David Thorpe: A Look At The Panasonic G90 Micro Four Thirds Camera

“The Panasonic G90/95 sits between the smaller and cheaper GX9 and their top range G9 and GH5 models. Its predecessor, the (still available) 16Mp G80 met with many accolades. Does the 20Mp G90/95 render obsolete the G80? Or should you skip this one and wait for a G10?”

panasonic_lumix_dc-g90_g91_g95_01_1024px
Panasonic Lumix DC-G95 with Panasonic Lumix G Vario 12-60mm f/3.5-5.6 Aspheric Power OIS zoom lens and Panasonic DMW-BGG1 Battery Grip.

Commentary

Former Fleet Street newspaper and magazine photographer David Thorpe is one of the best and most quietly-spoken video reviewers of Micro Four Thirds cameras and lenses, lately supplemented with Panasonic’s L-Mount 35mm sensor-equipped mirrorless cameras and lenses, and I cannot recommend his sensible, down-to-earth video reviews highly enough.

I have yet to experience the Panasonic Lumix DC-G95 aka G91 and G90 depending on territory, and so greatly appreciate his thoughts on this value-for-money camera that appears to be an excellent lower-cost alternative to the Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 or GH5.

In my experience, Micro Four Thirds cameras are ideal for immersive documentary and photojournalism work as well as Super 16-style documentary moviemaking, and Panasonic’s high-end and mid-level Lumix cameras are great solutions especially as they appear to be almost invisible to onlookers and subjects more accustomed to 35mm sensor DSLRs, especially if designed with the pro-quality Panasonic Lumix GX8’s size and form factor.

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  • Olympus Micro Four Thirds LensesB&H
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  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-G85 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera with 12-60mm LensB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital CameraB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-G95 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 12-60mm Lens B&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital CameraB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera with 12-60mm LensB&H
  • Panasonic Micro Four Thirds LensesB&H
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Booray Perry: Why I WON’T be switching to the Fuji XT-3. REAL WORLD TEST!

I’ve had a week to shoot with the Fuji XT-3 and I love this camera… but I WON’T be buying it because there is just one think I can’t get past. Maybe it doesn’t affect you but it’s the one thing that is holding me back. This video will walk you through the things I love and explain in detail why I just can’t make the leap to the Fuji XT-3.

fujifilm_x-t3_14_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS kit zoom lens.: bigger and easier-to-grip dials meaning far less diving into the multi-level menu system.

Wedding photographer Booray Perry recently tried out a loaner Fujifilm X-T3 mirrorless camera and decided that, though he likes much about the camera and the image quality from its APS-C sensor, he will not be investing in a higher-end Fujifilm camera just yet, especially given he relies on on and off-camera flash and long lenses for much of his professional work.

I have been trying out a Fujifilm X-H1 camera body lately in combination with my own and a couple of loaner Fujinon XF prime lenses, and I agree with much of what he says including that the X-T3 produces excellent images in general.

fujifilm_x-t3_01_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujifilm VG-XT3 Vertical Battery Grip and Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS kit zoom lens: although the much-improved NPW-126S lithium battery delivers more stills shots than its predecessor, video drains the battery faster so I recommend the vertical battery grip for its two extra batteries.

I have used some of the larger Fujifilm zoom lenses on loaner X-T3 cameras, as well as a number of Fujicron and non-Fujicron prime lenses, and have concluded that the X-T3 benefits from almost permanently attaching a Fujifilm VG-XT3 Vertical Battery Grip to it whether shooting documentary stills, documentary video and especially portrait photographs.

My preferred Fujifilm camera form factor for documentary photography remains that of the X-Pro2 digital rangefinder given my extensive background with analog rangefinders of all film formats, but have found that the X-T3 makes an excellent on-location documentary companion camera when using wider focal lengths than 18mm and longer focal lengths than 56mm.

But not too long.

Ungripped, the X-T3 is about the same size as the X-Pro2 and fits neatly with the latter into a small shoulder bag with four or so lenses, aiding in retaining a large degree of invisibility.

Passers-by rarely if ever take any notice of either camera and I have shot stills and video extremely up-close in a way I would ever have gotten away with if using larger cameras such as my Canon EOS 5D Mark II.

The X-T3 has proven to be an excellent handheld portrait camera, benefitting from its tilting LCD monitor, small size in the hand whether gripped or ungripped, and however large the lenses used on it.

fujifilm_vg-xt3_vertical_battery_grip_10_1024px
Fujifilm X-T3 with VG-XT3 Vertical Battery Grip. The 3×4 aspect ratio of Micro Four Thirds is much better than the 2×3 aspect ratio of APS-C and 35mm sensors for vertical portraits and is close to the aspect ratio of magazine pages. We need 4:3/3:4 added to aspect ratio choices in all APS-C and 35mm sensor cameras via firmware, and possibly also the A4 aspect ratio.

For all-day work on location or in the studio, though, I found the X-T3 more fatiguing in whichever grip and lens configuration than my X-Pro2 and I would much prefer a camera of the shape and size of the Fujifilm X-H1 for that type of work.

The X-H1 has a surety of grip and a smooth shutter release button that I would love to see on the X-T3, and there is nothing so reassuring as always having the option of the X-H1’s in-body image stabilization given that none of my current Fujinon lenses come with optical image stabilization.

The X-T3 outstrips the X-H1 in every processor and sensor-based firmware feature, hardly surprising given the X-H1 contains previous generation internals as well as firmware features moviemakers and photographers have been requesting for ages now.

The lack of IBIS on the X-Pro2 and X-T3 will soon be met with up to six stops OIS on the coming Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens, easing my trepidation when needing to shoot in available darkness but I am keen to see what the X-H2 offers when it hopefully appears sometime early in 2020.

And then there is the X-Pro3 reportedly coming later this year and whatever new features may appear thereon.

fujinon_xf_16-80mm_f4.0_r_wr_ois_01_1024px
Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens with up to six stops of stabilization, equivalent in 35mm sensor format terms to 24mm through to 120mm focal lengths.

If the X-H2 matches and preferably outstrips the X-T3 in its internals, then it will be a shoo-in for professional video production, studio stills and large lens work on location as well as documentary work in available darkness.

If the X-Pro3 gains the features I have long been wanting to see in Fujifilm’s digital rangefinder cameras, especially in a radically improved electronic viewfinder, then I will be glad to add one to my documentary stills kit.

Meanwhile the X-T3 is a fine candidate for top-quality non-raw Super 35 video in HLG or F-Log, and an excellent stills camera for portraiture and as a second available-light documentary camera whose APS-C X-Trans sensor matches as near as damn it to the image quality from my 5D Mark II and subsequently released DSLR cameras.

Fujifilm X-Pro2, X-T3 and X-H1 APS-C/Super 35 mirrorless hybrid cameras and lenses at Compact Camera Meter

camerasize_fujifilm_x-pro2_x-t3_x-h1_1920px

Footnote

The term “Fujicron” refers to the Leica Summicron-like compact prime lenses made by Fujifilm including the Fujicron XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR, XF 23mm f/2.0 R WR, XF 35mm f/2.0 R WR and XF 50mm f/2.0 R WR. Fujifilm needs to release a Fujicron version of its XF 18mm f/2.0 R prime lens in response to the longterm barrage of requests from the army of documentary photographers who rely on its 28mm equivalent focal length in the 35mm sensor format, but who find the operational speed and other quirks of the current, ageing 18mm lens irksome to say the least.

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Fuji Rumors: Fuji Guy Billy: APS-C Crop Factor Cheating? :: f/2 X Mount Zoom Lenses? :: Fast G Mount Lenses Potentially Coming :: And More

https://www.fujirumors.com/fuji-guy-billy-aps-c-crop-factor-cheating-f-2-x-mount-zoom-lenses-fast-g-mount-lenses-potentially-coming-and-more/

… XF16-80mm f/4

  • XF16-80mm f/4 is going to be an all in one beautiful lens, great for stills and video
  • coming later this year [September]…
  • Billy loves images with blown out background, and subjects to stand out, hence he brings prime lenses. Prime lenses also are sharper
  • Often Billy does not bring a zoom lens
  • Slowing down with primes, gets him more keepers
  • with zoom lenses he tends to get too lazy, just stand, zoom, and snap images
  • He would sacrifice primes to get 1 zoom for long hikes or so
  • He looks forward to XF16-80. Sharp lens, great all-rounder…
  • Zoom lenses can make things “easy”, but if you stick to constantly choose the frame, to work on the picture, you can get great images with zooms
  • If you struggle to find your frame, set your zoom to one focal length, and shoot only with that, so you start to take pictures more consciously…
fujinon_xf_16-80mm_f4.0_r_wr_ois_06_1024px.jpg
Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens.

Commentary

Although I am primarily a prime lens user in whichever camera system and sensor size, zoom lenses containing just the right focal lengths are invaluable when the two-camera, two-primes solution or swapping prime lenses from camera to bag and back again is out of the question when shooting documentary video and stills in fast-moving and intensive, highly immersive situations.

panasonic_leica_dg_vario-summilux_10-25mm_f1.7_aspheric_g9_01_1024px
Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 with Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric wide to standard zoom lens.

The Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR for Fujifilm’s APS-C/Super 35 cameras and the Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric for M43/Super 16 cameras including those made by Blackmagic Design, Olympus and Panasonic are two such zoom lenses and both have been highly anticipated since their in-development announcements a while ago.

Fuji Guy Billy is a respected in-house commentator on Fujifilm’s hardware and firmware, and it is reassuring to read his own assessment of the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS W, supported by videos featuring photographers working in different genres while using the lens.

I look forward to the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS W’s arrival in-store and into the hands of well-qualified independent reviewers soon.

Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR

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Matt Seuss: Goodbye Sony! It wasn’t you, it was Olympus. Why I Switched, Part 1

https://mattsuess.com/goodbye-sony-wasnt-you-was-olympus-why-i-switched-part-1

…So I’ve been shooting with full-frame cameras for 17 years now and here we are in 2019, when full-frame cameras are taking over the popularity contest and Sony in particular has been killing it in well earned reviews, why would I even consider switching to micro four-thirds – a sensor size that is tiny compared to a full-frame sensor? Why would I leave the Sony a7R3 with it’s 42MP (and just announced Sony a7R4 60MP camera) and switch to the Olympus OM-D E-M1X and it’s tiny 20MP sensor?…

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Olympus OM-D E-M1X Micro Four Thirds mirrorless digital camera with Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm f/2.8 Pro zoom lens, equivalent in the 35mm sensor format to 80mm to 30mm.

View this post on Instagram

And so it begins – my switch from Sony full-frame to @getolympus micro four-thirds – with the arrival yesterday of just the beginning of my Olympus collection. First up – the awesome OM-D E-M1X camera and M.Zuiko 12-100mm f4 Pro lens. In addition to the great features and image quality of this camera, the ergonomics and feel of this camera body are the best I’ve seen in many, many years – probably going way back to the film days with my Nikon F4. It is a far better feel than any digital camera I’ve used or owned, and there are lot of cameras on that list since I switched to digital full-time back in 1999! A lot of people have been asking me why I’m switching, and I’ll be going into depth on that in blog posts coming later this month so stay tuned! But in the meantime scroll through my Facebook posts through the beginning of April to get an idea 😉. #getolympus #omdem1x #micro43 #micro43rds #micro43photography  #m43 #bozemanphotographer #mzuiko12100mm #mzuiko12100mmf4ispro

A post shared by Matt Suess Photography (@mattsuessphoto) on

Commentary

The Micro Four Thirds sensor system co-founded by Olympus and Panasonic over a decade ago is particularly well-suited to documentary photography and moviemaking as well as to the wildlife photography practised by Matt Seuss.

Recent M43 cameras like the Olympus OM-D E-M1X and Panasonic’s DMC-G9 with their multi-exposure high-resolution modes have become attractive to landscape photographers needing to produce big, really big, prints and I look forward to high res evolving rapidly so it is more applicable to in-studio and on-location portraiture as well.

Meanwhile I applaud Mr Seuss’ choice to invest in Olympus’ excellent M.Zuiko Pro prime and zoom lenses for M43 cameras including those made by Olympus and Panasonic as well as Blackmagic Design on its Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K.

Olympus’ M.Zuiko Pro lenses are excellent for stills and video, especially due to their manual clutch focus mechanism with hard stops at each end, a feature I wish to see on all lenses for cameras in all sensor formats from now on.

It has been good to see Panasonic finally get the memo on manual clutch focus with their first M43 attempt at including it as a key feature on the Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric zoom, a lens I have been hoping would eventually appear ever since I invested in the Micro Four Thirds system.

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Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric wide to standard zoom lens.

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Richard Wong: Panasonic Leica 10-25 mm f/ 1.7 In-Depth Review

“Panasonic Leica 10-25mm 1.7 is the fastest zoom lens from Panasonic/Leica. How is it’s build quality, image quality (sharpness,vignetting,CA,flare,distortion..etc)? Could this be a great lens for videographers or vloggers? How does it compare to the Leica prime lenses and what are the pros and cons of this lens? We’ll talk about all of these in this review.”

panasonic_leica_dg_vario-summilux_10-25mm_f1.7_aspheric_01_1024px
Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric wide to standard zoom lens.

Links

  • 4/3 RumorsPanasonic Leica 10-25mm f/1.7 In-Depth Review by Richard Wong
  • Photo by RichardPanasonic Leica 10-25mm f/1.7 Review – article – “When Panasonic told me about this lens, they told me this is a lens that can replace multiple prime lenses. I was skeptical because zoom lens rarely can match the quality of prime lens. But after testing this lens, I agree with them. If you are a pro photographer or videographer who is currently rely on multiple prime lenses within this focal length range, I think you should consider switching to this amazing lens. It would make your life a lot easier without sacrificing the image quality.”
  • Richard WongPanasonic Leica 10-25 mm f/ 1.7 In-Depth Review – video

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News Shooter: Panasonic S1H full-frame mirrorless 6K 24p (UPDATED)

https://www.newsshooter.com/2019/06/01/panasonic-s1h-full-frame-mirrorless-6k-24p/

panasonic_lumix_dc-s1h_01_1024px
Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H 35mm mirrorless camera with Panasonic Lumix S 24-105mm f/4.0 Macro OIS zoom lens.

“…It’s best to think of the S1H as an S1 on steroids. Make no mistake though, unlike the S1 and S1R, the LUMIX S1H was designed and developed especially for film production.

The S1H is far from ready for consumers. Panasonic is only showing a prototype of the camera here at Cinegear. Just like they did with the S1 and S1R, this is more of a tease than anything else. The camera isn’t expected to be available until Autumn 2019….”

Commentary

8sinn_cage_gh5_scorpio_02_1406px
Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 with 8Sinn cage and Scorpio handle and rod riser. Like camcorders, the GH5’s fully-articulated LCD monitor can be positioned exactly where you need it to be.

News Shooter is the first video production industry website to which I turn for detailed information about coming and newly released hardware and as usual they have done a fine job digging into the facts about the Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H video camera, currently in development for release later this year.

One of the few disappointments about the S1H’s slightly older siblings, the S1 and S1R, is their lack of the fully-articulated LCD monitor upon which I rely on so much when shooting stills and video on Panasonic’s Lumix GH series cameras as well as my GX8.

It is so good to see, from the evidence of a photograph in this article shot by the News Shooter team at Cinegear 2019, that the S1H has such a monitor.

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Panasonic Global: Panasonic Develops a New LUMIX S1H Full-Frame Mirrorless Camera With Cinema-Quality Video and the World’s First 6K/24p*1 Recording Capability [Press Release]

https://news.panasonic.com/global/press/data/2019/06/en190603-2/en190603-2.html

panasonic_lumix_dc-s1h_01_1024px
Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H 35mm mirrorless camera with Panasonic Lumix S 24-105mm f/4.0 Macro OIS zoom lens.

Panasonic Develops a New LUMIX S1H Full-Frame Mirrorless Camera With Cinema-Quality Video and the World’s First 6K/24p*1 Recording Capability

Osaka, Japan – Panasonic Corporation announced today the development of the LUMIX S1H, a new Digital Single Lens Mirrorless camera equipped with a full-frame image sensor. It is the world’s first camera capable of video recording at 6K/24p *1 (3:2 aspect ratio), 5.9K/30p (16:9 aspect ratio), and 10-bit 60p 4K/C4K.*2 *3 Combining the professional-level video quality and high mobility of the mirrorless camera, Panasonic will release the LUMIX S1H to world markets in fall 2019.

Since starting the development of video recording technologies for digital cinema in the 1990s, Panasonic has produced a host of innovative technologies for impressive cinematic imagery, such as 24p video recording, slow motion video using a variable frame rate, and the wide dynamic range and color space of V-Log/V-Gamut. Panasonic has been working with film creators for over a quarter of a century to design and develop a number of cinema cameras, which has resulted in stunningly high video performance. The LUMIX GH1 made its debut in 2009 as the world’s first Digital Single Lens Mirrorless camera capable of full-HD AVCHD video recording.*4 The LUMIX GH4 was launched in 2014 as the world’s first Digital Single Lens Mirrorless camera*5 capable of 4K video recording. And in 2017, the LUMIX GH5 was released with the world’s first 4K/60p, 4:2:2 10-bit 4K/30p recording capability.*6 The LUMIX GH5 is highly acclaimed by film creators for its high performance, excellent mobility, and superb versatility in film production.

The new LUMIX S1H has been designed and developed by applying the vast expertise and technologies accumulated in the cinema cameras of the LUMIX S Series of full-frame mirrorless cameras. It packs all of these technologies, especially in the field of digital signal processing and heat dispersion, into a compact, lightweight body to achieve both high performance and nimble mobility. It opens the door to creative film production in ways that conventional, bulky camera systems simply could not do.

The main features of the new LUMIX S1H are as follows:

1. High resolution up to 6K for multiple formats
Maximizing the use of the pixels in the full-frame image sensor, the LUMIX S1H, as a digital camera, has achieved 6K/24p (3:2 aspect ratio) or 5.9K/30p (16:9 aspect ratio) video recording for the first time in the world.*1 It is also the world’s first full-frame digital interchangeable lens system camera*1 to enable 10-bit 60p 4K/C4K *2*3 video recording. It accommodates a variety of recording formats, including 4:3 Anamorphic mode, to meet professional needs. Its high-resolution data can also be used for creating 4K videos with higher image quality or for cropping images in 4K.

2. Rich gradation and a wide color space virtually equal to those of cinema cameras.
The LUMIX S1H features V-Log/V-Gamut with a wide dynamic range of 14+ stops, which are virtually the same as those of the Panasonic Cinema VariCam, to precisely capture everything from dark to bright areas. The color and even the texture of human skin are faithfully reproduced. Designed under consistent color management, the S1H’s recorded footage is compatible with V-Log footage recorded by VariCam or V-Log L footage recorded by LUMIX GH5/GH5S.

3. High product reliability that allows unlimited video recording.*7
In every S1H recording mode, video can be recorded non-stop under the certified operating temperature so the user can concentrate on shooting.
Panasonic now offers three innovative models in the LUMIX S Series of full-frame Digital Single Lens Mirrorless cameras – the S1R, the S1, and the new S1H. The LUMIX S1R is ideal for taking high-resolution pictures, the LUMIX S1 is an advanced hybrid camera for high-quality photos and videos, and the LUMIX S1H is designed and developed especially for film production. With this lineup, Panasonic is committed to meet the demands of every imaging professional by challenging the constant evolution of the photo/video culture in today’s new digital era.

The LUMIX S1H prototype will be exhibited at the “Cine Gear Expo 2019.”*8

Notes:
*1. As a digital interchangeable lens system camera, as of May 31, 2019 (U.S.). Panasonic research.
*2. As a full-frame digital interchangeable lens system camera, as of May 31 May, 2019 (U.S.). Panasonic research. In Super 35mm-equivalent size.
*3. Corresponding to 4K (4096×2160) as defined by Digital Cinema Initiatives (DCI).
*4. As of March 25, 2009, as a digital interchangeable lens system camera. Panasonic research.
*5. As of March 25, 2014, as a Digital Single Lens Mirrorless camera. Panasonic research.
*6. As of January 25, 2017, as a digital interchangeable lens system camera. Panasonic research.
*7. Recording time varies depending on the battery capacity and memory card capacity. When the camera’s temperature rises above the specified operation temperature, the camera may automatically stop video recording to protect it from heat damage.
*8. Cine Gear Expo 2019 is the premier annual event for professionals engaged in the technology, entertainment and media industry to be held at Paramount Studios in Los Angles, U.S., through May 30 to June 2.
– Design and specifications are subject to change without notice.

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FUJIFILM X Series: FUJIKINA 2019 Tokyo / FUJIFILM [Video]

“Live streaming of “FUJIKINA 2019 TOKYO” hosted by FUJIFILM.”

fujifilm_gfx_100s_03_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm GFX 100 with Fujinon GF 32-64mm f/4 R LM WR zoom lens. This lens is equivalent to 25-51mm in the 35mm sensor format.

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DPReview: CP+ 2019 Panasonic interview: ‘We’re proud of our cameraness’

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/0078977575/cp-2019-panasonic-interview-we-re-proud-of-our-cameraness

“The CP+ 2019 trade show in Yokohama, Japan, gave us the chance to speak to most of the major camera makers. Panasonic put forward an extensive team to discuss the company’s move into the full-frame market….

… it’s clear that Panasonic wants its S1 and S1R to appeal specifically to professional stills photographers. When it comes to video, the company’s plans seem less well-developed. For now, at least, it seems that Panasonic sees the GH series as its main video/stills camera platform.”

Commentary

panasonic_leica_10-25mm_f1.7_zoom_00314329_1920px_80pc
Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 wide angle zoom lens for Micro Four Thirds cameras. This is the very first zoom lens by any maker that provides the most necessary focal lengths for documentary photography and video, and it doubtless will feel right at home on a Lumix GH5, GH5S, G9 and the coming GH6 as well as the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K.

If by “cameraness” Panasonic means that one can pick up a Lumix S1 or S1R, feel at ease with it and start shooting good photographs or movie footage right away, then I agree with the company’s use of that word.

Here is an event where I tried out the S1 and here is the other event where I tried out an S1R, both times shooting decent photographs almost immediately after the most cursory inspection of the cameras’ controls.

Of course, that ease of use is based partly on my years-long familiarity with Panasonic’s Micro Four Thirds Lumix cameras and partly on Panasonic’s even longer history of constantly improving its cameras and lenses all by itself and in collaboration with Leica Camera AG.

Cameras and lenses by both companies share DNA and it was inevitable, in retrospect, that their long partnership would deepen into the L-Mount Alliance, pleasantly drawing lens maker Sigma in to the equation along with its wide range of top-class prime and zoom lenses for cinematography and photography.

When Panasonic staff members asked me for my first impressions of the S1 and S1R at a couple of touch-and-try events in Sydney earlier this year, my first thought was that both would be very usable cameras if I were still working in magazine editorial portrait and documentary photography where 35mm sensors are king.

That is no mean achievement for the first version of any new product range, and I look forward to seeing how Panasonic’s current S-Series cameras and their successors develop.

If I need to get back into 35mm sensor photography and video, I know where to go.

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