Capture One Pro: Capture One & Fuji with Eivind Røhne

“Eivind Røhne is an editorial and commercial photographer based in Oslo, Norway. He photographs people, fashion, architecture and industrial subjects for national and international clients.

Eivind is also a Fuji X photographer, a brand ambassador for Fuji cameras.

Therefore, in this webinar Eivind will show us his processing techniques in Capture One, specifically to optimise images from X-Trans cameras.”

Links

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  • Phase One Capture One Pro 10 (Download)B&H
  • Fujifilm X-E3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • Fujifilm X-Pro2 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • Fujifilm X-T2 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • Fujifilm X-T20 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • Fujifilm X100F Digital CameraB&H

Jim Nix: Mastering Aurora HDR 2018

“Learn how to use Aurora HDR 2018 to create stunning and powerful photos. Learn tips and tricks for better HDR photos, follow my editing workflow ideas, and master this powerful image editing tool.”

Links

OnOne Software, Inc.: ON1 Photo Raw 2018 Beta

https://www.on1.com/promo/photo-raw-2018-beta/

“ON1 Photo RAW 2018 is focused on allowing you to get the most out of every photo. Our super fast, non-destructive, and state-of-the-art processing engine gives an ultra smooth editing experience. Photographers now have a tool with fast photo management, precise photo development, hundreds of customizable effects, fast and beautiful HDR, panos, masking and selection tools, layers, and much more — in one app.”

Link

Alien Skin Software: Introducing Exposure X3, The Latest Version of Our Advanced RAW Photo Editor

https://www.alienskin.com/blog/2017/introducing-exposure-x3/

“I’m excited to announce that Exposure X3 is now available! It’s the latest version of Exposure, our award-winning creative photo editor, and includes new features that greatly enhance your ability to create beautiful images and master your workflow….”

Link

ON1: ON1 Short Clip – New Lens Correction

The New Lens Correction pane in version 2017.5 automatically detects your lens and reduces distortion, chromatic aberration and peripheral fall-off. It automatically applies the correction when you browse to a photo. Further manual adjustments can also be made in Develop. If there isn’t a built-in profile for your lens you can manually adjust it as well.

We are close to releasing the next free update to ON1 Photo RAW 2017. Version 2017.5 will bring essential features, performance upgrades, and bug fixes to speed up and improve your workflow. These new videos give you a sneak peek of what we’re working on.

Macphun: Celebrate! Macphun Photo Software is Coming to Windows PC

https://macphun.com/pc

Try piccure+ When Sharpness is NOT a Bourgeois Concept

Magnum photographer Henri-Cartier-Bresson once famously stated that “sharpness is a bourgeois concept” and thousands of would-be photographers have taken what was intended as a jocular retort to heart as if it were gospel from the greatest man ever to hold a camera. Nothing could be further from the truth. 

From Vanity Fair magazine’s Shooting Past 80 article on photographers 80 years of age and older:

“He had his little Leica,” Newton remembers, “and he simply would point and shoot.” Since Cartier-Bresson’s hand isn’t as steady as it used to be, some of the pictures were a bit fuzzy. “Sharpness,” he told Newton, “is a bourgeois concept.” Newton sits back and laughs: “I thought that was just divine.”

So one of the most-quoted photographer statements ever was born as a joke between two veteran photographers, Helmut Newton and Henri Cartier-Bresson, and then has been used ever since as the justification for poorly-made snapshots, as holy writ.

Thomas Fitzgerald, a Dublin-based fine art photographer with a technical and graphic design background, concurs in a timely article about sharpness, Sharpness is Not Overrated and Why I Care About Image Quality

Every now and then someone trots out some article or blog post about how “sharpness is overrated” and how you shouldn’t care about getting sharp images, and how having technically accurate pictures somehow makes you gear obsessed and a bad photographer.

I have been giving sharpness, JPEG image size and quality, and cameras with and without optical low pass filters (OLPF) some thought lately, in the light of new cameras being released without them.

I love each of the hybrid APS-C and Micro Four Thirds cameras I have here, whether they are primarily for video or for stills photography, but I don’t want to discard any of them because they are not producing results as sharp as the most recently released cameras such as the Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5.

I often use several cameras in the course of my projects and need their results to work together well. That need is becoming even more urgent now that I am uploading full-sized 100% quality JPEGs to my Flickr account and will be doing so for other such accounts and websites soon.

What to do? Then I remembered piccure+ from having used a trial version a while ago, when all this was less of a problem and I was still trying to understand how to achieve optimum sharpness in a number of raw processors and image editors.

If you find yourself in the same position as I am in now, then give piccure+ a go.

Links:

Picktorial 3.0 Photo Editor for Mac OS X Updated to Version 3.0

Picktorial 3.0 by Picktorial Innovations LTD is the latest incarnation of a powerful image editor with an apparently simple, elegant interface, made for macOS. Picktorial contains an impressive array of features and presets, and is currently on offer at an introductory price of USD 39.99, down from its usual price of USD 69.99. 

The Picktorial 3.0 GUI with demo image.

With the vacuum created by Apple abandoning Aperture, the photography image organising and editing software especially popular with professional photographers, publishers and agencies, as well as a certain amount of disgruntlement with Adobe, a number of smaller independent software creators have seen their opportunity and I welcome the choice that has appeared in recent times.

I have installed a trial version of Picktorial 3.0 on my production iMac, but our recent problem with lack of Internet and phone has meant that I am well behind on all my work. I will be putting Picktorial to the test as soon as I can, but in the meantime I can highly recommend Thomas Fitzgerald’s introductory article on it at his website below.

Links:

Iridient Developer Raw Processor Adds Support for Fujifilm GFX 50S, X100F, Leica M10, Panasonic GH5 and More

Raw processing software developer Iridient Digital has updated its flagship Macintosh MacOS product Iridient Developer to version 3.1.4. Iridient Developer is reportedly favoured by photographers seeing to gain the sharpest, most highly detailed renderings of raw files from Fujifilm cameras with non-Bayer X-Trans sensors. 

Iridient Developer 3.1.4 supports raw files from 11 new cameras including the Fujifilm X100F, depicted here being processed using Iridient Digital’s Fujifilm Pro Neg S film simulation profile.

Iridient Developer also supports non-X-Trans Bayer sensor-equipped cameras, notably Fujifilm’s recently released GFX 50S medium format camera as well as over 620 other cameras.

The list of new cameras supported by version 3.1.4 of Iridient Developer includes:

  • Canon – G9 X Mark II and EOS M6.
  • Fujifilm – GFX 50S, X-T20, X100F and X-A10.
  • Leica – M10
  • Panasonic – DC-GH5 and DC-FZ80 aka DC-FZ82.
  • Pentax – KP
  • Sigma – sd Quattro H, DNG format only.

Iridient Digital’s other software product, Iridient X-Transformer, is currently under development and has been updated to beta version 3. Iridient X-Transformer converts Fujifilm X-Trans and non-X-Trans RAF raw image files into open standard DNG raw files.

Links:

The color presets for APS-C models have been improved, especially for the extreme ends of the tonal range (dark shadows and bright highlights). The Vivid style in particular should show much better results in dark shadows and very bright colors in many cases should show more gradual transition to clipping and better saturation.

These film emulation style presets are intended to produce a similar look to the X-Trans in-camera conversion styles for Classic Chrome, Standard/Provia, Soft/Astia, Vivid/Velvia, ProNegStd, ProNegHi, Monochrome, Monochrome+Ye, Monochrome+R, Monochrome+G and Sepia.

Image Credits:

Header image concept and design by Carmel D. Morris.