Fujifilm X-T3 First Impressions

I have been using the Fujifilm X-T3 since its release late last week and, in brief, it is the camera that I was hoping the X-T2 would be both in stills and video functionality. 

I like the X-T3 though I am not naturally an SLR-style camera user for stills photography, having spent my formative and magazine photography years relying on rangefinder cameras in a number of film formats from 35mm through 120 roll film to 4″x5″ sheet film. 

I have relied on DSLR-style cameras for video, however, specifically Panasonic’s Lumix DMC-GH4 and GH5 though not, as yet, the GH5S. 

fujifilm_x-t3_16_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujinon XF 18-55mm f2.8-4.0 R LM OIS kit zoom lens.

I chose Panasonic’s Micro Four Thirds mirrorless hybrid cameras for video due to Fujifilm’s APS-C hybrid cameras lack of professional-quality video capabilities for so long.

Until now, that is.

I will be putting the X-T3 to the test over the next few days and will then be better able to determine if the X-T3 is as ready for professional use in documentary photography and video production as its Panasonic Lumix counterparts.

_dsf9672_iridientxtransformer_square_03_1920px_80pc
Fujifilm X-T3 alongside the legendary and sadly discontinued Samsung NX1, until now the most advanced APS-C/Super 35 DSLR-style mirrorless camera. Is the X-T3 the NX1 successor that I have been hoping for? Quite possibly, but further testing for stills and video are required before I can definitely answer that question.

Until then, my first impressions of the Fujifilm X-T3 are very favourable indeed, especially on the stills photography front as I took it straight into production documenting an all-day event on the day of arrival and all the following day too.

I will be more specific about how and why in coming articles soon, covering stills and video.

Meanwhile here are the general and stills photography features and improvements I have used and like so far:

  • Bigger, easier to grip body and more stability when handholding for video due to increased weight and better balance.
  • Bigger, easier to grip dials.
  • Bigger buttons, easier to locate unseen.
  • Choice of linear or non-linear focussing with focus-by-wire lenses.
  • Faster and surer face/eye focus detection in available light, available darkness and with the face turned sideways.
  • Larger built-in grip, though I would still add the metal hand grip or vertical battery grip for larger lenses and portrait photography.
  • Faster and more accurate autofocus.
  • Flicker reduction using mechanical shutter.
  • Locking diopter adjustment!!!
  • More megapixels at 26.1 MP, which appears to lead to much less noise when shooting in available darkness at high ISOs.
  • Size, shape and silver colour leads to being ignored when shooting side-by-side with Canon and Nikon DSLR users as I look like an amateur playing with a toy or an old analog era camera.

And finally and straight out of left field, here is a feature I would love to see on all DSLR-style cameras including those made by Fujifilm, that was again pioneered by Samsung but in its NX30 and not the NX1:

samsung_nx30_06_1024px_80pc
The amazing tilting electronic viewfinder eyepiece on the Samsung NX30 with Samsung 18-55mm III f/3.5-5.6 OIS zoom lens, making waist-level photography possible as Panasonic did on its Lumix DMC-GX8 professional flagship rangefinder-style M43 hybrid camera. Panasonic, where is the pro-quality successor to the GX8?

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

fujifilm_vg-xt3_vertical_battery_grip_03_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm X-T3 with VG-XT3 Vertical Battery Grip and Fujifilm XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS zoom lens.

Clicking on these affiliate links and purchasing through them helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

  • Bluestar Eye CushionsB&H – use on the Fujifilm Wide Eyecup EC-XH W eyecup to further enhance its usefulness when shooting video.
  • Fujifilm CVR-XT3 Cover KitB&H
  • Fujifilm EC-GFX Round Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XH W Wide Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XT L Long Eye Cup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XT M Medium Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XT S Small Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm Grip Belt GB-001 for Select X-Series CamerasB&H
  • Fujifilm MHG-XT3 Metal Hand GripB&H
  • Fujifilm NP-W126S Li-Ion Battery PackB&H
  • Fujifilm VG-XT3 Vertical Battery GripB&H
  • Fujifilm Fujinon XF LensesB&H
  • Fujifilm X-T3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H

Fujifilm X-T3 Owner’s Manual in HTML and PDF, Firmware Update Version 1.01 Now Available for Download

I am awaiting delivery of a Fujifilm X-T3 review loaner and was alerted that a firmware update for the X-T3 would be released before the weekend. 

The ever-reliable Fuji Rumors website has just informed its readers that the Version 1.01 firmware updater is now available with a lock-up fix included, and the Fujifilm X-T3 Owner’s Manual is also now available as a PDF and as a webpage

fujifilm_x-t3_05_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS kit zoom lens.

I am downloading the X-T3 Owner’s Manual as a PDF right now and will be scouring it to find out more about the camera’s many new and improved features, especially exposure zebras.

A request to Fujifilm – choice of linear focusing with all focus-by-wire lenses, please!

fujfilm_x-h1_focusringoperation_01_1024px_80pc
Focus Ring Operation choices for the Fujifilm X-H1 camera and now the X-T3. Every Fujifilm camera needs these options for use with the many Fujinon lenses that do not have manual clutch focus. I choose linear over nonlinear any day, especially when shooting video.

As I have often found in recent years, it always pays to at least skim through the owner’s manual of any new gear you buy in order to learn how to quickly get the best out of it.

A request to Fujifilm and all makers of APS-C and 35mm sensor cameras – 4:3/3:4 aspect ratio, please!

fujifilm_vg-xt3_vertical_battery_grip_10_1024px
The 3:4 aspect ratio of Micro Four Thirds is much better than the 2:3 aspect ratio of APS-C and 35mm sensors for vertical portraits and is close to the aspect ratio of magazine pages. We need 4:3/3:3 added to aspect ratio choices in all APS-C and 35mm sensor cameras via firmware. Fujifilm X-T3 with VG-XT3 Vertical Battery Grip.

Fujifilm, please add 4:3 in horizontal/landscape orientation and 3:4 in vertical/portrait orientation to your current aspect ratio choices of 3:2/2:3, 1:1 and 16:9 in your next firmware updates for all your cameras, especially those most likely to be used by professionals.

I, like many professionals working for advertising and editorial clients, find it far easier and more accurate to create a well-designed photograph within an aspect ratio as close as possible to those in which the image will be used.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

fujifilm_mhg-xt3_metal_hand_grip_01_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm MHG-XT3 Metal Hand Grip. Every Fujifilm camera, in my experience, benefits from attaching a metal hand grip or better yet a vertical battery grip.

Clicking on these affiliate links and purchasing through them helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

  • Bluestar Eye CushionsB&H – use on the Fujifilm Wide Eyecup EC-XH W eyecup to further enhance its usefulness when shooting video.
  • Fujifilm CVR-XT3 Cover KitB&H
  • Fujifilm EC-GFX Round Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XH W Wide Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XT L Long Eye Cup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XT M Medium Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XT S Small Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm Grip Belt GB-001 for Select X-Series CamerasB&H
  • Fujifilm MHG-XT3 Metal Hand GripB&H
  • Fujifilm NP-W126S Li-Ion Battery PackB&H
  • Fujifilm VG-XT3 Vertical Battery GripB&H
  • Fujifilm Fujinon XF LensesB&H
  • Fujifilm X-T3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H

FUJIFILMglobal: Xtra Turbo X-T3 with Nicole Emanuel

“Australian photographer Nicole Emanual shoots horses on X-T3”

fujifilm_x-t3_02_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujifilm VG-XT3 Vertical Battery Grip and Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS kit zoom lens.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

fujifilm_grip_belt_gb-001_01_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm Grip Belt GB-001. I recommend using camera straps on all your cameras and especially Fujifilm cameras with metal hand grips or vertical battery grips. I have Peak Design camera straps on all my gear, often up to three of them, but this Fujifilm hand grip looks great for battery grip-equipped cameras.

Clicking on these affiliate links and purchasing through them helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

  • Bluestar Eye CushionsB&H – use on the Fujifilm Wide Eyecup EC-XH W eyecup to further enhance its usefulness when shooting video.
  • Fujifilm CVR-XT3 Cover KitB&H
  • Fujifilm EC-GFX Round Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XH W Wide Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XT L Long Eye Cup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XT M Medium Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XT S Small Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm Grip Belt GB-001 for Select X-Series CamerasB&H
  • Fujifilm MHG-XT3 Metal Hand GripB&H
  • Fujifilm NP-W126S Li-Ion Battery PackB&H
  • Fujifilm VG-XT3 Vertical Battery GripB&H
  • Fujifilm Fujinon XF LensesB&H
  • Fujifilm X-T3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • Peak design camera strapsB&H

Is the Fujifilm X-T3 the Powerhouse Flagship APS-C/Super 35 DSLR-Style Mirrorless Hybrid Video and Stills Non-IBIS Camera We Have Been Waiting For?

Fujifilm has announced that it will launch the Fujifilm X-T3 “as the latest model in the X Series known for superior image quality with proprietary color reproduction technology. The camera will be launched on September 20, 2018” five days before photokina 2018 commences in Köln on September 25.  

The X-T3 has delivered more sophisticated new features and improvements than I expected when the camera was first rumoured and I am studying its specifications list, hands-on articles and videos with a great deal of interest right now. 

fujifilm_x-t3_01_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujifilm VG-XT3 Vertical Battery Grip and Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS kit zoom lens.

Commentary

The Fujifilm X-T3 is the first Fujifilm DSLR-style camera I would consider using in serious video production given its top notch video features and now that it has exposure zebras! Exposure zebras… YAY!!!

For me, Fujifilm’s most archetypal professional flagship cameras remain the X-Pro digital rangefinders given their evolution of the groundbreaking fixed lens X100 into interchangeable lens territory, and my APS-C format work in photography will centre on X-Pro cameras so long as Fujifilm continues to make them.

I would hate to see Fujifilm follow Panasonic’s recent decision to de-professionalize its Lumix GX rangefinder-style camera range into enthusiast-level gear intended for street photographers as the latter has done with the disappointing Lumix DC-GX9.

Rangefinder and rangefinder-style cameras in all sensor formats are the perfect fit for my way of seeing and photographing, both having evolved through many years of relying on rangefinder-equipped analog film cameras in all formats from 35mm roll film through to 4″x5″ sheet film.

SLR and DSLR cameras have always been secondary camera types for me, involving a very different way of seeing and photographing, one more akin to staring at a mirror into near-flat space rather then peering through a window at objects arrayed left to right, near to far and top to bottom of frame in deep space.

Fujifilm’s X-Pro line, most recently represented by the X-Pro2, is essentially three cameras in one – an optical viewfinder camera, an electronic viewfinder camera and a small view camera via its LCD monitor – and remain the most versatile and personally satisfying solution for documentary photography with focal lengths from 18mm through to 56mm.

contax_s2_60_year_anniversary_02_1024px_80pc
Contax S2 35mm single lens reflex camera which was fully mechanical, manually focused, manually-operated, had a spotmeter and used the Contax/Yashica bayonet mount in order to accept Carl Zeiss T* lenses. It was made by Kyocera, was introduced in 1992 and discontinued in 2000. I am always reminded of Contax SLRs when looking at Fujifilm’s X-T cameras. Image courtesy of Japan Camera Hunter.

DSLR-style cameras, on the other hand, are the electronic viewfinder-equipped descendants of optical viewfinder-equipped SLR cameras – two cameras in one through the benefit of their view camera-like LCD monitors.

DSLR-style cameras support my reliance on rangefinder and rangefinder-style cameras through being better suited to wider focal lengths than 18mm and longer lengths than 56mm.

They are also excellent cameras for more technical work such as architectural photography and product photography.

And now, with Fujifilm’s announcement of the X-T3, professional video production too.

Fujifilm began slowly but surely working on improving its cameras’ video functionality since customer requests to do so started flowing in to the company since the release of the X100.

As a documentary storyteller, I must always be equipped to best handle whatever situation I may find myself in, whether it demands photographs or video footage.

As a shoulder bag or backpack equipped solo operator, I can only carry so much gear and carrying two different cameras systems, one best for video and one best for stills, can be a bridge too far.

One camera system that can do both well enough is the key and, sadly, despite a number of Fujifilm kaizen firmware updates for the X-Pro2, its support for video remains problematic due to its lack of the ability to allow customized video settings such as noise reduction, highlight tone, shadow tone, color and sharpness.

The X-Pro2’s electronic viewfinder is also something of a disappointment when compared to those in the X-T1, X-T2 and the two Panasonic M43 cameras I have for documentary video production.

I need a second Fujifilm camera for my customary two-camera, two-lens documentary photography methodology, and at least one of those must produce good quality video.

With no rumors about the X-Pro3 still, I hope that we are not to assume the worst about the continuation of the X-Pro flagship line.

I have been hoping that the X-Pro3 will correct what is lacking in the otherwise excellent X-Pro2, namely its video functionality and most especially its EVF, so have been wondering if I should pay attention to the larger X-H flagship range or the smaller, sexier X-T range instead.

First glance at the X-T3’s specifications makes me think that it may prove a good solution should I be unable to wait for the X-Pro3’s arrival or if I must eventually cope with a possible tragic demise of the X-Pro range some day.

DSLR-style cameras can never replace rangefinder and rangefinder-style cameras due to their very different natures, but they can be excellent complements to each other.

Fujifilm X-T3 camera body, kit lens and vertical battery grip

Some accessories for the Fujifilm X-T3

Photographs of other Fujifilm and third party accessories for the X-T3 are currently unavailable, but we will place them here when they appear.

It appears that X-T3 review loaners may begin to make their appearance in Australia in October or November of this year.

Articles and Other Links

Hands-On Reviews

Press Releases

Product Brochures and Manuals

Product Pages

Product Videos

Reviewer Videos

Help support ‘Untitled’

fujifilm_ec-xh_wide_eyecup_02_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm Wide Eyecup EC-XH W, a great choice when shooting video with the Fujifilm X-T3, especially when used in conjunction with a synthetic chamois eye cushion by Bluestar.

Clicking on these affiliate links and purchasing through them helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

  • Bluestar Eye CushionsB&H
  • Fujifilm CVR-XT3 Cover KitB&H
  • Fujifilm EC-GFX Round Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XH Wide Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XT L Long Eye Cup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XT M Medium Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm EC-XT S Small Eyecup – B&H
  • Fujifilm MHG-XT3 Metal Hand GripB&H
  • Fujifilm NP-W126S Li-Ion Battery PackB&H
  • Fujifilm VG-XT3 Vertical Battery GripB&H
  • Fujifilm Fujinon XF LensesB&H
  • Fujifilm X-T3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H

Fstoppers: Fstoppers Reviews the BenQ SW320 and PV3200PT, Two Fantastic 4K Monitors

https://fstoppers.com/originals/fstoppers-reviews-benq-sw320-and-pv3200pt-two-fantastic-4k-monitors-267514

“For many photographers and videographers, editing and post-production are a vital part of the process. For this reason, it’s crucial to have an accurate and effective display to work on in order to produce the best results….”

Commentary

It has been a long time since I last came across a BenQ monitor in a store in either of the Australian cities in which I have lived, and I have never bought nor used one, so I cannot comment on their qualities for photography and video editing, nor their longevity, but I am willing to consider them and found this article a useful start to my research.

We often rely on two monitors here at the ‘Untitled’ home office, but some of them are ageing or failing, with yet another dying just the other day.

As a result we have sworn off Dell products for life and have been looking at other brands for our video and photo editing workstations as well as for more mundane tasks not demanding high-end monitors.

The two BenQ monitors covered in Fstoppers’ article look interesting but their lack of Thunderbolt connectivity means they are of limited interest for use with our Apple computers.

Will we upgrade our Windows PC to something more contemporary, and will either of these monitors play a part in that?

Or will we stick with Apple machines given the wide range of macOS software already in use here?

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

benq_sw320_31.5-inch_4k_color_accurate_ips_monitor_02_1024px_80pc
Hockey puck controller on the BenQ SW320 31.5″ 16:9 4K Color Accurate IPS Monitor.

Clicking on these affiliate links and purchasing through them helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled: Stories of Creativity, Innovation, Success’.

  • BenQ PV3200PT 32″ 16:9 4K Video Editing IPS MonitorB&H
  • BenQ SW320 31.5″ 16:9 4K Color Accurate IPS MonitorB&H

The Joy of Documentary Photography

Documentary photography is, in my opinion, one of the noblest, most socially useful and most personally rewarding pursuits one can engage in with camera in hand.

Photograph by David Turn from ‘Wales 1970s’ published by Café Royal Books.

It is regrettable that fashion and the death of magazines that relied upon documentary photography and its subgenre photojournalism have conspired to assign the genre into the waste bin of history only to be revived and celebrates by the likes of Café Royal Books, but that should not put off contemporary would-be documentary photographers.

Documentary photography at its best frames a mirror before the events, people and places of its time and is even more important in an age where entertainment is preferred to information, fantasy is preferred to fact and religion is preferred to science.

Against this background, documentary photography is an act of resistance born of seeing the world and all within it with supreme clarity.

Even if documentary photography’s current lack of fashionability and respectability, sees the genre absent from galleries, away from museums, off the television and out of print, I encourage all who may be so inclined to take on its mantle and practise it each and every day, where you live, where you work and in the streets of your city, town and country.

Do so especially if you are one of those whom the gatekeepers reject, whose experiences and views of the world are traditionally denied and ignored.

Do so especially when the gatekeepers may appear to accept your right to exist and be a documentary photographer but dictate rules and regulations at you that are designed to keep you, your vision and your work under control, compliant and conforming.

Do so because your right to to be you, to see as you do, to depict as you do and to tell your stories in your own way is unassailable no matter what lies you are told and what power games and punishments are enacted against you.

Above all, documentary photography is fun, demanding as it does a deep and constant engagement with this world and all that is in it to the point where it is possible to enter a flow state, also known as being in the zone.

Documentary photography is, in my experience, the surest way to achieve flow state that I know, a gateway into sheer joy.

Ways and means of production

The hardware and software of digital photography have come a long way since it began replacing analog film-based photography to the point where most cameras, lenses and processing software will do the job well enough now.

While most of the wide range of the analog era’s cameras, lenses and types of films, processing and printing materials no longer exist, contemporary digital cameras offer analogies of some of those upon which documentary photographers once relied:

  • Rangefinder cameras in 120 rollfilm and 35mm formats.
  • Single lens reflexes aka SLR.
  • Twin lens reflexes aka TLR.
  • View cameras in field camera and studio versions.

The mirrorless cameras of the analog era and now the digital age offer the advantage of silent operation and the lack of mirror slap and shutter shake, especially when shooting in electronic shutter mode.

Without the ongoing punitive financial burden of film, processing, proofing, printing and archival storage, digital photography is more affordable than analog so consider future-proofing and capability-expanding yourself through wise investment.

Hybrid digital mirrorless cameras open up the world of documentary moviemaking in ways that never existed for analog just with a little extra expenditure on video production accessories.

With DSLR giants Canon and Nikon finally seeing the light and slowly coming up with viable soon-to-be-released mirrorless alternatives, and mirrorless pioneers Fujifilm, Olympus and Panasonic already well established with a wide range of mirrorless cameras and lenses at several price points, there has never been a better range of choices in equipment.

Hybrid mirrorless cameras open up the world of documentary moviemaking in ways that never existed during the analog era and, with a little extra expenditure on video accessories, allow you to create professional-quality productions.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on these affiliate links and purchasing through them helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled: Stories of Creativity, Innovation, Success’.

I will add to this section soon, so please come back again if it is useful.

Rangefinder and Rangefinder-Style Cameras

Fujifilm
  • Fujifilm MHG-XPRO2 Metal Hand Grip for X-Pro2B&H
  • Fujifilm X-Pro2 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • Fujifilm X-Pro2 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 23mm f/2 Lens (Graphite)B&H
  • Match Technical EP-XP2 Thumbs Up Grip for Fujifilm X-Pro2 (Black)B&H

Mastin Labs: Inspired By | Ep. 4 Kirk Mastin / Diane Arbus, Lauren Greenfield and Annie Leibovitz

“… Mastin Labs founder Kirk Mastin shares a few female photographers that inspire him including Diane Arbus, Lauren Greenfield, and Annie Leibovitz.”

Commentary

I have yet to try out Mastin Labs’ film matching presets that are made by scanning real analog film with a Fuji Frontier scanner, but the results look amazing and more accurate than any by other companies.

I am not a big user of Adobe Lightroom and Photoshop these days, but I could certainly be convinced to go back to Photoshop sometime soon if Mr Mastin keeps adding more presets that are as amazing and as accurate as his Kodak Everyday pack as well as others such as Fujicolor Pushed, Portra Pushed, Fujicolor Original, Portra Original and Ilford Original.

If I were back shooting editorial portraits for magazines again then I would most certainly seriously consider, well, all of Mastin Labs’ presets and would also hope that some of my other favourite films would appear there one day soon.

 

Links

zonefocus: How I Set Up My Fujifilm X-T2 for Zone Focusing, by Steve Dimitriadis

http://www.zonefocus.net/blog/2018/7/23/how-i-set-up-my-fujifilm-x-t2-for-zone-focusing

I have always set up my cameras to zone focus by simply going into manual focus mode, setting the focusing distance scale to my desired focusing distance and shooting away.  The problem with this approach is that it is difficult to keep the focusing distance consistent because more often than not I am accidentely bumping the focusing ring.  However using the settings I describe below I have been able to circumvent both of these issues and have a reliable zone focusing setup….”

fujifilm_x-t2_graphite_01_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm X-T2 Graphite with Fujinon 35mm f/1.4 R prime lens

Commentary

leica_elmarit-m_28mm_f2-8_aspheric_1024px_60
Leica Elmarit-M 28mm f/2.8 Aspheric prime lens for Leica M-System cameras, the perfect medium-wide focal length for street photography given the effectiveness of zone focusing via setting hyperfocal distance with this lens. This lens is also wonderful for a two-camera, two-lens available light documentary set-up along with one of Leica’s 75mm lenses. For available darkness work, consider the Leica Summicron-M 28mm f/2.0 Aspheric or Leica Summilux-M 28mm f/1.4 Aspheric lens.

I made heavy use of zone focusing via setting hyperfocal distance during a years-long urban documentary project during the analog era when relying on a pair of Leica M-Series cameras and mostly 28mm and 35mm lenses.

Of the two my preference was the 28mm lens as its medium wide-angle focal length allowed me to be right in the middle of crowds and close-up to my human subjects while still revealing telling details of the environment in which they and I found ourselves.

Narrower or wider than 28mm or 35mm does not cut it for that approach, as I have proven to myself many times before and since, and ultra-wideangle lenses like the otherwise excellent Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R and Fujinon XF 16mm f/1.4 R WR with their 21mm and 24mm equivalent focal lengths impose a so-called “lensey” look on the image the perspective distortion of which draws undue attention to the lens and not to the subject matter when using it up-close and in-deep in the street.

Setting one of two hyperfocal distances for either closer or more distant action with the 18mm-equivalent 28mm Leica lens was a brilliant solution to the need for maximum speed and meant I could concentrate on seeing and getting into the zone, achieving maximum flow, achieving extraordinary outcomes that evaded a slower, more deliberate approach.

Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0 R prime lens, regrettably much too slow to focus manually or via autofocus and its aperture ring too flakey and quirky for fast-paced professional work in stills and video, though some folks seem to like it for the quirkiness that made it intensely frustrating for me.

My term for this high-speed, highly-focused approach to urban documentary photography was “visual athletics” and it produced challenging, heavy-muscled images that upset the denizens of my then-local art and photography community and challenged them in accepting my work as art much less as being in any way creative.

More fool them, now that photography is understood as an art form in its own right and that so-called street photography has become an acceptable creative practice.

It can be a thankless task, though, to be something of a provincial pioneer in any art form.

Ah well, get out the world’s tiniest violin.

Meanwhile Sydney-based documentary and street photographer Steve Dimitriadis of zone focus has my gratitude for sharing his zone focusing methodology using his Fujifilm X-T2 camera and Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0 R lens.

As I have written here a number of times, I am not a fan of Fujifilm’s ageing 18mm almost-pancake lens and have been waiting far too long for its modernized replacement.

A Fujicron-style Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0 R WR lens would be an acceptable upgrade especially for urban documentary photography but even better would be a far more versatile professional-style manual clutch focus lens in the manner of the Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 RXF 16mm f/1.4 R WR and XF 23mm f/1.4 R for stills and video.

Fujifilm, where is the Fujinon XF 18mm that Patrick of Fuji Rumors has been telling us is coming for ages now?

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

fujifilm_x-pro1_02_18mm_60mm_01_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm X-Pro1 with Fujinon XF 35mm f/1.4 R, Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0 R and Fujinon XF 60mm f/2.4 Macro prime lens, the first set of Fujinon XF lenses released by Fujifilm in March 2012.

Clicking on these affiliate links and purchasing through them helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled: Stories of Creativity, Innovation, Success’.

  • Breakthrough Photography X4 Brass UV filtersB&H – I rely on this brand’s beautifully-made non-binding knurled traction frame UV filters to protect all my lenses with filter diameters from 39mm up to 105mm.
  • Fujifilm XF 14mm f/2.8 R Ultra Wide-Angle LensB&H
  • Fujifilm XF 16mm f/1.4 R WR LensB&H
  • Fujifilm LH-XF16 Lens HoodB&H
  • Fujifilm 18mm f/2.0 XF R LensB&H
  • Fujifilm XF 23mm f/1.4 R LensB&H
  • Fujifilm LH-XF23 Lens Hood for XF 23mm f/1.4 RB&H – working close to your subjects in crowds demands protecting your cameras and lenses as much as you can, especially the front of your lens.
  • Vello LHF-XF23 Dedicated Lens HoodB&H – appears to be made in the same way as Panasonic’s pricier lens hood above.
  • Vello LHF-XF23II Dedicated Lens HoodB&H
  • Fujifilm XF 23mm f/2 R WR LensB&H
  • Fujifilm Lens Hood for XF23mmF2 and XF35mmF2 R WR LensesB&H
  • Fujifilm 35mm f/1.4 XF R LensB&H
  • Fujifilm X-E3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • Fujifilm X-H1 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • Fujifilm X-Pro2 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • Fujifilm X-Pro2 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 23mm f/2 Lens (Graphite)B&H
  • Fujifilm X-T2 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • Leica CL Mirrorless Digital Camera with 18mm Lens (Black)B&H – Leica’s APS-C sensor digital rangefinder-style camera with 28mm-equivalent f/2.8 interchangeable lens is one possible solution to Fujifilm’s lack of a decent 28mm-equivalent 18mm lens.
  • Leica Q (Typ 116) Digital CameraB&H – Leica’s 35mm sensor digital rangefinder-style camera with 28mm f/1.7 fixed lens is another possible solution to Fujifilm’s lack of a decent 28mm-equivalent 18mm lens.

Skylum: Enhance Your Workflow with the Latest Luminar Updates [Luminar 2018 1.3.0 has been released]

https://skylum.com/blog/enhance-your-workflow-with-the-latest-luminar-updates

luminar_2018_dam_single_image_view_01_1920px_60px
Single image view of Luminar 2018’s digital asset management (DAM) system, currently under development and due for release later in 2018. Luminar 1.3.0 already contains some great new additions and improvements including using DxO FilmPack as a plug-in, improved sharpening, scrolling through LUTs in the LUT Mapping Filter and more.

“Brand new for the Apple crowd is Plugin Support. You’re now be able to use these third-party plugins through the Plugins menu: Imagenomic Noiseware 5, Imagenomic Portraiture 3, Imagenomic Realgrain 2, and DxO FilmPack 5.

You also now have access to these Luminar improvements:

Raw Develop filter.

The Lens and Transform effects are now improved, for example when using the Compare option, effects aren’t shown on the left (Before) side, nor are the effects blended with the original when using the Filters Amount slider.

Sharpening.

It’s now easier to use the Sharpening filter with more responsive and accurate results. You can also get real-time feedback as you adjust the Sharpening controls and see all your changes in high res.

Batch Processing.

Exporting to several file formats is now possible, including new options for both PDF and JPEG-2000.

Filter Controls.

Save time by clicking on the checkbox or control name to enable or disable all filter checkboxes. You can also use scrubbable number sliders by mousing over the filter values, then moving the slider by clicking and dragging left or right.

JPEG Controls.

You can now precisely control your JPEG and JPEG-2000 compression. The Quality slider shows you the precise numeric value, and you can change it by clicking on a number or entering the exact value you want.

Image History.

When using the RAW Develop and Develop filters, check your image history to see White Balance presets, which are displayed with the preset name. You can also now use the “Save History” option when you save files using the “Windows Compatible” option.

LUT Mapping.

You can now easily scroll through your LUTs in the LUT Mapping filter.  Just hover your mouse over a LUT and it updates in real-time.

Language Support.

These eight languages now have improved localizations: Spanish, French, German, Portuguese, Brazilian Portuguese, Japanese, Chinese, and Simplified Chinese.”

Links