Press Release: Introducing The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f/5.0-6.3 IS Lens

I remember that the very first time I encountered Micro Four Thirds systems cameras and lenses in a trade show, Olympus was demonstrating just how much smaller and lighter its telephoto zoom lenses were compared those made for so-called “full frame” and “full format” 35mm sensor system cameras. 

This lens, had it been available when that trade show was on, would have been a superb example of why M43 has so much to offer with its 200-800mm focal range in a package the average human being can actually pick up and use without breaking one’s spine and afford without breaking the bank.

Introducing The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f/5.0-6.3 IS Lens

A Superior Compact, Lightweight Super telephoto Zoom Lens Offering, 200-800mm Focal Length (35mm Equivalent)

Center Valley, PA, August 4, 2020 – Olympus® is pleased to announce the M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS lens, an ultra-compact, lightweight super-telephoto zoom lens that covers a broad telephoto focal length of 200-800mm equivalent[1] and is compliant with the Micro Four Thirds® System standard. This lens features the same dustproof and splashproof performance as the M.Zuiko PRO lens series, and when paired with the M.Zuiko Digital 2x Teleconverter MC-20, delivers up to 1600mm equivalent1 super telephoto shooting. This lens offers superior autofocus performance, even handheld, and in-lens image stabilization for the optimal shooting experience.

Compact, Lightweight Design

Despite being a 200-800mm equivalent super telephoto zoom lens, the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS lens is compact and lightweight, with a length of 205.7 mm, a weight of 1,120 g6 and a filter diameter of 72 mm. The M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS lens is capable of 200-800mm equivalent1 telephoto shooting on its own, which can be further extended when paired with the optional (sold separately) M.Zuiko Digital 1.4x Teleconverter MC-14 or the M.Zuiko Digital 2x Teleconverter MC-20, for up to 1600mm equivalent1, making it possible to zoom in close on subjects that are difficult to approach, such as birds and wildlife, and delivering flattening effects for shooting that is unique to a super telephoto lens. The closest focusing distance across the entire zoom range is 1.3m and the maximum image magnification is 0.57×1, allowing superb telemacro performance when photographing small subjects such as insects and flowers. Focus Stacking[2] is also supported. This feature captures multiple shots at different focal positions and automatically composites a single photo with a large depth of field that is in focus from the foreground to background.

Focal length
35mm equivalent

Aperture Value

Max Image Magnification
35mm equivalent

M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 100-400㎜ F5.0-6.3 IS

200mm-800mm
(100mm-400mm)

F5.0-F6.3

X0.57
(X0.29)

With 1.4x Teleconverter MC-14

280mm-1,120mm
(140mm-560mm)

F7.1-F9.0

X0.81
(x0.4)

With 2.0x Teleconverter MC-20

400mm-1600mm
(200mm-800mm)

F10-F13

X1.15
(x0.57)

Superb Performance

The optical system of the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS lens features a combination of four ED lenses[3] for suppressing color bleeding, two Super HR lenses[4], and two HR lenses[5] for bright, clear depictive performance to the edges of the image across the entire zoom range. ZERO (Zuiko Extra-low Reflection Optical) Coating is used to reduce ghosting and flaring, for clear image quality, even in poor, backlit conditions. Extensive hermetic sealing on the entire lens barrel delivers the same high level of dustproof and splashproof performance as the M.Zuiko PRO series for peace of mind when shooting in any environment.

Superior Autofocus

A rear focus system is employed to drive this lightweight focusing lens, for fast, high-precision autofocus performance. This lens is also equipped with four functional switches, designed to support handheld shooting, including a Focus Limiter switch for AF operation selection, ranging between three levels, according to the focusing distance, allowing for quick focusing and comfortable shooting, even in the super telephoto range. In-lens image stabilization on/off delivers stable handheld super telephoto shooting, an AF/MF switch and a zoom locking switch.

Pricing, Availability & Specifications

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400 f5.0-6.3 IS lens will be available for $1,499.99 (U.S.)/$2,199.99 (CAD). To pre-order, visit a participating local authorized retailer, or http://www.getolympus.com. Shipping will begin September 8, 2020. Please visit the website for detailed product specifications: https://www.getolympus.com/lenses/m-zuiko-digital-ed-100-400mm-f5-0-6-3-is.html.

Journalists who are interested in more information or review units should contact Jennifer Colucci, Olympus America Inc., jennifer.colucci@olympus.com, 484-896-5719, or visit the Olympus website getolympus.com.

Bundled Accessories

Lens Hood: LH-76D
Lens Cap: LC-72D

Separately Available Accessories

Lens Hood: LH-76D (Bundled) $39.99 (U.S.)/$54.99 (CAD)
Protect Filter: ZUIKO PRF-ZD72 PRO $79.99 (U.S.)/$107.99 (CAD)
Decoration Ring: DR-79 $24.99 (U.S.)/$24.99 (CAD)
Lens Case: LSC-1127 $44.99 (U.S.)/$44.99 (CAD)

ABOUT OLYMPUS AMERICA INC.

Olympus is passionate about the solutions it creates for the medical, life sciences, and industrial equipment industries, as well as cameras and audio products. For more than 100 years, Olympus has focused on making people’s lives healthier, safer and more fulfilling by helping detect, prevent, and treat disease, furthering scientific research, ensuring public safety, and capturing images of the world.

Olympus’ imaging business empowers consumers and professionals alike with innovative digital cameras, lenses, audio recorders, and binoculars. The company’s precision optics and groundbreaking technology open up new possibilities for capturing life’s most precious moments. For more information, visit http://www.getolympus.com.

All trademarks and registered trademarks listed herein are the property of their respective holders, in the U.S. and/or other countries.

Olympus…True to You. True to Society. True to LIFE.

© 2020 Olympus America Inc.

# # #

1 35mm equivalent
2 Please see the Olympus website for compatible cameras
3 Extra-low Dispersion lens
4 Super High Refractive Index lens
5 High Refractive Index lens
6 Excluding tripod base plate, lens cap, lens rear cap, and lens hood

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Press Release: Olympus Unveils the Latest M.Zuiko Digital Lens Roadmap and Updates the Development of M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25x IS PRO

Olympus’ M.Zuiko Pro professional-quality lenses for Micro Four Thirds cameras are just one step away from perfect, in my humble opinion. 

The one thing that stops Olympus M. Zuiko Pro lenses from being absolutely perfect is their absence of aperture rings with the option of being set to clicked or de-clicked for stills photography and video respectively. 

I am looking forward to further details emerging about the Olympus M. Zuiko Digital ED 8-25mm f/4.0 Pro wide-angle zoom lens as well as other coming lenses denoted by graphics in the lens roadmap such as “Bright Prime Lenses”. 

Olympus Unveils the Latest M.Zuiko Digital Lens Roadmap and Updates the Development of M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25x IS PRO

Olympus Corporation (President: Yasuo Takeuchi) is pleased to announce the latest lens roadmap for M.Zuiko Digital lenses that conform to the Micro Four Thirds System standard, and provide an update on the development of the M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25x IS PRO lens of which the development was announced in January, 2019.

The development on the M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25x IS PRO lens was announced in January 2019. Development of this lens continues with an estimated scheduled release of this winter. The final image design of the product is now available.

Furthermore, to make super telephoto shooting more convenient, the development is under way to add Bird detection to Intelligent Subject Detection AF on the Olympus OM-D E-M1X. The firmware is scheduled for release this winter.

Olympus will continue enhancing the lens lineup to make full use of the unrivaled portability made possible by the compact, lightweight, high image quality of the Micro Four Thirds System.

News Release Details (PDF: 650.2KB)

Summary of contents

  1. The latest lens roadmap for Olympus M.Zuiko Digital Lens
  2. Updated information of M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25x IS PRO
  3. Development of future firmware upgrade to support Bird detection AF

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Thinking about the The Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7

Contemporary computer-aided lens design has done wonders for zoom lenses since I first tried some out in my Leica rangefinder days on the lovely but lonely Nikon F3 I kept for the times I needed to rent focal lengths outside my core set of Leica M-System prime lenses.

panasonic_leica_dg_vario-summilux_10-25mm_f1.7_01_1024px
Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 zoom lens on Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 Micro Four Thirds camera. Photograph by Joshua Waller of ePHOTOzine.
sony_g_gm_3-zoom_kit_35mm_01_1024px_80pc
The 3-zoom lens kit has long been a staple of photojournalists and especially newspaper photographers for some years. Sony FE 16-35mm f/2.8 GM, Sony FE 70-200mm f/2.8 GM OSS and Sony FE 24-70mm f/2.8 GM lenses.

By the time a backpack containing the standard newspaper photographer’s zoom lens trio was handed to me when I signed up to shoot freelance for one of the large publishers, zoom lenses were considerably improved although I am ashamed to admit that I continued to mostly rely on my own 35mm and 120 roll film rangefinder cameras and 4”x5” view cameras with which I had shaped my way of seeing and photographing over so many years before.

Now that I am no longer answerable to employers and do not have to take on up to three to five editorial portrait assignments per day, delivering stylistically and technically predictable results day in, day out, I can try out other ways and means and develop in new directions.

That includes zoom lenses after relying solely on sets of matched primes for so long.

The first two Micro Four Thirds lenses that I tried out…

The very first lens I tried when considering buying into the Micro Four Thirds camera system was a Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 12-35mm f/2.8 Aspheric Power OIS and the second was an Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 Pro.

I chose the Olympus for several reasons including its brilliant manual clutch focus mechanism, weather-resistant all-metal construction, handy L-Fn button on the camera-left side of the barrel, great feel and balance on a GH4 or a GX8 as I would discover later, and the clincher was its beautiful optical performance all across its longer focal length range wide open and stopped down.

The lens’ only downside is a small amount of moustache-shaped optical distortion that can easily be corrected via firmware for in-camera JPEgs and raw processing software for raw files, with distortion barely noticeable when shooting video.

I did not know that Panasonic’s then soon-to-come DFD autofocus system would apply only to Panasonic lenses and that firmware updates would not add support for the L-Fn button to all Panasonic cameras, and on balance I remain glad I chose the 12-40mm because my bacon has been saved many times due to its swift and sure manual clutch focusing.

olympus_m.zuiko_digital_ed_12-100mm_f4.0_is_pro_06_1024px_60pc
Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4.0 IS Pro, an excellent choice for travel and daily walkabout requiring a longer focal length range than kit and other zoom lenses.

The one thing that might have tipped me towards the 12-35mm is its optical image stabilization, but then Olympus later came out with the OIS-equipped M. Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4.0 IS Pro, and although it does not activate Dual IS 2 when attached to a GH5, its image stabilization works well enough for my needs.

The difference between an f/2.8 and an f/4.0 maximum aperture is not huge when shooting outdoors in good light and I would always pack a wide maximum aperture prime lens to accompany either zoom.

And then with Panasonic’s pre-photokina 2018 in-development announcement of the Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7, the game changed.

The Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7

panasonic_leica_10-25mm_f1.7_zoom_00314329_1920px_80pc
Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 wide angle zoom lens for Micro Four Thirds cameras.

With the lens currently undergoing development and possibly far from release sometime in 2019, the 10-25mm apparently includes some features I have long been hoping for in a Panasonic zoom lens for photography and video.

Here is what we know so far and what I also want to see in this lens:

  • f/1.7 right across the focal length range.
  • An aperture ring that is clickless for accurate exposure under constantly changing light but I would also like it clicked for stills photography without having to look at the lens.
  • 77mm filter diameter for 77mm neutral density filters or a lightweight brass 77mm-to-82mm step-up ring by Breakthrough Photography for 82mm filters.
  • Prime quality performance at all focal lengths.
  • Leica optical and mechanical quality.
  • Some of my favourite and most-needed focal lengths for documentary stills and video – 10.5mm, 14mm, 17.5mm, 20mm and, less often, 25mm. In 35mm sensor terms that equates to 21mm, 28mm, 35mm, 40mm and, less often, 50mm.
  • Alas, no optical image stabilization so when stabilization is a necessity it will need to be used with IBIS camera bodies.
  • Hopefully, improved depth-from-defocus aka DFD in all G, GX and GH cameras’ firmware, DFD being Panasonic’s alternative to the more common PDAF aka phase detection autofocus.

I very much hope that the Panasonic Leica 10-25mm f/1.7 will feature manual clutch focus to support easy focus pulling for video and fast, accurate snapping into sharp focus for photography.

I wonder if a longer companion zoom lens might be in the offing after the release of the 10-25mm?

If so, I would love to see an equally great zoom lens include at least 25mm, 37.5mm, 42.5mm, 45mm and 52.5mm, which in 35mm sensor terms equates to 50mm, 75mm, 85mm, 90mm and 105mm.

A zoom lens pair that goes all the way from 10mm through to 52.5mm, in 35mm equivalent terms 20mm through to 105mm, would fill almost my documentary moviemaking and photography needs.

While I do use longer focal lengths than 105mm in 35mm from time to time, the vast majority of my work is done between 21mm and 85mm with the occasional jump to 100mm or thereabouts.

Leica showed the way with a full set of well-spaced focal lengths…

leica_summilux+_lineup_21-90mm_square_1920px_80pc
Leica worked out the best prime lens focal length line-up for documentary photography and photojournalism in 35mm years ago and it remains the benchmark and role model for other lens makers to this very day. The only focal length missing from this lens collection is 40mm, which Leica made for the Leica CL rangefinder camera which was later taken over by Minolta as the Minolta CLE with 40mm standard lens as well as a 28mm and 90mm lens. Too many contemporary lens makers leave out 28mm and 75mm lenses and their equivalents for other sensor formats. Why? Both these focal lengths are the most essential for documentary photography and photojournalism.

Although I remain dedicated to the idea of having a well-spaced set of pro-quality fast matched prime lenses with manual clutch focus, the reality is that the makers of both M43 systems that I rely on these days, Fujifilm and Panasonic for cameras and Olympus for lenses, may take years to assemble such a lens collection, if ever.

Far better to offer us top-quality zoom lenses that can do almost everything, such as the Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7, so we can get to work without having to pine for prime lenses that may be far off on the horizon or zoom lenses that cover far more focal lengths than we actually need at the cost of undue expense and weight.

I look forward to learning more about Panasonic’s Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 as its development progresses and hope it really will be the zoom lens I was hoping for when I first got into the Micro Four Thirds system for moviemaking and photography.

The Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 would, of course, be a terrific lens for the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K provided you have a gimbal handy for those times when stabilization is a must.

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Panasonic Announces Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 50-200mm f/2.8-4.0 Aspheric Power OIS Telephoto Zoom Lens, H-ES50200

Panasonic has announced the latest lens in its Leica DG Vario-Elmarit zoom lens series, the Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 50-200mm f/2.8-4.0 Aspheric Power OIS “ultra telephoto” according to Panasonic’s parlance, offering the equivalent of 100mm to 400mm in the 35mm sensor format. 

panasonic_leica_dg_vario-elmarit_50-200mm_f2.8-4.0_slant_1024px_60%
Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 50-200mm f/2.8-4.0 Aspheric Power OIS telephoto zoom lens

The addition of the optional DMW-TC14 1.4x teleconverter or DMW-TC20 2.0x teleconverter extends the lens’ default maximum focal length of 200mm to 280mm or 400mm depending on which teleconverter, in 35mm sensor terms equivalent to 560mm or 800mm.

Adding either teleconverter will reduce the lens’ effective aperture due to teleconverter’s light loss effect but at the gain of considerable ultra-telephoto optical reach.

The lens’ Power OIS stabilization works effectively alone on cameras such as the GH5S or more effectively again in conjunction with Dual IS 2-capable in-body stabilized cameras like Panasonic’s G9 or GH5, or previous-generation Dual IS as on the GX8.

The Vario-Elmarit 50-200mm’s focal length range with and without either teleconverter are testimony to the relative affordability, size and weight advantages of the Micro Four Thirds sensor format compared to the price, size and weight of its near-equivalents within the 35mm sensor format camera and lens systems.

Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 50-200mm f/2.8-4.0 Aspheric Power OIS

Commentary

Panasonic’s Leica DG prime and zoom lens series now numbers ten with the addition of the Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 50-200mm f/2.8-4.0 Aspheric Power OIS, making this lens the third Vario-Elmarit f/2.8-4.0 lens in the series.

Panasonic’s expansion of its Leica optics-equipped Leica DG lens range with the Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 50-200mm f/2.8-4.0 Aspheric Power OIS zoom lens is a welcome signal that the company is taking seriously M43’s viability as a professional-quality format for stills photography and moviemaking.

Leica lenses possess certain qualities regardless of the cameras for which they are designed, namely rich, warm colour, high sharpness and high micro-contrast.

That makes them particularly suitable for subjects and genres that benefit from the exposition of fine detail and lush colour like sports and wildlife, although Panasonic’s Lumix G own-brand lens series has some fine qualities such as small size, light weight and lower cost.

All lens designs are compromises to some degree, especially when price, size and weight are factors and the Vario-Elmarit lenses have compromised with variable maximum apertures, each having a maximum aperture of f/2.8 at their wide end and f/4.0 throughout most of their focal length range.

Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 50-200mm f/2.8-4.0 Aspheric Power OIS mounted on Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5, water-splashed to demonstrate weather-sealing on lens and camera.

Accordingly, they are effectively f/4.0 lenses, adding some limitations, in my experience, to their uses under indoors and poor outdoors available light aka available darkness especially when shooting video.

Fast prime lenses such as the costlier but faster and still compact Panasonic Leica DG Elmarit 200mm f/2.8 Power OIS and the Panasonic Leica DG Nocticron 42.5mm f/1.2 Aspheric Power OIS should be considered.

Alternatively, if Dual IS and Dual IS 2 are not absolutely essential for your work, consider Olympus’ great-for-video repeatable manual clutch focus-equipped M.Zuiko Pro professional lens series with its f/2.8 zoom lens fixed maximum apertures and f/1.2 maximum aperture prime lenses.

As borne out by my experience with Panasonic’s Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 12-60mm, the effects of variable maximum apertures are less limiting in stills photography where faster shutter speeds, higher ISOs and Dual IS and Dual IS 2 come into play.

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  • Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 8-18mm f/2.8-4 ASPH. LensB&H
  • Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 12-60mm f/2.8-4 ASPH. POWER O.I.S. LensB&H
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David Thorpe: A Look At The Panasonic 35-100mm f4-5.6 Micro Four Thirds Compact Zoom Lens

“This is a take on the Panasonic 35-100mm f4-5.6 compact zoom lens lens for Micro Four Thirds, M43, M4/3, MFT cameras by David Thorpe….”

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  • Panasonic Lumix G Vario 35-100mm f/4-5.6 ASPH. MEGA O.I.S. LensB&H

David Thorpe: The Panasonic Lumix 35-100mm f2.8 Zoom Lens Review

“A hands-on review and test of the Panasonic zoom 35-100mm f2.8 Lumix ASPH “X Vario” lens….”

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The new version of this lens, the Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 35-100mm f/2.8 II Aspheric Power OIS H-HSA35100.

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  • Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 35-100mm f/2.8 II POWER O.I.S. Lens – B&H
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David Thorpe: The Olympus 40-150mm f/2.8 Pro Zoom Lens

“This is my take on the Olympus 40-150mm f/2.8 Pro zoom lens lens for Micro Four Thirds, M43, M4/3, MFT cameras…”

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David Thorpe: A Look At The Panasonic Leica 100-400mm Long Zoom Lens For Micro four Thirds Cameras

“The Panasonic Leica 100-400mm is a mighty long lens. With this, if you hear the cry ‘Up in the sky, look! it’s a bird! it’s a plane!’ you’ll be the guy or gal who says ‘it’s Superman!’. And you’ll have a shot a portrait of him in flight to prove it….”

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  • Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmar 100-400mm f/4-6.3 ASPH. POWER O.I.S. LensB&H