Lumix G | Experience: Panasonic Lumix LX100 II – a look at the new features

https://www.lumixgexperience.panasonic.co.uk/news/panasonic-lumix-lx100-ii-a-look-at-whats-new/

“… It isn’t like Panasonic to have Mk II versions of its cameras in Europe but it is easy to see why this particular model is being presented as a ‘version’ rather than as a LX200 might have been. The LX100 II is clearly an update of the LX100, bringing the feature-set of the four-year-old compact into line with that of the company’s current G series cameras. At first, second and third glance, the new model is very much like the original in look and feel as almost all the changes have happened inside not outside the body….

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Panasonic Lumix DC-LX100 II

Commentary

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Fujifilm X10 with fixed collapsible zoom lens fully extended, a terrific complement to the Fujifilm X100 fixed prime lens camera. Brilliant for stills photography, not so much for video.

Although Panasonic classes its Lumix DC-LX100 II as a camera for enthusiasts, this stratification of camera models into professional, enthusiast and beginner is just a little off the mark especially given the varying needs of independent documentary moviemakers and photographers.

Few professionals rely on just the top-end flagship cameras and lenses in any product range.

When I felt the need to supplement the revolutionary Fujifilm X100 “enthusiasts” camera with something similar I chose Fujifilm’s X10 and relied on both for professional-level photography assignments for my voluntary work for a health and human rights charity.

I could have used my Canon EOS 5D Mark II for the job but it would have been the most inappropriate choice given the circumstances and sensitivities of my subjects and the places and events where they were to be found.

My X100 has been honourably retired though it sometimes comes out for documentary projects where discretion is demanded, and my X10 has found a home with a friend needing a great little travel camera.

The only downside to both cameras was Fujifilm’s then lack of commitment to top quality video, so I switched over to Panasonic’s groundbreaking Lumix DMC-GH4 as my prime stills and video camera with a Lumix DMC-GX8 as a backup which rived so capable in its own right that I often carry it every day equipped with the sadly underestimated Lumix G Vario 12-32mm f/3.5-5.6 Aspheric Mega OIS zoom that I bought secondhand via eBay.

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SmallRig Cage for Panasonic Lumix LX100 2198, enabling easy attachment of handles, monitors and other accessories to the camera.

The only downside to both cameras is that neither is as compact as Fujifilm’s two offerings and had I known about the Lumix DMC-LX100 chances are that I would have added one of those to my kit.

I still miss the ability to carry a small, lightweight camera with me each and every day either stowed in a larger bag or in its own dedicated detachable belt pouch such as Think Tank Photo’s Stuff It! or better yet Little Stuff It!

Panasonic’s Lumix LX100 was unique in its day for mating a top-quality wide aperture Leica, no less, zoom lens with a variable Micro Four Thirds sensor and still has no equivalent in other brands other than Leica’s D-LUX (Typ 109), an outcome of the Panasonic-Leica camera and lens joint production exercise.

The announcement of the Lumix LX100’s successor as a newer version rather than a complete new replacement in the form of the long-expected Lumix LX200 has come as a surprise and casts doubt on whether and when the hoped-for vamped-up LX200 may ever appear.

Meanwhile I will be keeping an eye out for hands-on reviews of the Lumix LX100 II, adding them to this page, and am hoping that the camera will provide a worthy supplement to its predecessor which clearly still has some life left in it yet albeit with a slightly reduced feature set compared to the Lumix LX100 II.

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FUJIFILMglobal: Cinematographer Richard Blanshard tests 4K movie recording

Director of Cinematography Nancy Schreiber Honoured by American Society of Cinematographers with President’s Award

Feature film and documentary DoP Nancy Schreiber is the very first female cinematographer to receive the ASC’s Presidents Award and it might, just might, inspire young women to take up cinematography with an eye on working in feature films. I certainly hope so. 

As reported in Variety, over the last thirty years the American Society of Cinematographers has given the Presidents Award to a list of distinguished male Directors of Photography including Gimme Shelter‘s Albert Maysles,  Blade Runner‘s Douglas Trumbull, Justified‘s Francis Kenny and Star WarsRichard Edlund.

The only other female movie professional and ASC member to win an ASC award, DoP Tami Reiker, won 2004’s Movie of the Week or Pilot for lensing the first season of Carnivalé released by HBO.

Before the World Wide Web came into being freeing up the sharing of information, gatekeepers controlled access to facts about career possibilities, especially for women.

Growing up in a far-flung regional capital meant submitting to what one was told one was permitted to do artistically and professionally, and those who kicked against the pricks were severely censured, even blacklisted.

There were no female cinematographers or directors to be seen, no role models and certainly no mentors. Potentially brilliant careers were curbed and subjected to the interests of the gatekeepers’ hold on power.

Only those of the right gender and background were permitted to know about further professional moviemaking education then given the chance of applying for it, often with a well-mentored career to follow.

Without positive examples of successful female filmmakers and especially cinematographers, I and other visual storytelling creatives of my acquaintance flushed their hopes and dreams of moviemaking careers for more mundane occupations supporting men in the traditional manner or employment in production support if they were lucky.

Most just stopped being creative, dreams shattered completely.

The Presidents Award, writes Variety‘s Valentina I. Valentini, “honors a member’s contribution to the next generation of DPs. Schreiber has been a longtime mentor to younger camera crew members, and has worked with Film Independent’s Project Involve — a program designed to enhance the careers of women and people of color.”

We all know the dismal statistics about the lack of filmmakers of color in the industry. Women and LGBT artists also nearly impossible to find. Project Involve is working to change all that….

Ms Schreiber, Variety‘s article continues, “has taught advanced cinematography at the American Film Institute, and is a guest lecturer at film schools around the world.”

If only someone like Nancy Schreiber had existed when I was young, and had reached out to potential young filmmakers outside the film school system in the east.

Variety‘s article ends with this inspirational quote:

“If this award does anything,” says Schreiber, “it will open some doors to the younger generation of women, to show that they can succeed, that they can work in all areas of the film and television industry.”

As the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media so wisely states in its motto, “If she can see it, she can be it.”

Image Credits:

Header aka featured image created for this website in Photoshop by Carmel D. Morris.

Wacom Announces New Wacom Intuos Pro Pen Tablet, Great for Photographers and Filmmakers

Pen tablet maker Wacom introduced the latest version of its popular Wacom Intuos Pro pen tablet and, from the specifications, it raises the bar for pen-based input when editing yet again.

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I have used Wacom pen tablets since the days of Apple ABS connectors after observing how my designer coworkers suffered so much from Carpal Tunnel Syndrome, RSI or whatever the current term is for skeleto-muscular overuse and have only had such problems myself when employers refused permission to take my Wacoms into the office.

Wacom pen tablets do more than allay repetitive overuse injuries and this latest version of the Intuos Pro is very tempting indeed. I have a small Intuos 5 Touch, which looks very close to the Intuos Pro S, on this desk in my photography and video editing workroom, and there are Bamboo pen tablets attached to two other computers here.

My older Wacoms have found homes with grateful non-creative owners who had never used anything but a conventional mouse then developed overuse pain and injuries. I always make the point that anybody can benefit from relying on pen tablets as their primary pointing and clicking device. I have seen the benefits in action many times.

Some people, however, never seem to get the hang of using pen tablets, which is a real pity, or outright reject the idea of giving up the mouse. I have no answer for the naysayers, but I suspect the reason some cannot abide tablets is this, that they seem to want look at the pen on their tablet, move it, look up at their computer monitor, check what they have done, look back at the pen, make a move, and so on.

Doing all that is enough to wear anyone out. Watching it has certainly made me feel exhausted. The answer, for those with enough resolve, is simply to look only at the monitor while moving the pen over the tablet in the very same way that people learn how to use a mouse.

There are alternatives too. Wacom also makes a range of monitors that you can directly draw upon, at a number of price points, under the MobileStudio and Cintiq names. I haven’t tried any of them yet but I certainly hope to.

Although my current Wacoms are small, my very first was a large model. I replaced it with a smaller one when I began travelling and have stuck with small ones ever since for the sake of travel and commuting while carrying 15-inch Mac Book Pros.

Now that I am editing on an iMac 27-inch 5K Retina computer in my home office, I am wondering whether it is time to give a medium or large Wacom a go once again. This standing desk has enough space from front to rear and left to right to accomodate larger input devices as well as two monitors next to the iMac.

I used to know a top graphic designer/magazine art director who had a curved multi-level desk with side arms custom-built to hold the biggest pen tablet he could get, but he always sat to work. I prefer the many health benefits of standing. I am glad this desk is larger and more versatile than any I was given when working in agency and corporate offices.

Image Credits:

Header photoillustration aka featured image created for this website in Affinity Photo by Karin Gottschalk. Product photographs kindly supplied by Wacom.