RAWLITE: OLPF + IR-cut for BMPCC, BMMCC and BMCC 2.5K

http://rawlite.com/

“The ultimate upgrade for your Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera, Blackmagic Micro Cinema Camera and Blackmagic Cinema Camera 2.5K (MFT)….

… Due to their size and image quality the BMPCC and BMMCC are widely recognized as great digital cinema camera’s [sic]. It’s now possible to get the most out of them by taking away their main weaknesses: moiré and IR contamination.

The RAWLITE IR-cut OLPF incorporates low pass layers that control the prevention of moiré. The original glass of the BMPCC and BMMCC does not have such layers….”

blackmagic_pocket_cinema_camera_4k_bmpcc4k_06_1024px_60pc
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K by Blackmagic Design, which apparently will need third party infrared-cut aka IR-cut filtration or the IR-cut OPLF solution provided by RAWLITE.

Commentary

When cinematographer John Brawley mentioned that he was investigating an IR-cut solution made by RAWLITE on the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K forum at EOSHD, I made a mental note to research the problem of infrared pollution in Blackmagic Design’s cameras and possible solutions.

I talked to a rep about the olpf at NAB and they said that they tend to not put filters on their cameras and if they do its always minor because they are obsessed with image quality. Kind of a shame in terms of IR pollution. I remember having to put my Hoya IR cut filter on every freaking lens I owned because the original pocket had such bad IR pollution. I think this cam will have the same issue. … David Altizer

Given that users of the coming Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K will need to use fixed or variable neutral density filters on lenses attached to the camera, as it does not have built-in NDs like its URSA stablemates, it would be great if all NDs came with IR-cut capability, but they do not.

As a self-funded documentary moviemaker working fast and alone on location, variable neutral density filters are a more viable option than fixed value NDs and the last thing I want to do is add yet another layer of glass and filtration on top of my VNDs as Mr Altizer describes above.

Accordingly RAWLITE’s solution may be the bee’s knees provided it produces a version for the  Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K in time for the camera’s projected release in September 2018.

Time will tell.

Links

Image Credits

Header image concept and hack by Carmel D. Morris.

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on these affiliate links and purchasing through them helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled: Stories of Creativity, Innovation, Success’.

  • Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema CameraB&H
  • Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 4KB&H
  • IR-Cut filtersB&H
  • Tiffen Hot Mirror filtersB&H
  • Tiffen Water White IRND filtersB&H

Try piccure+ When Sharpness is NOT a Bourgeois Concept

Magnum photographer Henri-Cartier-Bresson once famously stated that “sharpness is a bourgeois concept” and thousands of would-be photographers have taken what was intended as a jocular retort to heart as if it were gospel from the greatest man ever to hold a camera. Nothing could be further from the truth. 

From Vanity Fair magazine’s Shooting Past 80 article on photographers 80 years of age and older:

“He had his little Leica,” Newton remembers, “and he simply would point and shoot.” Since Cartier-Bresson’s hand isn’t as steady as it used to be, some of the pictures were a bit fuzzy. “Sharpness,” he told Newton, “is a bourgeois concept.” Newton sits back and laughs: “I thought that was just divine.”

So one of the most-quoted photographer statements ever was born as a joke between two veteran photographers, Helmut Newton and Henri Cartier-Bresson, and then has been used ever since as the justification for poorly-made snapshots, as holy writ.

Thomas Fitzgerald, a Dublin-based fine art photographer with a technical and graphic design background, concurs in a timely article about sharpness, Sharpness is Not Overrated and Why I Care About Image Quality

Every now and then someone trots out some article or blog post about how “sharpness is overrated” and how you shouldn’t care about getting sharp images, and how having technically accurate pictures somehow makes you gear obsessed and a bad photographer.

I have been giving sharpness, JPEG image size and quality, and cameras with and without optical low pass filters (OLPF) some thought lately, in the light of new cameras being released without them.

I love each of the hybrid APS-C and Micro Four Thirds cameras I have here, whether they are primarily for video or for stills photography, but I don’t want to discard any of them because they are not producing results as sharp as the most recently released cameras such as the Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5.

I often use several cameras in the course of my projects and need their results to work together well. That need is becoming even more urgent now that I am uploading full-sized 100% quality JPEGs to my Flickr account and will be doing so for other such accounts and websites soon.

What to do? Then I remembered piccure+ from having used a trial version a while ago, when all this was less of a problem and I was still trying to understand how to achieve optimum sharpness in a number of raw processors and image editors.

If you find yourself in the same position as I am in now, then give piccure+ a go.

Links: