Canon’s Chickens Come Home To Roost With Crippled Canon EOS R5 Flagship 8K 35mm Sensor-Equipped Mirrorless Stills & Video Hybrid Camera

Given the trials and tribulations of living in lockdown for the past few months I have not been following the release of Canon’s EOS R5 and EOS R6 mirrorless hybrid cameras as closely as I should have. Apologies, so here is a catch-up.

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Canon EOS R5 flagship mirrorless hybrid stills and video digital camera with Canon RF 24-105mm f/4.0 L IS USM zoom lens. Image courtesy of Canon via B&H.

My lockdown-born distance from recent digital developments suddenly changed when I came across a rather shocking Instagram post by camera accessories company Tilta featuring its Tiltaing Cooling Camera Cage for Canon R5, featuring its Canon EOS R5 Cooling Kit, a fan-driven and heavily-finned device designed, apparently, to rapidly reduce the camera’s temperature to one that makes it a little more usable.

Camera accessories maker SmallRig also appears to be working on a solution for the Canon EOS R5 and R6 cameras’ overheating problems, a Cool Cage for R5, and the company may take a different approach to that of Tilta.

Time will tell just as it will as to the actual usability of the R5 and R6 for their designed purposes, but for now enough camera reviewers with a professional background have shed whatever Canon fanboy tendencies they might still harbour in order to share some of the many problems they have been having with both cameras.

Canon EOS R5

Images courtesy of Canon via B&H.

Canon describes the R6 as having “… four times the detail of 4K” making it “the world’s first interchangeable lens digital camera with 8K movies” and the specs for the R5 and R6 certainly look impressive.

But, given the comments I have been reading from credible reviewers like Philip Bloom, Gerald Undone, Andrew Reid and Matthew Allard, the R5 and possibly the R6 appear to be major fails that may lead to class action lawsuits against Canon given the R5 at least does not live up to its marketing claims.

Canon EOS R6

Images courtesy of Canon via B&H.

Might Canon fanboys be better off with the R6 just as a stills photography camera given it is slightly cheaper than the R5?

Tilta Tiltaing Cooling Kit for Canon EOS R5

Images courtesy of Tilta.

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You know what the most annoying thing about the Canon R5 is? It’s that if it didn’t have these ridiculous issues it would be such an amazing camera. This is the first camera I have used in memory that punishes you for using it. Shoot stills then down goes your ability to shoot video in all but the basic line skipped normal speed mode. It is capable of utterly stunning images but there is absolutely no way this could ever be used as a hybrid camera, which it is marketed as, unless you are willing to live with the basic video mode. After shooting about 15 minutes of 8k (just basic IPB mode not raw) today spread out over an hour and then leaving camera off for 90 minutes I was never able to get the 8K option back, nor the 4K 120p, not the 4K HQ and not even line skipped 4K 50p! Basically if you want to use the good video modes use them first, don’t think shooting line skipped means you can use them later. Everything you do reduces the amount of time you can use those modes I mentioned above. The only time you can get the max amount is when you first turn on the camera. Please don’t tell me to use an external recorder. They should be used to bring new features to your camera not because your camera won’t let you record internally anymore as you’ve “shot too much”! I love the form factor of the small body especially for handheld. An external recorder would kill this. I love the stills, I love the video quality in the 8K and HQ mode. I love the animal video autofocus BUT I loathe being unable to use my camera as I want to most of the time. Please don’t accuse me of bias. I have none. I love Canon and have a lot of history with them. I spent £4200 on a camera I cannot use most of the time and that’s ludicrous! I truly hope they find a way to fix this debacle.

A post shared by Philip Bloom (@philipbloom) on

In his Facebook post on the EOS R5, Philip Bloom adds:

Please don’t accuse me of bias. I have none. I love Canon and have a lot of history with them. I spent £4200 on a camera I cannot use most of the time and that’s ludicrous! I truly hope they find a way to fix this debacle.

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You either love it or hate it. Canon EF 24-105mm f/4.0 L IS USM zoom lens, prone to the all-too-common aperture control ribbon cable failure.

Unlike Mr Bloom, I do not love Canon and nor do I have a lot of history with the brand’s products.

My first Canon camera was the once revolutionary but even-then crippled EOS 5D Mark II which was initially only available in a kit with the Canon EF 24-105mm f/4.0 L IS USM zoom lens.

From the start there was a problem with the 5D Mark II, its erase button remaining pushed in after first attempt at using the camera so it went straight back to Canon Australia and eventually returned with the button repaired under warranty.

A straight-out replacement would have been a better option.

Then, just after the warranty for camera and lens expired, the 24-105mm kit zoom lens failed spectacularly and I have still not been able to have it restored to working order.

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Canon EOS 5D Mark II with Canon EF 24-105mm f/4.0 L IS USM kit zoom lens.

Despite urgings by my BFF to get rid of my 5D Mark II, I have kept it despite not having a working Canon EF lens for it, instead occasionally using it with a couple of adapted M42 manual focus lenses via a Gobe M42 to EF adapter.

My beloved late uncle Brian Bell aka Sir Brian Ernest Bell CSM, KBE, CStJ, of the Sir Brian Bell Foundation and the Brian Bell Group of Companies, paid for my Canon EOS 5D Mark II and its Canon EF 24-105mm f/4.0 L IS USM zoom lens, and I simply cannot let them go given I barely knew him and yet he proved to be so kind to me and understanding of my situation in his final years alive.

Uncle Brian gave me the 5D Mark II and lens as a gift in order to help me start a new life in photography and video after too many years away from them due to often insurmountable health issues.

At the time I knew nothing about the mirrorless hybrid revolution that was going on at Panasonic and to a lesser degree at Olympus so did not, to my regret, immediately buy into those two company’s Micro Four Thirds system that offered so much more than Canon in terms of affordability and video production capabilities.

Despite my misgivings about Canon’s clear lack of adequate quality control, thus quickly coming to rely instead on Fujifilm, Olympus and Panasonic cameras and lenses, I continued to hope that Canon might eventually see the light and provide the necessary alternative to the smaller sensor-based systems.

So, what a disappointment Canon’s attempt at matching if not surpassing Panasonic’s S-Series cameras has turned out to be, but I should not be surprised given what my BFF has told me about Canon’s research and development efforts before and during the time she worked there in an engineering role.

For fifteen years, apparently, Canon’s Australian R&D division was at the cutting edge of global camera, lens, printing and other technologies and creativity and innovation were anything but dirty words.

Canon had bought an independent Sydney-based R&D company then turned it into the major part of its worldwide product and technology development effort, replete with top engineers, mathematicians, physicists and other scientists and technologists.

Then the suits and the marketing types began taking it all for granted, replacing all this talent with the cult of process engineering, resulting in employees voluntarily departing or being fired en masse to the point where Canon’s R&D division no longer existed.

The scientists and technologists with the genius to solve problems like those apparent in the Canon EOS R5 and R6 were no longer there and, with the company now in the hands of marketing men, this mess is the result.

The chickens that became so apparent in the long years my BFF worked at Canon have finally come to roost, with a vengeance.

The “cripple hammer” described so often by my BFF and increasing numbers of professional customers has found its mark on the cameras that were supposed to firmly establish Canon as a pro-quality force in the mirrorless hybrid realm.

There will be nasty outcomes for Canon from all of this.

For a start, in his latest article at time of writing on the R5, Andrew Reid of EOSHD states that:

If it is proven that Canon purposefully hobbled the camera, or artificially restricted recording times in firmware, with heat as an excuse, in all the highest quality video modes on the EOS R5 they advertised as key headline grabbing features, I will never buy another Canon camera again for as long as I live and I think the full force of consumer law should be brought to bear.

Lastly, here is a comment from my BFF:

“Having worked for over ten years in the Canon research arm (CiSRA) I’ve seen first hand the erosion of innovation, given in to a vast implementation of process engineering.

Contrary to the process engineering activity curve rising sharply, our USPTO patent and innovation curve dived to nearly nothing in the space of three years.

It was all about keeping us engineers heads down with endless vacuous new policies thrown at us, while stifling us with excessive process engineering admin activities such as process management, configuration and release management, excessive performance waterfall adherence and the endless justification to Canon head office that we were worth keeping as a world-class Australian research facility, all the while shedding staff; some of the most brilliant sw and hw engineers, math professors, physicists and other ground-breaking innovators.

The company eventually closed its doors in 2016 after having spent millions moving office space.

In the end, the pointy-headed managers and their cohorts raked in the money while everyone else suffered.

Canon management only have themselves to blame.

Being a Japanese company, the way that female engineers get paid less than male engineers is bad enough, but the way management has destroyed innovation in this company is a crime.”

Links

DPReview: CP+ 2019: Fujifilm interview – ‘We want to show photographers the future’

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/8410636142/cp-2019-fujifilm-interview-we-want-to-show-photographers-the-future

“At the CP+ show earlier this month in Yokohama Japan, we sat down with senior executives from Fujifilm. During our conversation we covered everything from the upcoming GFX 100, to plans for APS-C and why the X100 still occupies such an important position in the company’s lineup.

Our interview was conducted with three senior executives in Fujifilm’s Electronic Imaging Products Division:

  • Toshi Iida, General Manager.
  • Makoto Oishi, Product Planning Manager.
  • Shin Udono, Senior Manager of the Sales and Marketing Group.…”

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  • Fujifilm camerasB&H
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1Styles.pro Offers 200+ Excellent Film Emulation Styles for Capture One Pro at 40% Off, Until July 9

Photography has a glorious and long pre-digital history in form of black-and-white aka monochrome, colour in the form of colour transparency film and colour negative film, and colour and monochrome in the form of instant films. 

Little wonder, then, that for many of us who grew up in the analog era analog film emulations provide an essential array of image processing presets, ways of interpreting images based on how films and printing methods shaped tone and colour and thus emotion and information. 

One raw digital negative, three interpretations using 1Styles.pro film emulation presets for Phase One Capture One Pro – Kodak Portra 160VC v2, Kodak Ektachrome mid-1970s (blue) and Kodak Royal Gold 400 v4 Winter.

I often rely on film emulation software in the form of look-up tables aka LUTs, presets, plug-ins and standalone software whether editing stills or video, and one of my favourite film emulation preset collections is made by Alexander Svet of 1Styles.pro.

Mr Svet’s Capture One Film Styles and Capture One Film Styles Extended Set play a big role in how I use Phase One’s Capture One Pro raw image processing software and both sets’ 200in-total film emulation styles are, in my opinion, essentials for anyone needing to make the most out of image editing in Capture One.

I cannot recommend them too highly.

Here, at 1Styles.pro, we started a great sale: 40% discount on all the Film Styles for Capture One till July 9.

If you’re following AlexOnRAW for a while, you know – that’s a big deal. Discounts on our styles are a quite rare, and it’s 100% worth to grab.
Let me remind you how our styles can improve your Capture One workflow:

Original Film Styles Set – https://sellfy.com/p/c9Em/

$29.97 (regular price – $49.95, you save $19.98)
100 styles which emulate classic films. That’s a great tool to find a glorious color correction for your images quickly.

Extended Film Styles Set – https://sellfy.com/p/ufdj/

$41.97 (regular price – $69.95, you save $27.98)
Additional 100 new film styles! All styles are unique, there are no duplicates in both sets. Extended Set delivers more artistic emulation of film picture, plus it offers film grain emulation styles.

Film Styles Bundle – https://sellfy.com/p/uGx5/

$57 (regular price – $95, you save $38)

200+ film styles in a bundle with additional 20% discount. That’s a fantastic source of inspiration for your editing.

All the color styles work with layers in Capture One Pro 11. Each B&W style has four versions with different opacities: 100%, 75%, 50% and 25%.

You can download 12 sample styles for free to try them before buying – https://goo.gl/SoHVa3

If you had thought of purchasing Film Styles before – this is the moment.

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Panasonic Announces Lumix DC-GX9 Rangefinder-Style Camera – List of Links and Videos

Panasonic has announced the Lumix DC-GX9 rangefinder-style camera, reportedly the successor to the Lumix DMC-GX8, and this article lists links to articles, press releases, reviews and videos about the camera. I will be sharing my thoughts about the GX9 in a separate article coming soon.

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Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9 with kit lens, Panasonic Lumix G Vario 12-32mm f/3.5-5.6, being touted as a “street photography” camera.

Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9 Camera for “Street Photography”

Articles

Media and News Releases

Product Pages

Product Reviews

Videos

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  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera with 12-60mm LensB&H

Fuji Rumors: Fujifilm X-H1: Full English Press Release and More Images with MK Lenses

https://www.fujirumors.com/fujifilm-x-h1-full-english-press-release-images-mk-lenses/

“In case you missed it, I have google translated to English the entire press release leaked in German as well as manually translated the full specs sheet (see below). You can also download the specs sheet in English here at my dropbox….”

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Fujifilm X-H1 with battery grip and Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS kit zoom, image released by Nokishita and republished at Fuji Rumors.

Commentary

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Fujifilm X-H1 with Fujinon MK 18-55mm T2.9 X-Mount Cinema Zoom

Fuji Rumors has outdone itself on the Fujifilm X-H1 with heavily detailed specifications lists, press releases, images and size comparisons between the X-H1 and other hybrid stills/video cameras whether mirrorless or DSLR, in advance of Fujifilm’s official X-H1 product announcement on February 15.

That announcement will no doubt also include the X-Mount versions of Fujifilm’s MK Series 18-55mm T2.9 and 50-135mm T2.9 cinema zoom lenses, previously released in E-Mount versions for Sony cinema and Sony Alpha hybrid cameras in the α7 and α9 series.

I will be publishing official product photographs, specifications, and links to articles and videos by moviemakers and photographers who have been working with pre-production versions of the Fujifilm X-H1 and X-Mount versions of the Fujinon MK Series zoom lenses after Fujifilm’s announcement on the 15th and no doubt that article will be a lengthy one.

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Samsung NX1 with Samsung Premium S 50-150mm f/2.8 ED OIS zoom lens, still the benchmark for up-to-date Super 35mm hybrid video cameras, though it missed out on a fully-articulated monitor and 10-bit 4:2:2.

With the leaks by DigiCame-Info, Fuji Rumors and Nokishita, there has been much discussion and speculation at online moviemaking fora, much of it comparing the X-H1’s video specifications to Panasonic’s Lumix DC-GH5 and DC-GH5S Super 16/Micro Four Thirds cameras, and Samsung’s discontinued but still revolutionary Super 35/APS-C NX1.

All three cameras raised the bar for mirrorless video very high indeed.

This is the set of video-centric features I have been hoping to see appear in the X-H1:

  • 4K UHD and 4K DCI 200 Mbit
  • 4K 60p
  • 5-axis in-body image stabilization (IBIS) that works in conjunction with optical image stabilization (OIS)
  • 10-bit 4:2:2
  • Battery grip with full controls for vertical/portrait orientation
  • Decent battery sizes
  • Decent body grip
  • Decent set of of well-spaced colour-matched native X-Mount prime and zoom lenses with manual clutch focus or at least linear focus-by-wire
  • Dual memory card slots
  • Exposure zebras with ability to set percentages/IRE levels
  • External recording via HDMI 2.0+
  • Full 10-bit internal F-Log
  • Fully-articulated monitor
  • Fully-customizable picture profiles
  • In-body audio-monitoring aka headphone port
  • Unlimited recording duration
  • Viable eye and face autofocus
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Is this the camera that inspired Fujifilm’s X-H1 designers? The Contax N1 autofocus analog SLR, last in a long line of Kyocera-made Contax cameras licensing the Contax brand from Zeiss, released in 2000. Kyocera also made Yashica brand cameras.

How many of these boxes, as it were, will the DSLR-style Fujifilm X-H1 tick and how much will any non-inclusion of essential features mitigate against the X-H1 in being a viable, up-to-date video camera for the sorts of productions that warrant Super 35 image quality?

Or, will that good old Australian saying, “close enough is good enough”, be applicable enough in the case of the Fujifilm X-H1?

Links

ePHOTOzine: Top 12 Best Panasonic Lenses 2018

https://www.ephotozine.com/article/top-12-best-panasonic-lenses-2018-27053

“We’ve taken a look at the Panasonic lenses that we’ve reviewed to date, crunched some numbers and have combined the results in a round-up that features the highest scoring lenses so you can make a more informed choice when making your next purchase….”

Commentary

panasonic_lumix_g_12-32_f3.5-5.6_white_square_01_1024px
Panasonic Lumix G Vario 12-32mm f/3.5-5.6 Aspheric Mega OIS standard zoom lens, provided as a kit lens with some of Panasonic’s more affordable rangefinder-style cameras but a very worthy lens to consider for all of their cameras, though it is not available for sale on its own in many territories. This lens can be bought new or in good used condition at eBay, and other online and offline retailers.

With a dearth of local retail outlets where one might see and try before one may choose to buy and an over-reliance on online reviews that are often not specific enough, sites with well-qualified reviewers and enough history to have broad, deep overviews prove invaluable.

I came across ePHOTOzine through the video reviews of former Fleet Street photographer David Thorpe and thus discovered his articles for the magazine as well as his own website, and now ePHOTOzine benefits by basking in his expert glow.

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All of Panasonic’s Micro Four Thirds lenses as of April 2017.
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Panasonic Lumix G 20mm f/1.7 II Aspheric prime lens, another highly-regarded small, affordable lens and that is the equivalent to 40mm in the 35mm sensor format, often referred to as “perfect normal”. The legendary Leica/Minolta CL/CLE analog cameras were supplied with 40mm lenses as standard.

I have had few enough opportunities to discover the many pleasures and challenges of Panasonic Lumix and Leica Micro Four Thirds lenses in real life, and so rely on these “best lenses” lists to better my understanding.

Given an unlimited bank account I would first choose Olympus’ M.Zuiko Pro prime and zoom lenses for my professional documentary stills and video work given their many advantages and especially their manual clutch focus, but photography is my daily passion as well as my less frequent paid work and so cheaper, smaller hardware has its uses too.

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Panasonic Lumix GX8 with Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 Aspheric II Mega OIS kit zoom, a more manageable small outfit for daily carry than with the larger, heavier though excellent Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 Pro.

Right now I am considering adding a handful of tiny Panasonic Lumix G lenses to my smaller daily carry kit bag, for use with smaller cameras like my beloved Panasonic Lumix GX8, and ePHOTOzine’s list as well as the ones below is proving invaluable to me as I hope they will to you too.

I will be buying some of these lenses online and secondhand as local camera stores seem have given up on buying and selling secondhand gear, and the usual caveat emptor (buyer beware) applies.

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The Cosyspeed Camslinger Streetomatic Plus Camera Bag is an excellent waist-pack for carrying a minimal kit such as a GX8 plus two or three small lenses or one large one.

If purchasing from sites like eBay ensure that the seller provides a good selection of close-up photographs, all the correct information and model details, and pay through PayPal so that refunds can be made if the lens does not live up to its description.

Above all else, do your research and if you have access to stores that sell secondhand then give them a go before buying online as there is no substitute for try before you buy.

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Panasonic Lumix G 14mm f/2.5 II Aspheric prime lens

Here is my own long list of small, discrete Panasonic Lumix G lenses for purchase secondhand:

This is my three-lens shortlist of small, reasonably fast Panasonic primes:

  • Panasonic Lumix G 14mm f/2.5 II Aspheric
  • Panasonic Lumix G 20mm f/1.7 II Aspheric
  • Panasonic Lumix G 42.5mm f/1.7 Aspheric Power OIS

If I could carry just one prime lens for any format it would be the equivalent of 35mm in the 35mm sensor format, which is 17.5mm in Micro Four Thirds.

Panasonic does not make a 17.5mm lens though, and the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 17mm f/1.8 is reportedly suboptimal for effective video and stills use, so my affordable one lens solution needs must be a zoom lens that includes that focal length and others:

  • Panasonic Lumix G Vario 12-32mm f/3.5-5.6 Aspheric Mega OIS, or
  • Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 II Aspheric Mega OIS

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panasonic_leica_dg_nocticron_42.5mm_f1.2_aspheric_power_ois_H-NS043_01_1024px
The Panasonic Leica DG Nocticron 42.5mm f/1.2 Power OIS, an excellent lens with a very Leica-like optical look and feel, if you can afford. I preferred German lenses and especially Leica lenses during the analog era when I was shooting colour transparency film, but nowadays I am exploring other brands of lenses and their own particular ways of rendering flesh and blood.

Clicking on these affiliate links and purchasing through them helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled: Stories of Creativity, Innovation, Success’.

These lenses are listed in order of recommendation in ePHOTOzine’s Top 12 List of 2018.

  1. Panasonic Leica DG Nocticron 42.5mm f/1.2 ASPHB&H
  2. Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 35-100mm f/2.8 Asph OISB&H
  3. Panasonic Leica DG Elmarit 200mm f/2.8 Power O.I.SB&H
  4. Panasonic Lumix 35-100mm f/4-5.6 Asph Mega OISB&H
  5. Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-42mm f/3.5-5.6 IIB&H
  6. Panasonic Lumix G Vario 12-32mm f/3.5-5.6 AsphB&H – only available bundled with certain Lumix cameras in some territories and now unavailable as a standalone purchase via B&H.
  7. Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 12mm f/1.4 ASPHB&H
  8. Panasonic Lumix G X Vario 12-35mm f/2.8B&H
  9. Panasonic Lumix G 20mm II f/1.7B&H
  10. Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmar 100-400mm f/4.0-6.3 ASPH ProB&H
  11. Panasonic LUMIX G 25mm f/1.7 ASPHB&H
  12. Panasonic Lumix G Vario 12-60mm f/3.5-5.6 AsphB&H

CameraLabs: Panasonic Lumix G9 review so far

https://www.cameralabs.com/panasonic-lumix-g9-review/

“Panasonic’s Lumix G9 is a high-end mirrorless camera aimed at enthusiasts, delivering the best photo quality and fastest shooting from a Lumix G body to date….

… While the G9 is Panasonic’s ultimate stills camera, it’s no slouch for video, sporting 4k at up to 60p, 1080 at 180fps, relay-recording by swapping SD cards, and 4:2:0 / 8 bit internal recording. Here are my podcast and video reviews of the camera, starting with an overview; scroll down for my sample images and movies!”

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ePHOTOzine: Panasonic Lumix G9 Expert Review

https://www.ephotozine.com/article/panasonic-lumix-g9-expert-review-31614

“Panasonic Lumix G9 Expert Review – We review the new Panasonic Lumix G9, Panasonic flagship 20mp Micro Four Thirds camera with interchangeable lenses, high-speed shooting, and 80mp high-resolution mode….”

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Lumix G Experience: Get a grip – close up look at the G9’s battery grip – COMMENTARY

https://www.lumixgexperience.panasonic.co.uk/learn/expert-advice/get-a-grip-close-up-look-at-the-g9s-battery-grip/

“I thought you might like a closer look at the battery grip for the Lumix G9. It’s called DMW-BGG9 (catchy!) and is designed specifically for the camera – it doesn’t fit any others. If you pre-order the G9 before 14th January in the UK this grip comes free (see the Panasonic site for details), but even after the offer is over it is an accessory worth considering especially if you shoot a lot of upright compositions….”

Commentary

Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 with Panasonic DMW-BGG9 battery grip attached.

Many photographers and cinematographers of my acquaintance who rely on Micro Four Thirds cameras for their work seem to be unaware of the usefulness of battery grips.

I certainly was until I had a little spare cash sitting around after buying my Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH4 and wondered what accessories might improve my experience of the camera.

Now I cannot conceive of buying a new camera for moviemaking or photography without including a battery grip in its purchase, if one is offered by the camera’s manufacturer.

My GH4’s DMW-BGGH3 battery grip is attached almost all the time and only comes off when I need to place the GH4 in a cage for moviemaking.

The grip is lightweight when loaded with a battery, does not add much size or weight to the camera, and allow me to carry camera-plus-battery grip in the same shoulder bags and backpacks that easily hold my gripless GH4.

Battery grips are especially useful for better balance and handling safety and comfort when attaching long, heavy lenses to the camera.

They also make it easier to hold and operate the camera and its controls when shooting in portrait or vertical format.

I note that some camera cage makers are now producing cages to hold gripped cameras, such as SmallRig’s Professional Half-cage Kit for Panasonic Lumix GH5 with Battery Grip 2025.

When I add further cameras to my production kit like the GH5, GH5s or G9, I will most certainly be purchasing their battery grips at the same time.

Damien Demolder’s article about the G9’s battery grip reveals that Panasonic has improved the ergonomics and their grip design beyond that of the GH4’s battery grip, substituting an on/off toggle switch for the GH4’s on/off slider and moving it to a more sensible location, and adding a joystick.

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  • Panasonic DMW-BGG9 Battery GripB&H
  • Panasonic DMW-BGGH3 Battery Grip for Lumix GH3 and GH4 Digital CamerasB&H
  • Panasonic DMW-BGGH5 Battery GripB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera (Body Only)B&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital CameraB&H
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