RØDE Microphones: Introducing the SoundField by RØDE NT-SF1 Ambisonic Microphone, the World’s First Broadcast-Grade Ambisonic Mic For Under $1000 – UPDATED

http://en.rode.com/blog/all/nt-sf1

“Just in time for NAB, Australian pro audio powerhouse, RØDE Microphones, is proud to announce its first broadcast-grade, 360-degree surround sound capture microphone and flagship product of a new brand in the RØDE family….

… The first product for the SoundField By RØDE family is a marriage of SoundField’s pristine ambisonic recording technology, and RØDE’s commitment to audio excellence accessible by all creators. Completely designed and made in Australia at RØDE’s Sydney campus, the NT-SF1 is a triumph of innovation and manufacturing quality. Featuring four of RØDE’s all-new, ultra-quiet ½-inch TF45C capsules in tetrahedral array, the NT-SF1 produces natural, transparent four channel A-format recordings which can be transformed and manipulated in B-Format, courtesy of the soon-to-be-released SoundField by RØDE plugin…. “

røde_soundfield_nt-sf1_hero_02_1024px_60pc
RØDE NT-SF1 Soundfield microphone

RØDE NT-SF1 Ambisonic SoundField Microphone

RØDE VideoMic SoundField On-Camera Ambisonics Microphone

Two versions of Røde’s Ambisonics SoundField microphone have been shown so far with the most recent being the one at the topi of the gallery below, showing a close family resemblance to Røde’s high-end Stereo VideoMic X.

RØDE Stereo VideoMic X Microphone aka SVMX

How to process A-format files in Apple Logic Pro X using third-party plug-ins as shared by the folks at Sennheiser

Set up an LCRS or quadrophonic surround track in Logic.

Go to Preferences -> Advanced Tools -> Show Advanced Tools and enable Surround.
Then go to File -> Project Settings -> Surround Format and select either LCRS or Surround.
Finally create a surround track by selecting Track -> New Tracks -> Audio and select Surround for both in- and output.
The plugin should now be available as Audio Unit on this track.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on these affiliate links and purchasing through them helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled: Stories of Creativity, Innovation, Success’.

  • Rode Stereo VideoMic XB&H
  • Rode VideoMic Pro Plus On-Camera Shotgun MicrophoneB&H
  • Rode VideoMic Pro with Rycote Lyre Shockmount – B&H
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News Shooter: RØDE VideoMic Pro+… Is it worth the upgrade? – COMMENTARY

http://www.newsshooter.com/2017/10/16/rode-videomic-pro-is-it-worth-the-upgrade/

“… the VideoMic Pro+ has some nice improvements that make it a much better, more usable microphone. But how does it sound? Well, I did some testing and found overall the microphone performs a little better (certainly as good) as the previous model. The VideoMic Pro+ sounds a little warmer to me, but the idea of the VideoMic Pro+ isn’t about an enhancement in the quality of the microphone capsule but rather making it more versatile and giving you better results in a wider range of applications….”

Commentary

I concur with Erik Naso’s findings and conclusions and note that, when attached to your camera via its hotshoe, the Røde VideoMic Pro+ (VMP+) does make it harder to place your eye up to the viewfinder due to the mic’s detachable 3.5mm TRS or other such cable jutting backwards.

As Mr Naso notes in the article comments section, many moviemakers use cages to mount their accessories, and coldshoe extenders for camera-top hotshoes are available at all price ranges to enable moving the VMP+ sideways or forwards.

I have two such extenders, a plastic Rycote cold shoe extension bar that came in an accessories kit and a Cam Caddie Flashner Kit bought for mounting lights and other accessories to cameras, light stands and cages.

Both serve the purpose and there are plenty more of their ilk out there.

While the VMP+’s predecessors are great microphones in their own right and share many features with this latest version, the VMP+ has enough new features to justify recommending it over them.

These include the:

  • automatic power on and off when camera switches on and off
  • choice of power and recharging options
  • curved foam windshield to better deflect wind and wind noise
  • detachable cable port allowing attachment of 3.5mm-to-2.5mm cables to fit 2.5mm audio port on certain cameras
  • non-removable, less fiddly battery door making for fast and easy battery replacement
  • safety channel when run-and-gun documentary situations disallow fine-tuning audio levels

One thing that Mr Naso and I have not yet done is try out the VMP+’s artificial fur windshield as it has yet to be released.

The folks at Røde tell me that:

It will be very similar to our “deluxe” windshields (WS6 and WS7) in the sense that it has a rubber gasket to ensure a secure fit on the mic itself, and it will replace the entire supplied foam windshield.

That sounds like a smart solution for a smart microphone and I look forward to its appearance soon.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on these affiliate links helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled: Stories of Creativity, Innovation, Success’.

  • Beachtek SC25 3.5mm to 2.5mm Stereo Output CableB&H
  • Cam Caddie Flashner KitsB&H
  • Movcam cagesB&H
  • Rode VideoMic Pro Plus On-Camera Shotgun MicrophoneB&H
  • Rode VXLR – Mono Mini-Jack to XLR ConverterB&H
  • Rycote 037303 Cold Shoe Extension BarB&H
  • Seercam cagesB&H

Røde Microphones Releases VideoMicro Pro+, New Top Rank On-Camera Directional aka Shotgun Microphone – UPDATED

Australian recording studio and video production mic company Røde Microphones announced the imminent release of its new self-powered on-camera directional mic the VideoMic Pro+ on July 25 and yesterday a review sample arrived on our doorstep, and what a microphone it is with a list of hardware and software improvements advancing well beyond its immediate predecessor the VideoMic Pro. Røde’s VideoMic Pro+ aka VMP+ is likely to quickly become the go-to top-end video hotshoe-mounted production shotgun microphone. 

I took the VideoMic Pro+ out for a quick spin attached to my Panasonic Lumix GX8, a wonderful stills camera and a sadly underestimated 4K UHD video camera now somewhat eclipsed by the Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5.

I threw a third-party TRS 3.5mm-to-2.5mm adapter sourced from the local Jaycar store into my bag as the GX8, like many smaller hybrid mirrorless cameras made today, is equipped with a 2.5mm audio jack in order to save space.

The two 2.5mm-to-3.5mm adapters here are the only ones I have been able to source in local stores and they are not the ideal solution. I am still looking for better-designed, better-made alternatives such as short 2.5mm-to-3.5mm TRS cables or smaller adapters so they do not get in the way or disconnect as these two do all the time.

I can’t help but wonder if there might be a better solution than adding a non-professional adapter into the audio equation, and whether Røde might be persuaded to make their own 3.5mm-to-2.5mm TRS patch cables in order to eliminate this one particular weakest link.

I often experience problems caused by these third-party 3.5mm-to-2.5mm adapters and have yet to find a more professional alternative. I like Røde’s red coiled cables for their quality, convenience and visibility.

I congratulate Røde Microphones for listening to its users and acting on that by replacing permanently attached cables with detachable cables on its newer products including the VideoMic Pro+, and hope that this is now the standard.

Røde Microphones VideoMic Pro+

My partner and I are both enduring one of the worst influenza seasons ever despite having been vaccinated so avoided street crowds and headed off for a coffee at the local high street, set up camera and microphone and pointed the rig in the general direction of our fellow caffeine addicts lined up at the front of the café.

Our test was quick and dirty to say the least as we want to spend time doing a more in-depth one over the coming days, but the results were impressive.

The first new feature

First feature put to the test was the new hinged battery door.

The VideoMic Pro’s battery door often presented a challenge to new users until time and practice taught them how to push it on and off without frustration and battery popping out onto the floor.

The VideoMic Pro+ is a much easier to use proposition and it takes little time to get the hang of two finger on the latches to release its hinged battery door.

Instead of relying on the locally hard-to-find rectangular 9v Lithium batteries required by the VMP and SVMX, the VMP+ allows the choice of two rechargeable AA batteries or Røde’s own LB-1 Lithium-Ion rechargeable.

If using third party AA-size lithium batteries, make sure that the current rating of the batteries will deliver the same or better than the Røde proprietary battery which is rated at 1600mAh (at 3.8 volts).

Røde’s VideoMic Pro+ product page implies that the VMP+ can also be powered by the detachable Micro USB cable so we will give that option a go soon. Meanwhile we chose the LB-1 lithium battery.

Auto on-off

The second standout feature we encountered is the VMP+’s automatic on-off power function. We plugged the detachable 3.5mm TRS cable into the VMP+ and then the GX8’s audio jack, switched the camera on and the VMP+ immediately powered up.

Then we powered the GX8 down and watched the VMP+ do the same. Yay! Great way to help save on battery power especially if toting just the one LB-1 battery about with you.

I wonder though if Røde will be making spare LB-1 batteries available in future? I always feel safer carrying at least one spare even if the batteries have well-earned reputations for longevity.

An easier interface

The next standout feature was the ease-of-use of the VideoMic Pro+’s electronic interface via push buttons instead of the VideoMic Pro’s sliders. I have always found sliders less sure than buttons in other devices and often wondered if I had inadvertently slid off-setting when in the field with the VMP.

The VMP+’s buttons makes that less of a concern, especially its power-on/off button which needs a slightly sustained push to to be activated. That is good, thoughtful design.

Also thoughtful and effective is the circular layout of the VMP+’s buttons and indicator LEDs. Although they are similar in functionality to those on the Røde Stereo VideoMic X, the latter’s controls are in a vertical straight line and have always felt just a little counterintuitive in use given their contradiction to the SVMX’s circular design.

My fingers leapt easily over the VideoMic Pro+’s button and LED arrangement and it was a doddle changing the settings while watching the GX8 audio indicators change in response.

The safety channel

Another new feature I am really looking forward to putting into practice soon is the VMP+’s Safety Channel, activated by pushing the Output Gain Control button and Power Button at the same time, lower right and upper middle.

The Safety Channel lowers the output of the dual-mono signal’s right channel by 10dB to account for sudden audio spikes and reduce the likelihood of fatal audio clipping. If the left channel is compromised then the right channel will most likely be okay.

The other major new hardware feature in the Røde VideoMic Pro+ is its optimized windshield, now larger and more rounded than the one in the VideoMic Pro. My BFF was very interested in that aspect of the VMP+ as she spent some time working on similar features for a US-based audio hardware and software corporation.

The curvy bits

Making windshields curvier apparently helps persuade wind to better deflect around the microphone’s sensitive bits with the benefit of less noise. My wording, not hers! Cue animation of wind represented by arrows approaching windshield and sliding off.

Røde Microphones has had an agreement with famous UK audio accessories makers Rycote in place for some time now whereby Røde manufactures its own Rycote Lyre shockmounts and is permitted to integrate them into its microphone designs.

I have been a Rycote customer for some years having observed various Rycote products in heavy use by audio professionals onset so it is pleasing that the Røde team seems to see Rycote in a similar light.

Which DeadCat?

The folks at Røde Microphones tell me that a new DeadCat optional windshield accessory specially tailored to the VideoMic Pro+ is being made and will be available soon. The DeadCat windshield for the VideoMic Pro is unsuitable for use with the VMP+.

Forget adapters, get a Beachtek 3.5mm-to-2.5mm coiled cable

Beachtek SC25 3.5mm-to-2.5mm coiled cable, suitable for connecting the Røde VideoMic Pro+ to the 2.5mm audio mini-jack of the Panasonic Lumix GX8 and other cameras.

I finally located a suitable 3.5mm-to-2.5mm cable and (almost) hit the jackpot with it being short, coiled, with gold-plated contacts and, an unexpected bonus, a different look to the 2.5mm end’s plastic moulding for fast and easy identification.

My order for several Beachtek SC25 3.5mm to 2.5mm Stereo Output Cables is now on its way.

It appears that Beachtek came up with this cable back in the Lumix GH1 days when Panasonic’s flagship DSLM had a 2.5mm audio minijack. Given it is likely that fewer cameras will be equipped with such jacks in future, I thought it best to get exercise my Rule of Three, two for location and one for the studio in case either or both are lost or damaged.

Coping with the VideoMic Pro+’s rear extension

The new Røde VideoMic Pro+ mounted on the Panasonic Lumix GH4’s hotshoe, showing how the rear of the microphone juts backwards.

Early users of the Røde VideoMic Pro+ have reported problems with the way mic with cable attached juts backwards into one’s face when mounting the VMP+ on the camera’s hotshoe.

I compared the way the VMP+ sits on my GX8’s hotshoe with how it works on my GH4’s hotshoe and can confirm these reports. The VideoMic Pro+ is fine with the rangefinder-style GX8 but the back of the microphone gets in the way when placing one’s eye up close to the DSLR-style GH4’s EVF.

I had a similar problem with the very first Røde microphone I bought, the original VideoMic, now replaced with the current red Rycote Lyre shockmount-equipped VideoMic.

The mic came with its hotshoe mount screw-attached to the centre of its rubber-band shockmount so all I had to do was unscrew the hotshoe mount, move it to the back of the shockmount and problem solved.

The VideoMic Pro+ cannot be modified in this way but there are other solutions. Camera cages are becoming increasingly popular and some of the latest have one or two off-centre coldshoe mounts built-in. All allow you to screw coldshoes onto any 1/4″/20 threaded that you wish.

Another possible solution is to attach a threaded or coldshoe-equipped handle or rail onto the camera’s hotshoe and place the VMP+ where it works best. The choice is yours, and there is a fair amount of choice in how you do it and where you find your ideal solution.

Adapting 3.5mm minijack microphones to XLR devices

Røde’s VXLR+ 3.5mm female TRS socket to male XLR adaptor converts 12 volt to 48 volt phantom power into 5 volt to 5 volt plug-in power. It is necessary if you wish to plug the Røde VideoMicro, VideoMic GO or HS2 microphones into XLR devices. The VXLR+ will replace the VXLR in due course, when the latter will be discontinued.

While researching the Røde VideoMic Pro+, I came across a new XLR adaptor on the company’s website, the VXLR+.

I added four Røde VXLR 3.5mm-to-XLR adaptors when I ordered my Tascam DR-70D four-channel audio recorder some time ago. This recorder has four XLR/TRS combo jacks and I feel safer adapting 3.5mm TRS to XLR when connecting microphones to all my XLR devices.

The data sheet PDF for the VXLR+ lists these compatible microphones for the VXLR+:

  • VideoMic
  • VideoMicro
  • VideoMic Pro
  • VideoMic Pro+
  • VideoMic GO
  • HS2
  • RØDELink Filmmaker Kit
  • smartLav+ (when used with SC3 adapter)

I have been informed that the VXLR+ will replace the VXLR in due course, when the VXLR will be discontinued. In the meantime the VXLR works fine with all the above microphones except for the VideoMicro, VideoMic GO and smartlav+. These three mics require plug-in power, which the VXLR+ can provide when they are plugged into XLR phantom power devices.

Links:

Image Credits:

Header image composite made from Røde Microphones product photographs in Adobe Photoshop then styled with Alien Skin Exposure X2. Gallery photographs made as 3-bracket HDRs on Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 camera with Panasonic Lumix G 25mm f/1.7 Aspheric prime lens then processed in Macphun Aurora HDR 2017 and Macphun Luminar for a Polaroid look.

Core Melt Reveals Beta Versions of Two Radical New Final Cut Pro X Plug-Ins, Chromatic and Scribeomatic

The Australian movie industry can lay claim to at least seven Australian-born production hardware and software success stories making oversized waves around the world – Atomos, Blackmagic Design, CoreMelt, Intelligent Assistance, LumaForge, Miller Tripods and Røde Microphones. CoreMelt makes some of the most innovative, most essential plug-ins for Final Cut Pro X including Lock&Load, SliceX, TrackX and DriveX, and more recently LUTx, the first five plug-ins I would install into any new FCPX installation. 

CoreMelt Chromatic Color Grading Beta Reveal at Faster Together Stage 25th April 2017, NAB Las Vegas

Scribeomatic: Beta Reveal at Faster Together Stage, 24th April 2017 at NAB Las Vegas 2017

CoreMelt’s Roger Bolton revealed two new FCPX plug-ins at NAB, Chromatic and Scribeomatic, and I strongly suspect that list of five most essential new-install plug-ins is about to grow to seven.

Links:

Competitions: RØDE Microphones’ My RØDE Reel 2017 and Zacuto’s My Story Filmmaking Competition

There are three short film competitions to watch out for each year and two of them hail from this part of the planet, The Antipodes. Two are current, RØDE Microphones‘ My Røde Reel and Zacuto‘s My Story Film Competition, with the latter closing acceptance of entries on 31st March and the former closing entries acceptance on 30th June. 

New Zealand colour grading software maker FilmConvert‘s Color Up Competition is in between seasons right now, as it were, with 2017’s coming later in the year. Time flies so I am sharing details here so you can be ready for when comp time comes around.

RØDE Microphone’s My RØDE Reel

Click the image above to go to the competition web page.

All three competitions come with great lists of attractive movie-industry prizes and sponsors, with RØDE Microphones stating that My RØDE Reel, now in its fourth year, “is the world’s largest short film competition”.

My RØDE Reel is also notable in that it offers a special Female Filmmaker award that is “selected by the judging panel, [and] is designed to encourage and celebrate women in the film community.”

I will leave it up to the three companies to share the details about each competition as only they can so if you wish to know more, please click on the links embedded in the text above or the links below.

Links:

Image Credits:

Header image concept and design by Carmel D. Morris.

On the Røde Again with the New VideoMic Pro+ & VideoMic SoundField Microphones

Australian audio brand Røde Microphones, part of the Freedman Electronics Group along with Aphex, Event Electronics and SoundField, celebrated its 50th year at the group’s RØDEShow 2017 event in Las Vegas earlier this year. Six new products were announced during RØDEShow 2017 with two specifically of interest to filmmakers, the VideoMic Pro+ and the VideoMic SoundField.

videomic_pro_hero_shot_1458px
The Røde VideoMic Pro+ with similar circuitry to the Røde Stereo VideoMic X (SVMX), Rycote Lyre shock mounts, hinged battery door and provision for two AA batteries or the Røde LB1 rechargeable lithium ion battery.

Røde Microphones made a major contribution in turning the then dirt track of audio recording for independent video production into a sealed super highway with its very first on-camera video microphone, the VideoMic, released in 2004.

Since that first innovation the market-leading company has released a series of new and updated video-centric recording products along with top-end microphones for audio studios and live music recording on-location.

It wasn’t so long ago that Røde revised its VideoMic and VideoMic Pro hotshoe-mounted shotgun mic lines with the addition of Rycote Lyre shock mounts, reportedly the best such mounts in the business.

rycote_lyre_shock_mounts_lots_1920px
Rycote Lyre shock mounts made by Røde Microphones rolling out of the new assembly line at Røde’s Silverwater, New South Wales, factory complex.

Since then Rycote shock mounts have found their way into all new Røde video microphones with Røde investing in a computer-controlled manufacturing machine to turn out its own Rycote Lyre mounts under licence.

I had the pleasure of a guided tour of the Røde factory over a year ago and it was an impressive facility back then. With its ongoing R&D, recent new Freedman Electronics Group acquisitions, new products, new staff and new computer-controlled manufacturing machinery, the Røde factory is no doubt even more impressive now.

The Røde VideoMic Pro+ Microphone

The new Røde VideoMic Pro+ flagship monaural on-camera directional mic is heir to a tradition begun almost thirteen years ago, before the DSLR moviemaking revolution sparked off by Canon adding Live View video capability to its Canon EOS 5D Mark II at the special request of the Reuters news agency.

videomic_pro_battery_door_1920px
The new Røde VideoMic Pro+ has a redesigned, hinged door and accepts two AA batteries as well as the coming new rechargeable LB1 lithium ion battery. This battery can be recharged via USB cable whilst remaining inside the VideoMic Pro+’s battery enclosure.

The original Røde VideoMic was a child of its time, when camcorders were king and the Sony PMW-EX1 Full HD camcorder was the weapon of choice of independent documentary moviemakers along with Sony wireless lavalier and shotgun microphones.

The EX1 and its stablemates were far too costly to own. You had to rent them day-by-day or on a weekly basis, and indie documentarians could only do that if they succeeded in running the gauntlet of funding bodies, broadcasters and any other organization, or politician, with an interest in the story you were proposing to tell.

The directional microphones of the era matched the size and cost of the cameras they were created to work with. The arrival of Røde’s VideoMic turned all that on its head. At about 25cm in length, the original VideoMic suited the length of the camcorders of its time but it was affordable enough for moviemakers like me to buy, not rent.

The current Rycote-equipped VideoMic Pro is a more compact proposition at 17cm in length and a better fit for the 4K mirrorless stills/video hybrid cameras starting to make a real dent in independent filmmaking.

The Røde VideoMic Pro+ may be same size or a little larger, but its innovations are big, with flocked microfibre replacing former models’ detachable windshields and the same sophisticated circuitry and switches of Røde’s high-end Stereo VideoMic X aka SVMX.

The hinged battery door – no more dropping or fumbling on location especially when in extreme conditions – is so welcome as is the coming lithium ion rechargeable LB1 battery.

I am a fan of removable screwed-in audio cables – I am sure there is a better name for them – from when I owned my own Sony wireless lavaliers. I am looking forward to trying the VideoMic Pro+ out – there is little doubt it will be as popular as the very first VideoMic.

The Røde VideoMic SoundField Microphone

Røde’s VideoMic SoundField may be something of a sleeper amongst those unfamiliar with the world of ambisonics but it is something my research into alternative recording methods touched on several years ago.

Back then the most achievable combination of surround with directional audio miking was the mid/side method which required encoding/decoding with audio plug-ins like Voxengo‘s free Mid-Side Encoder-Decoder aka MSED.

I ruled out mid-side recording due to it being too unwieldy for one-person crew field use, without investing in a whole new M/S-miked field recorder. Røde’s all-in-one VideoMic SoundField microphone is a whole other proposition that could conceivably replace two or three different types of microphones with the common pick-up patterns illustrated below with just one mic that has all three patterns built-in.

Common Microphone Patterns

Or in effect, far more than three audio output patterns. I am still at the start of learning about the ins and outs of ambisonics recording and processing so the best I can do is point you to some online resources, below.

VideoMic SoundField Patterns

My hope is that Røde will write their own book, as it were, on ambisonics so that the applications and processing methods of the VideoMic SoundField microphone and its output will be well-known on its arrival. Clearly Røde has the in-house expertise to do so with the Freedman Electronics Groups recent company purchases.

Processing SoundField Audio Files

So far though the book has yet to be written about how to to get the best out of the hardware and how to best process ambisonic audio files. I have begun the research process early, before the microphone is expected to be released, in order to be ready.

The free Harpex Player, with a free .AMB ambisonics audio file playing. Harpex also makes a paid-for plug-in for processing ambisonics files in DAWs.

It is an ongoing process, but so far I have found two free items of software, the standalone Harpex Player, above, and the SoundField SurroundZone 2 plug-in. Harpex also makes a premium-priced plug-in available for a 30-day free trial or for purchase at €498.00 ex VAT.

The free SoundField SurroundZone 2 plug-in for digital audio workstations (DAWs), in this illustration Pro Tools.

Search in any search engine for ambisonics plug-ins or free ambisonics sample audio files with the suffix .amb and you can get a head start on understanding this fascinating audio format and how to process it.

There are also some good learning resources available, including Welcome to the Wonderful World of Ambisonics, A Primer, by John Leonard, at the A Sound Effect website. A Sound Effect has a number of ambisonics sound effects libraries available for purchase.

At the moment I am trying to work out how to use these plug-ins in my DAW of choice, Apple’s Logic Pro X as companion to Final Cut Pro X.

RØDEShow 2017 Video:

RØDEShow 2017 New Product Releases from RØDE Microphones on Vimeo.

Image Credits:

Header image concept and production by Carmel D. Morris.

Product shot still frames extracted from RØDEShow 2017 video.