on a camera I cannot use most of the time and that’s ludicrous! I truly hope they find a way to fix this debacle.

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You either love it or hate it. Canon EF 24-105mm f/4.0 L IS USM zoom lens, prone to the all-too-common aperture control ribbon cable failure.

Unlike Mr Bloom, I do not love Canon and nor do I have a lot of history with the brand’s products.

My first Canon camera was the once revolutionary but even-then crippled EOS 5D Mark II which was initially only available in a kit with the Canon EF 24-105mm f/4.0 L IS USM zoom lens.

From the start there was a problem with the 5D Mark II, its erase button remaining pushed in after first attempt at using the camera so it went straight back to Canon Australia and eventually returned with the button repaired under warranty.

A straight-out replacement would have been a better option.

Then, just after the warranty for camera and lens expired, the 24-105mm kit zoom lens failed spectacularly and I have still not been able to have it restored to working order.

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Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4.0 L IS USM kit zoom lens.

Despite urgings by my BFF to get rid of my 5D Mark II, I have kept it despite not having a working Canon EF lens for it, instead occasionally using it with a couple of adapted M42 manual focus lenses via a Gobe M42 to EF adapter.

My beloved late uncle Brian Bell aka Sir Brian Ernest Bell CSM, KBE, CStJ, of the Sir Brian Bell Foundation and the Brian Bell Group of Companies, paid for my Canon EOS 5D Mark II and its Canon EF 24-105mm f/4.0 L IS USM zoom lens, and I simply cannot let them go given I barely knew him and yet he proved to be so kind to me and understanding of my situation in his final years alive.

Uncle Brian gave me the 5D Mark II and lens as a gift in order to help me start a new life in photography and video after too many years away from them due to often insurmountable health issues.

At the time I knew nothing about the mirrorless hybrid revolution that was going on at Panasonic and to a lesser degree at Olympus so did not, to my regret, immediately buy into those two company’s Micro Four Thirds system that offered so much more than Canon in terms of affordability and video production capabilities.

Despite my misgivings about Canon’s clear lack of adequate quality control, thus quickly coming to rely instead on Fujifilm, Olympus and Panasonic cameras and lenses, I continued to hope that Canon might eventually see the light and provide the necessary alternative to the smaller sensor-based systems.

So, what a disappointment Canon’s attempt at matching if not surpassing Panasonic’s S-Series cameras has turned out to be, but I should not be surprised given what my BFF has told me about Canon’s research and development efforts before and during the time she worked there in an engineering role.

For fifteen years, apparently, Canon’s Australian R&D division was at the cutting edge of global camera, lens, printing and other technologies and creativity and innovation were anything but dirty words.

Canon had bought an independent Sydney-based R&D company then turned it into the major part of its worldwide product and technology development effort, replete with top engineers, mathematicians, physicists and other scientists and technologists.

Then the suits and the marketing types began taking it all for granted, replacing all this talent with the cult of process engineering, resulting in employees voluntarily departing or being fired en masse to the point where Canon’s R&D division no longer existed.

The scientists and technologists with the genius to solve problems like those apparent in the Canon EOS R5 and R6 were no longer there and, with the company now in the hands of marketing men, this mess is the result.

The chickens that became so apparent in the long years my BFF worked at Canon have finally come to roost, with a vengeance.

The “cripple hammer” described so often by my BFF and increasing numbers of professional customers has found its mark on the cameras that were supposed to firmly establish Canon as a pro-quality force in the mirrorless hybrid realm.

There will be nasty outcomes for Canon from all of this.

For a start, in his latest article at time of writing on the R5, Andrew Reid of EOSHD states that:

If it is proven that Canon purposefully hobbled the camera, or artificially restricted recording times in firmware, with heat as an excuse, in all the highest quality video modes on the EOS R5 they advertised as key headline grabbing features, I will never buy another Canon camera again for as long as I live and I think the full force of consumer law should be brought to bear.

Lastly, here is a comment from my BFF:

“Having worked for over ten years in the Canon research arm (CiSRA) I’ve seen first hand the erosion of innovation, given in to a vast implementation of process engineering.

Contrary to the process engineering activity curve rising sharply, our USPTO patent and innovation curve dived to nearly nothing in the space of three years.

It was all about keeping us engineers heads down with endless vacuous new policies thrown at us, while stifling us with excessive process engineering admin activities such as process management, configuration and release management, excessive performance waterfall adherence and the endless justification to Canon head office that we were worth keeping as a world-class Australian research facility, all the while shedding staff; some of the most brilliant sw and hw engineers, math professors, physicists and other ground-breaking innovators.

The company eventually closed its doors in 2016 after having spent millions moving office space.

In the end, the pointy-headed managers and their cohorts raked in the money while everyone else suffered.

Canon management only have themselves to blame.

Being a Japanese company, the way that female engineers get paid less than male engineers is bad enough, but the way management has destroyed innovation in this company is a crime.”

Links

Press Release: Introducing The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f/5.0-6.3 IS Lens

I remember that the very first time I encountered Micro Four Thirds systems cameras and lenses in a trade show, Olympus was demonstrating just how much smaller and lighter its telephoto zoom lenses were compared those made for so-called “full frame” and “full format” 35mm sensor system cameras. 

This lens, had it been available when that trade show was on, would have been a superb example of why M43 has so much to offer with its 200-800mm focal range in a package the average human being can actually pick up and use without breaking one’s spine and afford without breaking the bank.

Introducing The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f/5.0-6.3 IS Lens

A Superior Compact, Lightweight Super telephoto Zoom Lens Offering, 200-800mm Focal Length (35mm Equivalent)

Center Valley, PA, August 4, 2020 – Olympus® is pleased to announce the M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS lens, an ultra-compact, lightweight super-telephoto zoom lens that covers a broad telephoto focal length of 200-800mm equivalent[1] and is compliant with the Micro Four Thirds® System standard. This lens features the same dustproof and splashproof performance as the M.Zuiko PRO lens series, and when paired with the M.Zuiko Digital 2x Teleconverter MC-20, delivers up to 1600mm equivalent1 super telephoto shooting. This lens offers superior autofocus performance, even handheld, and in-lens image stabilization for the optimal shooting experience.

Compact, Lightweight Design

Despite being a 200-800mm equivalent super telephoto zoom lens, the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS lens is compact and lightweight, with a length of 205.7 mm, a weight of 1,120 g6 and a filter diameter of 72 mm. The M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS lens is capable of 200-800mm equivalent1 telephoto shooting on its own, which can be further extended when paired with the optional (sold separately) M.Zuiko Digital 1.4x Teleconverter MC-14 or the M.Zuiko Digital 2x Teleconverter MC-20, for up to 1600mm equivalent1, making it possible to zoom in close on subjects that are difficult to approach, such as birds and wildlife, and delivering flattening effects for shooting that is unique to a super telephoto lens. The closest focusing distance across the entire zoom range is 1.3m and the maximum image magnification is 0.57×1, allowing superb telemacro performance when photographing small subjects such as insects and flowers. Focus Stacking[2] is also supported. This feature captures multiple shots at different focal positions and automatically composites a single photo with a large depth of field that is in focus from the foreground to background.

Focal length
35mm equivalent

Aperture Value

Max Image Magnification
35mm equivalent

M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 100-400㎜ F5.0-6.3 IS

200mm-800mm
(100mm-400mm)

F5.0-F6.3

X0.57
(X0.29)

With 1.4x Teleconverter MC-14

280mm-1,120mm
(140mm-560mm)

F7.1-F9.0

X0.81
(x0.4)

With 2.0x Teleconverter MC-20

400mm-1600mm
(200mm-800mm)

F10-F13

X1.15
(x0.57)

Superb Performance

The optical system of the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS lens features a combination of four ED lenses[3] for suppressing color bleeding, two Super HR lenses[4], and two HR lenses[5] for bright, clear depictive performance to the edges of the image across the entire zoom range. ZERO (Zuiko Extra-low Reflection Optical) Coating is used to reduce ghosting and flaring, for clear image quality, even in poor, backlit conditions. Extensive hermetic sealing on the entire lens barrel delivers the same high level of dustproof and splashproof performance as the M.Zuiko PRO series for peace of mind when shooting in any environment.

Superior Autofocus

A rear focus system is employed to drive this lightweight focusing lens, for fast, high-precision autofocus performance. This lens is also equipped with four functional switches, designed to support handheld shooting, including a Focus Limiter switch for AF operation selection, ranging between three levels, according to the focusing distance, allowing for quick focusing and comfortable shooting, even in the super telephoto range. In-lens image stabilization on/off delivers stable handheld super telephoto shooting, an AF/MF switch and a zoom locking switch.

Pricing, Availability & Specifications

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400 f5.0-6.3 IS lens will be available for $1,499.99 (U.S.)/$2,199.99 (CAD). To pre-order, visit a participating local authorized retailer, or http://www.getolympus.com. Shipping will begin September 8, 2020. Please visit the website for detailed product specifications: https://www.getolympus.com/lenses/m-zuiko-digital-ed-100-400mm-f5-0-6-3-is.html.

Journalists who are interested in more information or review units should contact Jennifer Colucci, Olympus America Inc., jennifer.colucci@olympus.com, 484-896-5719, or visit the Olympus website getolympus.com.

Bundled Accessories

Lens Hood: LH-76D
Lens Cap: LC-72D

Separately Available Accessories

Lens Hood: LH-76D (Bundled) $39.99 (U.S.)/$54.99 (CAD)
Protect Filter: ZUIKO PRF-ZD72 PRO $79.99 (U.S.)/$107.99 (CAD)
Decoration Ring: DR-79 $24.99 (U.S.)/$24.99 (CAD)
Lens Case: LSC-1127 $44.99 (U.S.)/$44.99 (CAD)

ABOUT OLYMPUS AMERICA INC.

Olympus is passionate about the solutions it creates for the medical, life sciences, and industrial equipment industries, as well as cameras and audio products. For more than 100 years, Olympus has focused on making people’s lives healthier, safer and more fulfilling by helping detect, prevent, and treat disease, furthering scientific research, ensuring public safety, and capturing images of the world.

Olympus’ imaging business empowers consumers and professionals alike with innovative digital cameras, lenses, audio recorders, and binoculars. The company’s precision optics and groundbreaking technology open up new possibilities for capturing life’s most precious moments. For more information, visit http://www.getolympus.com.

All trademarks and registered trademarks listed herein are the property of their respective holders, in the U.S. and/or other countries.

Olympus…True to You. True to Society. True to LIFE.

© 2020 Olympus America Inc.

# # #

1 35mm equivalent
2 Please see the Olympus website for compatible cameras
3 Extra-low Dispersion lens
4 Super High Refractive Index lens
5 High Refractive Index lens
6 Excluding tripod base plate, lens cap, lens rear cap, and lens hood

Links

Press Release: Olympus releases the long-awaited ED 12‑45mm F4 PRO and a video content creation kit with its E-M5 Mark III, New OM-D E-M5 Mark III kits

Olympus appeared to emphasize the  stills photography capabilities of its OM-D range of digital cameras more than their video features. 

I have always had a high opinion of the company’s M.Zuiko Pro professional-quality prime and zoom lens collection most especially due to their manual clutch focus mechanism which is particularly useful for moviemaking. 

Now Olympus appears determined to remind us that their camera also shoot video too, and to demonstrate that fact have released two moviemaking kits, in the UK and Ireland at least if not in the rest of the world. 

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Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III OMD Movie Kit.

Hamburg, 05/15/2020 | Press release | Camera & audio

Olympus releases the long-awaited ED 12‑45mm F4 PRO and a video content creation kit with its E-M5 Mark III
New OM-D E-M5 Mark III kits

A few weeks ago, Olympus launched the world’s most compact and lightweight high-performance standard zoom lens M.Zuiko Digital ED 12‑45mm F4 PRO.* In combination with the also compact and lightweight OM-D E-M5 Mark III camera, unrivalled mobility is now possible. The acclaimed weather-sealing allows for shooting in all conditions. This ideal combination will be available as a kit from mid-May, for all photo enthusiasts looking for professional quality in a handy format. The new OM-D movie kit with the E-M5 Mark III and the LS-P4 audio recorder is ideal for all vloggers, filmmakers and YouTubers who rely on top quality gear and like to travel light. The kit centers around the versatile E-M5 Mark III camera with high-performance autofocus capabilities: a powerful image stabilization system and “OM-D Movie” features, which deliver an extensive array of creative options for filmmakers. Also included are the wide-angle M.Zuiko Digital ED 12mm F2.0 lens and an Olympus LS-P4 linear PCM recorder, to ensure brilliantly clear sound, as well as further accessories to guarantee a worry-free video content creation experience.

At up to half the size and weight of other interchangeable lens systems, Olympus’ biggest advantage is its optimal mobility owing to the compact camera system and lenses. The combination of the high-resolution, high-performance lens line-up and powerful image stabilization results in sharp, high-quality videos and photos for a variety of scenarios.

Packing some of the latest imaging technologies in a highly compact body, the OM-D E-M5 Mark III represents these benefits to the fullest and is therefore the perfect choice for every photo and vlogging enthusiast on the go.

OM-D E-M5 Mark III 12‑45mm F4 PRO kit

One compact and lightweight lens for many possibilities

The optical configuration of the M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-45mm F4.0 PRO lens is inherited from the ED 12-40mm F2.8 PRO lens, which is well recognized for its high-quality standards. Effective placement of special lenses in the M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-45mm F4.0 PRO lens allows for the world’s most compact, lightweight design*, covering a focal length from wide angle 24mm to telephoto 90mm (35mm equivalent). A small and lightweight focusing lens enables high-speed, precise AF for any subject. Aspherical lenses and ZERO (Zuiko Extra-low Reflection Optical) coating drastically reduce aberrations, ghosts, and flares for sharp, high-definition image quality. Suppressing loss of light at the edges of images makes it possible to obtain a bright, clear depictive performance over the entire image.

Superb macro capabilities

The M.Zuiko ED 12-45 mm F4.0 PRO is also suitable for macro photography with a maximum magnification of 0.25x (0.5x 35mm equivalent) across the entire zoom range. The closest focusing distance is 12 cm at the wide-angle end, and 23 cm at the telephoto end. Diverse macro effects are possible, such as Focus Stacking****, which generates a single image in the camera with a large depth of field in focus from the foreground to the background.

The perfect match

The new flexible standard zoom lens is the solution for all those who want to achieve maximum performance with as little equipment as possible. It fits perfectly to the OM-D E-M5 Mark III, which is just as flexible, compact and light. It features a weather-sealed construction, high-performance autofocus capabilities and a powerful image stabilization system, along with versatile shooting features to deliver brilliant image quality and an extensive array of creative options for photographers and filmmakers.

The OM-D movie kit

All video producers know about the importance of sound. The Olympus LS-P4 audio recorder is the perfect match for the E-M5 Mark III and helps creatives to complement their production with Hi-Res audio quality.

Why the Olympus movie kit is the ideal choice for aspiring video content creators

Advanced imaging technology in an ultra-small body and a high-quality wide-angle lens ensure the versatility modern video creators need.

Being one of the most compact and lightweight wide-angle lens kits in its class, the OM-D E-M5 Mark III with the M.Zuiko Digital ED 12mm F2.0 lens can easily be carried everywhere to make sure no video shot is missed.

The camera’s in-body 5-axis image stabilization system ensures that moving images look even clearer and sharper by compensating for unwanted camera-shake.

Olympus’ highly precise 121-point all cross-type on-chip Phase Detection autofocus (AF) system brings out the full potential of the distinguished MSC (Movie & Still Compatible) mechanism, enabling fast and quiet autofocusing in M.Zuiko lenses without “jumping” focus. Thus, the focus in a film scene can no longer be lost, the result: sharp results in almost any situation or environment.

With the E-M5 Mark III’s swivel touch LCD, creatives and vloggers maintain full control of the framing and background as well as quick and easy access to a control panel with the most important settings – even when taking a selfie shot or holding the camera high or low.

Due to the direct and easy connection of the E-M5 Mark III with Olympus’ acclaimed LS-P4 sound recorder, video enthusiasts have the choice to record sound directly onto the movie file and upload it right away, or to combine sound and video in post production. Full compatibility and easy synchronization are guaranteed since both the camera and the audio recorder are genuine Olympus products.

Superior sound makes any movie better: The Olympus LS series ensures crisp, brilliant audio for video

The Olympus LS series is renowned for its compact, sleek design and exceptional sound quality. Offering better-than-CD quality recording allowing for a frequency spectrum of up to 20Hz – 20kHz, the LS-P4 ensures a rich stereophonic sound.

At loud volumes, the capability of handling sound pressure levels (SPL) of up to 120dB without clipping as well as the acclaimed Olympus noise cancelling system come into play.

With a near perfect sampling rate of up to 96 kHz/24-Bit sound PCM, FLAC or MP3 recording***** (and playback), the LS-P4 is a feature-packed high-resolution audio recorder. It brings together high quality of sound with ultimate ease of use and flexibility – making it the ideal companion for video production on the go.

With the new firmware Version 1.10 for the LS-P4, a Slate Tone function has been added to make sound file editing / video synchronization easier, while the new Test Tone feature supports users in adjusting the recording level for optimal results. By using Olympus Workspace Version 1.3 it is easy to replace the audio files of the recorded video to High res sound recorded by using Slate Tone.

An included Joby GorillaPod and further accessories take the versatility and convenience for video creators to the next level

In addition to the E-M5 Mark III camera, the high-quality M.Zuiko Digital ED 12mm F2.0 lens, a metal lens hood to minimize the risk of reduced contrast and flares from sunlight, the Olympus LS-P4 sound recorder and further useful accessories; the new movie kit includes a Joby GorillaPod to place the camera on almost any surface or to support hand-held shooting.

When capturing sound for video, the LS recorder may be used as separate hand-held device or, utilizing the included shock mount adapter (Olympus SM2) and 3.5mm cable (Olympus KA335), as a flexible microphone on top of the camera to save on synchronization efforts in post-production. The included windshield offers protection from wind noises when filming outdoors.

For more information on shooting video content with Olympus cameras and sound recorders please visit www.olympus.eu/video_sound.

Availability & pricing

The new OM-D 12‑45mm F4 PRO kit is available from mid of May at an RRP of 1,599.00 EUR. The OM-D movie kit is available now at an RRP** of 1.999,00 EUR. The included OM-D cameras and M.Zuiko lenses come with a free six-month warranty extension****** when registered via the MyOlympus platform at http://my.olympus.eu.

Selected accessories

The OM-D E-M5 Mark III is fully compatible with Olympus’ extensive range of Micro Four Thirds lenses and accessories, including tailor-made camera bags, electronic flashes and the free image editing and workflow software Olympus Workspace and smartphone app OI.Share.

More information at www.olympus.eu/accessories.

Product specifications are subject to change without notice. Please check the Olympus website at www.olympus-europa.com for the latest specifications.

* As of February 12, 2020. World’s most compact, lightweight standard zoom lens with a constant aperture value.

** Recommended Retail Price

*** With M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm F4.0 IS PRO at a focal distance of f=100mm (35mm equivalent: f=200mm), halfway release image stabilization: Off, frame rate: high speed. CIPA standards compliant on 2 axes (Yaw and Pitch).

**** Supported cameras: OM-D E-M1 Mark III. A firmware update is required for the following camera models: OM-D E-M1X, OM-D E-M1 Mark II, OM-D E-M5 Mark III

***** 96 kHz/24-Bit only possible when recording in PCM or FLAC format.

****** Six months on top of the statutory warranty in the country of purchase.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III OMD Movie Kits with Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-45mm f/4.0 Pro zoom lens

Links

David Thorpe: A Look At The Panasonic G90 Micro Four Thirds Camera

“The Panasonic G90/95 sits between the smaller and cheaper GX9 and their top range G9 and GH5 models. Its predecessor, the (still available) 16Mp G80 met with many accolades. Does the 20Mp G90/95 render obsolete the G80? Or should you skip this one and wait for a G10?”

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Panasonic Lumix DC-G95 with Panasonic Lumix G Vario 12-60mm f/3.5-5.6 Aspheric Power OIS zoom lens and Panasonic DMW-BGG1 Battery Grip.

Commentary

Former Fleet Street newspaper and magazine photographer David Thorpe is one of the best and most quietly-spoken video reviewers of Micro Four Thirds cameras and lenses, lately supplemented with Panasonic’s L-Mount 35mm sensor-equipped mirrorless cameras and lenses, and I cannot recommend his sensible, down-to-earth video reviews highly enough.

I have yet to experience the Panasonic Lumix DC-G95 aka G91 and G90 depending on territory, and so greatly appreciate his thoughts on this value-for-money camera that appears to be an excellent lower-cost alternative to the Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 or GH5.

In my experience, Micro Four Thirds cameras are ideal for immersive documentary and photojournalism work as well as Super 16-style documentary moviemaking, and Panasonic’s high-end and mid-level Lumix cameras are great solutions especially as they appear to be almost invisible to onlookers and subjects more accustomed to 35mm sensor DSLRs, especially if designed with the pro-quality Panasonic Lumix GX8’s size and form factor.

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  • Olympus Micro Four Thirds LensesB&H
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  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-G85 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera with 12-60mm LensB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital CameraB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-G95 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 12-60mm Lens B&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital CameraB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera with 12-60mm LensB&H
  • Panasonic Micro Four Thirds LensesB&H

Richard Wong: Panasonic Leica 10-25 mm f/ 1.7 In-Depth Review

“Panasonic Leica 10-25mm 1.7 is the fastest zoom lens from Panasonic/Leica. How is it’s build quality, image quality (sharpness,vignetting,CA,flare,distortion..etc)? Could this be a great lens for videographers or vloggers? How does it compare to the Leica prime lenses and what are the pros and cons of this lens? We’ll talk about all of these in this review.”

panasonic_leica_dg_vario-summilux_10-25mm_f1.7_aspheric_01_1024px
Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric wide to standard zoom lens.

Links

  • 4/3 RumorsPanasonic Leica 10-25mm f/1.7 In-Depth Review by Richard Wong
  • Photo by RichardPanasonic Leica 10-25mm f/1.7 Review – article – “When Panasonic told me about this lens, they told me this is a lens that can replace multiple prime lenses. I was skeptical because zoom lens rarely can match the quality of prime lens. But after testing this lens, I agree with them. If you are a pro photographer or videographer who is currently rely on multiple prime lenses within this focal length range, I think you should consider switching to this amazing lens. It would make your life a lot easier without sacrificing the image quality.”
  • Richard WongPanasonic Leica 10-25 mm f/ 1.7 In-Depth Review – video

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  • Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 ASPH. LensB&H

DPReview: Fujifilm XF 8-16mm F2.8 WR LM Review (video)

There’s no doubt that the Fujifilm XF 8-16mm F2.8 is a beautifully built lens. It’s also quite heavy, and at £1750 / $1900 it’s a pretty serious investment. Is the expense worth it? Chris and Jordan take to the hiking trails of Alberta to answer that question….

Commentary

Fujifilm’s Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR ultra wide-angle zoom lens is beautifully built and delivers beautiful results, but it may not be the best solution for everyone needing ultra-wide focal lengths.

Its size and weight demand mounting it on a vertical battery-equipped Fujifilm X-T3 at the very least with the now-discounted Fujifilm X-H1 providing better balance than the slightly smaller and lighter X-T3.

If the X-H1’s OIS-equipped replacement, the X-H2, is in Fujifilm’s production pipeline then it may be wiser to wait for that to appear sometime late this year or more likely early next if the Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR is an important lens in your gear kit.

My experience with the XF 8-16mm f/2.8 proves it to be an excellent solution for architectural photography where street furniture, trees and other buildings dictate using the widest focal lengths to get closer to your main subject and bypass non-removable visual noise.

I have used it successfully for documentary photography in the middle of dense crowds, though there were times I would have preferred the lens had optical image stabilization built-in for when the light dropped and slow shutter speeds were necessary to support deep focus via smaller apertures.

In bright sunlight, photographing landscapes was a pleasure and the lens lapped up fine detail but its lack of provision for attaching screw-on filters meant I was unable to try it out as a video lens and I am not in the market for large, heavy and expensive third-party filter adapters or even larger and costlier matte boxes.

If you need an ultra-wideangle for documentary photography and video then I highly recommend the Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R which is small and light enough for use with an ungripped X-T3 and would work well on an X-Pro2 with a Fujifilm VF-X21 external optical viewfinder sitting on its hotshoe.

If a range of wide-angle focal lengths is necessary as well as portability and stabilization then I recommend the Fujinon XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS lens especially it is stopped down below f/5.6 and preferably f/8.0, and this lens will not eat into your savings anywhere near as much as the otherwise excellent Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR.

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  • FUJIFILM VF-X21 External Optical ViewfinderB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-H1 Mirrorless Digital Camera Body with Battery Grip KitB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-T3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM VG-XT3 Vertical Battery GripB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 14mm f/2.8 R LensB&H

DPReview: CP+ 2019: Fujifilm interview – ‘We want to show photographers the future’

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/8410636142/cp-2019-fujifilm-interview-we-want-to-show-photographers-the-future

“At the CP+ show earlier this month in Yokohama Japan, we sat down with senior executives from Fujifilm. During our conversation we covered everything from the upcoming GFX 100, to plans for APS-C and why the X100 still occupies such an important position in the company’s lineup.

Our interview was conducted with three senior executives in Fujifilm’s Electronic Imaging Products Division:

  • Toshi Iida, General Manager.
  • Makoto Oishi, Product Planning Manager.
  • Shin Udono, Senior Manager of the Sales and Marketing Group.…”

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ePHOTOzine: Panasonic Leica DG VARIO-SUMMILUX 10-25mm f/1.7 ASPH Hands-On

https://www.ephotozine.com/article/panasonic-leica-dg-vario-summilux-10-25mm-f-1-7-asph-hands-on-33371

“Panasonic are showing a working version of the new Leica 10-25mm f/1.7 Micro Four Thirds lens, at The Photography Show 2019, at the Birmingham NEC. We had a hands-on look at the new lens, which was first shown, in prototype form, at Photokina 2018. The lens gives the equivalent of 20mm to 50mm, and is lighter than it looks, considering the (large) size of the lens….”

panasonic_leica_dg_vario-summilux_10-25mm_f1.7_01_1024px
Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 zoom lens currently under development. It may prove to be a great primary lens for available light documentary moviemaking and photography on M43-mount cameras including those made by Blackmagic Design, Olympus and Panasonic. Photograph originally published at CVP.com, showing manual clutch focus mechanism in operation. Photographs by Joseph Waller of ePHOTOzine do not show a manual clutch focus mechanism however. So far it is unknown as to whether the mechanism will make it into the final version of t he lens. Double the numbers on the zoom ring for their 35mm equivalents – 20mm, 24mm, 28mm, 36mm and 50mm.

Commentary

olympus_m-zuiko_digital_ed_45mm_f1-2_white_square_upright_clutch_1024px_60.jpg
Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 45mm f/1.2 Pro prime lens with manual clutch focusing via retracting focus control ring. Equivalent to 90mm in the 35mm sensor format. If only ALL lenses offered manual clutch focus!

When I went looking for the best lens for documentary photography and video after I decided to invest in Panasonic’s Lumix Micro Four Thirds camera range, I read about and tried out a number of options including adapted and native prime and zoom lenses.

After narrowing the options down, it was a contest between the Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 12-35mm f/2.8 II Aspheric Power OIS and the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 Pro and, after a lengthy tryout of both lenses, the Olympus zoom lens won hands-down.

The single biggest reason?

The M.Zuiko Pro lens collection’s manual clutch focus mechanism that is activated by retracting the focus-by-wire control ring towards the camera body.

“Pulling focus with focus-by-wire sucks,” as they say in the video industry.

I rapidly obtained critically sharp focus for stills with the M.Zuiko Pro 12-40mm f/2.8 zoom more times than I did with the Panasonic lens’ focusing control ring or the camera’s autofocus functionality, and that capability outweighed the Lumix 12-35mm lens’ rather attractive optical image stabilization.

I still rely on my M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 Pro zoom lens for mission-critical work after having tried out and invested in a number of Lumix prime and zoom lenses, and may well be adding more M.Zuiko Pro primes and zooms in future.

Then news leaked out of Panasonic’s Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 zoom lens being in development, full feature set then unknown as it still is, and things shifted somewhat.

leica_summilux+_lineup_21-90mm_square_1920px_80pc
Leica worked out the best prime lens focal length line-up for documentary photography and photojournalism in 35mm years ago and it remains the benchmark and role model for other lens makers to this very day. The only focal length missing from this lens collection is 40mm, which Leica made for the Leica CL rangefinder camera which was later taken over by Minolta as the Minolta CLE with 40mm standard lens as well as a 28mm and 90mm lens. Too many contemporary lens makers leave out 28mm and 75mm lenses and their equivalents for other sensor formats. Why? Both these focal lengths are amongst the most essential for documentary photography and photojournalism as well as video.

This lens is the closest so far to the ideal zoom lens I had visualized when buying into the Micro Four Thirds system.

I had imagined a lens with a range encompassing every single focal length I rely upon when shooting documentary photographs and video, with the exception of the portrait and big close-up range of 75mm through 85mm and 90mm to 105mm.

Imagine that focal length range in a similarly fast and wide maximum aperture standard-to-telephoto companion zoom lens.

Questions persisted for some time as to whether the Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 would have optical image stabilization and whether it would come with manual clutch focus.

Many professional photographers and videographers have reportedly been asking Panasonic for the latter in new lenses for quite some time now, to no avail.

It is great to finally see a little more of the Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 in Joseph Waller’s photographs for ePHOTOzine of a pre-production version, but there is no mention nor evidence of a manual clutch focus mechanism in the article and its photographs.

I have asked a contact who is attending The Photography Show 2019 in Birmingham to see if she can get hold of the lens and confirm whether or not it actually has the crucial focusing functionality.

Watch this space!

olympus_lens_roadmap_2019-02-13_1920px
Olympus lens roadmap as of February 13, 2019.

Meanwhile I am wondering what Olympus has in store with its most recently updated lens roadmap, especially in regard to the “Wide Zoom” and “Standard Zoom” items, not to forget “Bright Prime Lens” and “Telephoto Zoom Lens” which appears twice.

Imagine all those lenses with the brilliant M.Zuiko Pro manual clutch focus mechanism.

Kiss goodbye to the frustrations of pulling focus via fly-by-wire.

Postscript

My Birmingham contact is pretty sure that the Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7’s aperture ring is declicked.

Now waiting for her to have hands on with the lens and confirm whether there is a manual clutch focus mechanism.

Post-postscript

Photography Blog posts pictorial confirmation that manual clutch focusing has finally come to a Panasonic lens.

Well I think that is evidence enough that Panasonic’s Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 will have manual clutch focusing mechanism and thus accurate and repeatable focus pulling for video.

It will also have the ability to quickly and accurately set hyperfocal distance, a necessity when zone focusing for high-speed forms of documentary or photographing in the street, as well as landscape photography.

Hyperfocal distance can be calculated using online forms or mobile apps, and a number of options can be found online here.

Fully manual focus lenses such as the Leica M-Series rangefinder camera lenses illustrated up this page provide beautifully-etched scales allowing quick calculation of hyperfocal distance, a functionality I often yearn for when photographing in public with digital cameras and lenses.

Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric zoom lens and Lumix DC-G9 camera. Photographed by Joshua Waller for ePHOTOzine.

Whet now remains is for a late pre-production Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric zoom lens to find its way into the hands of professional cinematographers and photographers for extensive testing and reporting on its mechanical and optical quality.

This lens has the potential to replace a range of prime lenses in one’s daily gear kit, in my case the 35mm sensor equivalents of 21mm, 28mm, 35mm, 40mm and 50mm.

Neither Olympus nor Panasonic supply all those focal lengths as prime lenses, though I hope that situation will change in the near future.

The Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric will not be a cheap lens given Panasonic’s ambitions in producing it, but whatever its price on release, it would be wise to compare it to what those five focal lengths might cost as f/1.7 prime lenses.

There are other potential benefits.

Of all the brands of aluminium and brass step-up rings I have tried, those made by Breakthrough Photography have proven to be the best and are unique in their top quality machining and easy-handling traction frame.

The Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric’s filter diameter is 77mm, and I would recommend attaching a Breakthrough Photography 77mm to 82mm knurled brass step-up ring to it for attaching 82mm diameter fixed and variable neutral density filters when shooting video.

Whether the Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric zoom lens is heavy or not, its size would benefit from attaching a vertical battery grip to your camera if it is a Panasonic.

I like most cameras to be equipped with vertical battery grips for added power when shooting video and ease of handholding in portrait photography.

The countdown to NAB 2019 is well advanced and it will be interesting to see if Panasonic shows off mockups of the coming Lumix DC-GH6 hybrid M43 camera.

I am hoping that Panasonic will combine the best of the Lumix DC-GH5 and GH5S in the GH6 while taking into account the challenges presented by the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K, Fujifilm’s X-T3 and X-H1 while bearing in mind the coming X-H2, as well as the 35mm sensor-equipped mirrorless cameras now released by Canon, Nikon, Leica and, indeed, Panasonic itself.

zhiyun-tech_weebill_lab_01_1024px
Zhiyun-Tech Weebill Lab gimbal stabilizer.

While the Super 35 format has its many attractions, the smaller and lighter cameras and lenses of Super 16 moviemaking still allow you to go places where the larger 35mm cameras and lenses can draw undue attention.

The photographs of the 10-25mm f/1.7 lens published by ePHOTOzine and Photography Blog appear to have been shot on mobile phones and optical exaggerations make it hard to accurately judge the lens’ size in relation to the camera or the hands holding them.

Nonetheless, I have no problem with the idea of carrying this one lens about almost permanently attached to any Panasonic M43 camera whether with battery grip or not, or a Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera Camera 4K for that matter, though I would be tempted to consider the Zhiyun-Tech Weebill Lab or Crane 3 Lab as appropriate if stabilization is a necessity when shooting with the BMPCC 4K.

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