New Hardware: SmallRig Side Handle with Remote Trigger for Panasonic Mirrorless Cameras 2934

SmallRig Side Handle with Remote Trigger for Panasonic Mirrorless Cameras 2934 is designed to provide a comfortable grip and features a record button on top to control camera start/stop.

Compatibility:
Panasonic S5/S1/S1R/S1H
Panasonic GH4/GH5/GH5S
Panasonic G9/G95

Key Features:
1. Ergonomic Control Handle for Selected Panasonic Cameras.
2. Start/Stop Remote Trigger Button.
3. 1/4″-20 & 3/8″-16 & Cold Shoe Accessory Mounts.
4. Features Slots for Cable Tethering.
5. Adjusts up & down with Sliding Connector.
6. Integrated Allen Wrench Stores Inside the Grip.

smallrig_panasonic_remote_handle_01_1024px
SmallRig Side Handle with Remote Trigger for Panasonic Mirrorless Cameras 2934. Image courtesy of SmallRig.

Commentary

This long-awaited remote cable side handle for a range of Panasonic Lumix Micro Four Thirds and 35mm sensor aka “full frame” or “full format” hybrid stills/video cameras is in pre-order at time of writing with a 15% discount so get there soon to secure one.

This device looks well-designed and well-executed, and it is now on my production accessories wishlist.

Expected release date is November 16, 2020.

You may wish to consider adding a second wooden side handle to create a two-handed rig, such as the SmallRig Universal Wooden Side Handle 2093.

Links

Peter Forsgård: Panasonic 10-25mm F1.7 – [FASTEST Wide-Angle Zoom] – video – Commentary

Panasonic 10-25mm F1.7 is the fastest Wide-Angle Zoom for MFT bodies…. Panasonic 10-25mm f1.7 lens was introduced in Photokina 2018. It was not until May 2019 when it was officially launched. It [is] the fastest wide-angle zoom for MFT.

Correction: This unique lens is better described as the fastest wide-to-standard zoom lens.

panasonic_leica_dg_vario-summilux_10-25mm_f1.7_aspheric_01_1024px
Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric wide to standard zoom lens. Image courtesy of Panasonic Australia.

The recent publication by 4/3 Rumors of Peter Forsgård’s intro video about the Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric reminded me that I had yet to try one out myself or even simply clap eyes on one in our ever diminishing local camera stores.

Time, I thought, to look deeper into this intriguing lens to determine if I should place it on my documentary stills and video hardware wishlist, or forgo it in favour of that other uniquely fast zoom lens, the Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art lens.

panasonic_leica_dg_vario-summilux_10-25mm_f1.7_aspheric_g9_01_1024px
Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 with Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric wide to standard zoom lens. I would love to try out this combination in the field for documentary stills and video storytelling. Some say that the lens somehow works better with the G9 than with the GH5 or GH5S. Image courtesy of Panasonic Australia.
olympus_m-zuiko_pro_collection_2017_1024px_80pc
The Olympus M.Zuiko Pro professional prime and zoom lens collection as of late 2017, all with manual clutch focus, invaluable for fast, accurate and repeatable manual focusing as well as linear focus-by-wire and autofocus. Image courtesy of Olympus Australia.

Peter Forsgård has yet to produce a more in-depth video about the lens and his results with it, and there is the fact that he is using it on Olympus OM-D cameras rather the more videocentric Lumix GH5, GH5S  and G9 hybrid cameras from Panasonic for which the lens was clearly designed.

Its clickless aperture ring only works on Panasonic Lumix cameras but clickless is of more use for moviemaking than stills photography and Olympus seems to have fallen well behind Panasonic in the video half of the hybrid camera equation.

Australian/American Director of Photography and Olympus Visionary John Brawley is one of the few I have encountered who shoots serious video with that brand’s hybrid cameras but I can better understand his love of Olympus lenses, especially the Olympus M.Zuiko Pro professional-quality collection with the lenses’ manual clutch focus via retractable ring and hard stops at each end of the focusing scale.

I spotted the Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric zoom lens at SMPTE’s Metexpo in July 2019 but could not borrow it for a quick tryout at the show. Pity, as I still have some unanswered questions about it.
fujinon_xf_50mm_f1.0_r_wr_06_1024px
Will Panasonic’s DFD autofocus approach the speed of PDAF autofocus camera systems some day? Fujinon XF 50mm f/1.0 R WR on Fujifilm X-Pro3. Image courtesy of Fujifilm Australia.

The Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric is Panasonic’s very first manual clutch focus lens and not before time.

Focus-by-wire only lenses can be problematic for moviemaking with some more unusable than others although they can work acceptably for stills photography especially when relying on back-button focus in manual focus aka MF mode.

I have not done much video using autofocus on any camera and lens combination, partly because I only had manual focus during the analog era and became comfortable with it, and more to the point because autofocus on video and hybrid cameras was unreliable up until recently.

panasonic_lumix_dc-s5_08_1024px
Has the S5 improved Panasonic’s DFD autofocus enough yet? Panasonic Lumix DC-S5 with Panasonic Lumix S 20-60mm f/3.5-5.6 zoom lens. Image courtesy of Panasonic Australia.

I still set my cameras to manual focus by default when prepping for a project, and the unpredictability of documentary photography and moviemaking means I often need to snap into manual focus in an instant, easily done by rapidly retracting the focusing ring.

Hard stops in manual focusing mean I can train myself in approximating the right focus point fast without looking at the focusing scale, then refine focus through the viewfinder or monitor.

The Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric, on the other hand, allows its focusing ring to travel beyond extreme left or right of the focusing scale, and I remain unsure as to the usefulness of this behaviour.

A question only firsthand experience can answer.

Gerald Undone: Panasonic 10-25mm f/1.7 Lens Review (vs Sigma 18-35 + Speed Booster)

sigma_18-35mm_f1.8_canonEF_01_1024px
Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art EF-mount fast zoom lens can be adapted for a range of Super 35/APS-C cameras or for cameras with larger sensors that can be set to Super 35/APS-C. Image courtesy of Sigma Australia.

Mr Undone is currently the first and sometimes only YouTube reviewer I watch these days and his in-depth, fast-talking rundowns amply reward the effort.

The highly adaptable Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art EF-mount fast zoom lens is high up on my wishlist for use with several camera systems and sensor sizes, but the lure of one lens with a focal range from 10mm through 14mm, 17mm, 20mm and 25mm is strong.

In 35mm sensor terms that equates to 20mm, 28mm, 35mm, 40mm and 50mm, only lacking my longer favourite focal lengths of 75mm and 105mm.

The lens’ image quality at each of those focal lengths is reportedly almost as good as that of pro-quality premium-priced lenses such as Olympus’ M.Zuiko Pro 17mm, 25mm and 45mm primes, a feat only matched by Fujifilm’s shorter Red Badge zooms.

I will keep looking for reviews and videos about Panasonic’s Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7, but I found Gerald Undone’s comparison with Sigma’s 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art zoom lens the most useful so far.

There are pros and cons to both lenses and the choice depends on these currently unanswered questions about the 10-25mm:

  • Exactly how much curvature is there at its wide end of lens? I find too much curvature irritating especially when the frame contains horizontal parallels and I am following a figure walking through it.
  • How much vignetting is there at all focal lengths but most especially at the wide end?
  • How well is skin rendered by it given not all lenses are equal in doing this?
  • Does the lens have that classic warm and three-dimensional Leica lens micro-contrast and resolution?
  • I love the idea of an emotive wide-angle closeup on a face and upper body using a wide aperture to throw figure and background into stark contrast, but how well does the lens render this look?
  • Why did we not have a choice between clicked and clickless aperture ring given de-clicked works best for video while clicked is best for stills?
  • Is Panasonic working on the perfect companion for the 10-25mm, a similarly-designed 25-50+mm f/1.7 zoom lens?
  • I am accustomed to hard stops at each end of the focusing scale on manual clutch focus lenses, but how useful or not are the 10-25mm’s software stops?
  • Although I still rely heavily on manual focus for video and back-button focus for stills, great autofocus in both modes certainly has its uses. Will Panasonic’s reliance on DFD aka depth-from-defocus instead of PDAF aka phase-detection autofocus continue to be its Achilles’ Heel?

Questions remain about the viability of the Micro Four Thirds system given Olympus’ recent sale of its camera and lens division to JIP and Panasonic’s big investment in 35mm SLR-style cameras.

panasonic_lumix_gx8_square_waterspray_1024px_60%
The Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 12mm f/1.4 Aspheric prime lens is well-balanced on the GX8. Image courtesy of Panasonic Australia.

Panasonic staffers say that work continues on the company’s M43 cameras and lenses, but where is the much-requested pro-quality successor to the GX8 rangefinder-style hybrid workhorse, and when can we expect the GH6?

With the Lumix DC-S5, Panasonic has demonstrated it can make 35mm sensor cameras smaller than its M43 cameras.

If Panasonic follows the same path with the successors to its other two first generation S-Series cameras, the S1R and the S1H, will there be less incentive to stick with M43?

Right now I love the choice between the GH-series and G-series M43 cameras’ Super 16 and 35mm film handling and aesthetics, and those of the S-Series cameras’ Super 35 and 120 roll-film look and feel.

But DxO’s PhotoLab raw editing software and Topaz Labs’ Gigapixel AI image enlargement application radically reduce the need for larger sensors to produce better image quality.

Likewise, I wonder how much difference is really noticeable onscreen between Super 16 4K and Super 35 4K.

sigma_50-100mm_f1.8_canonEF_01_1024px_80pc
Sigma 50-100mm F1.8 DC HSM | Art APS-C zoom lens.

Panasonic’s Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 may be an amazing M43-only lens with an incredibly useful focal range for documentary stills and video, but Sigma’s 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art zoom lens is adaptable to a range of Super 35/APS-C and Super 16/M43 cameras, helping future-proof one’s investment in lens and adapters.

Furthermore, the 18-35mm already has a longer companion lens in the form of Sigma’s 50-100mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art zoom, though there is no obvious companion lens on the wide end though there is that gap between 35mm and 50mm.

Links

Press Release: Introducing The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f/5.0-6.3 IS Lens

I remember that the very first time I encountered Micro Four Thirds systems cameras and lenses in a trade show, Olympus was demonstrating just how much smaller and lighter its telephoto zoom lenses were compared those made for so-called “full frame” and “full format” 35mm sensor system cameras. 

This lens, had it been available when that trade show was on, would have been a superb example of why M43 has so much to offer with its 200-800mm focal range in a package the average human being can actually pick up and use without breaking one’s spine and afford without breaking the bank.

Introducing The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f/5.0-6.3 IS Lens

A Superior Compact, Lightweight Super telephoto Zoom Lens Offering, 200-800mm Focal Length (35mm Equivalent)

Center Valley, PA, August 4, 2020 – Olympus® is pleased to announce the M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS lens, an ultra-compact, lightweight super-telephoto zoom lens that covers a broad telephoto focal length of 200-800mm equivalent[1] and is compliant with the Micro Four Thirds® System standard. This lens features the same dustproof and splashproof performance as the M.Zuiko PRO lens series, and when paired with the M.Zuiko Digital 2x Teleconverter MC-20, delivers up to 1600mm equivalent1 super telephoto shooting. This lens offers superior autofocus performance, even handheld, and in-lens image stabilization for the optimal shooting experience.

Compact, Lightweight Design

Despite being a 200-800mm equivalent super telephoto zoom lens, the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS lens is compact and lightweight, with a length of 205.7 mm, a weight of 1,120 g6 and a filter diameter of 72 mm. The M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS lens is capable of 200-800mm equivalent1 telephoto shooting on its own, which can be further extended when paired with the optional (sold separately) M.Zuiko Digital 1.4x Teleconverter MC-14 or the M.Zuiko Digital 2x Teleconverter MC-20, for up to 1600mm equivalent1, making it possible to zoom in close on subjects that are difficult to approach, such as birds and wildlife, and delivering flattening effects for shooting that is unique to a super telephoto lens. The closest focusing distance across the entire zoom range is 1.3m and the maximum image magnification is 0.57×1, allowing superb telemacro performance when photographing small subjects such as insects and flowers. Focus Stacking[2] is also supported. This feature captures multiple shots at different focal positions and automatically composites a single photo with a large depth of field that is in focus from the foreground to background.

Focal length
35mm equivalent

Aperture Value

Max Image Magnification
35mm equivalent

M.ZUIKO DIGITAL ED 100-400㎜ F5.0-6.3 IS

200mm-800mm
(100mm-400mm)

F5.0-F6.3

X0.57
(X0.29)

With 1.4x Teleconverter MC-14

280mm-1,120mm
(140mm-560mm)

F7.1-F9.0

X0.81
(x0.4)

With 2.0x Teleconverter MC-20

400mm-1600mm
(200mm-800mm)

F10-F13

X1.15
(x0.57)

Superb Performance

The optical system of the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400mm f5.0-6.3 IS lens features a combination of four ED lenses[3] for suppressing color bleeding, two Super HR lenses[4], and two HR lenses[5] for bright, clear depictive performance to the edges of the image across the entire zoom range. ZERO (Zuiko Extra-low Reflection Optical) Coating is used to reduce ghosting and flaring, for clear image quality, even in poor, backlit conditions. Extensive hermetic sealing on the entire lens barrel delivers the same high level of dustproof and splashproof performance as the M.Zuiko PRO series for peace of mind when shooting in any environment.

Superior Autofocus

A rear focus system is employed to drive this lightweight focusing lens, for fast, high-precision autofocus performance. This lens is also equipped with four functional switches, designed to support handheld shooting, including a Focus Limiter switch for AF operation selection, ranging between three levels, according to the focusing distance, allowing for quick focusing and comfortable shooting, even in the super telephoto range. In-lens image stabilization on/off delivers stable handheld super telephoto shooting, an AF/MF switch and a zoom locking switch.

Pricing, Availability & Specifications

The Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 100-400 f5.0-6.3 IS lens will be available for $1,499.99 (U.S.)/$2,199.99 (CAD). To pre-order, visit a participating local authorized retailer, or http://www.getolympus.com. Shipping will begin September 8, 2020. Please visit the website for detailed product specifications: https://www.getolympus.com/lenses/m-zuiko-digital-ed-100-400mm-f5-0-6-3-is.html.

Journalists who are interested in more information or review units should contact Jennifer Colucci, Olympus America Inc., jennifer.colucci@olympus.com, 484-896-5719, or visit the Olympus website getolympus.com.

Bundled Accessories

Lens Hood: LH-76D
Lens Cap: LC-72D

Separately Available Accessories

Lens Hood: LH-76D (Bundled) $39.99 (U.S.)/$54.99 (CAD)
Protect Filter: ZUIKO PRF-ZD72 PRO $79.99 (U.S.)/$107.99 (CAD)
Decoration Ring: DR-79 $24.99 (U.S.)/$24.99 (CAD)
Lens Case: LSC-1127 $44.99 (U.S.)/$44.99 (CAD)

ABOUT OLYMPUS AMERICA INC.

Olympus is passionate about the solutions it creates for the medical, life sciences, and industrial equipment industries, as well as cameras and audio products. For more than 100 years, Olympus has focused on making people’s lives healthier, safer and more fulfilling by helping detect, prevent, and treat disease, furthering scientific research, ensuring public safety, and capturing images of the world.

Olympus’ imaging business empowers consumers and professionals alike with innovative digital cameras, lenses, audio recorders, and binoculars. The company’s precision optics and groundbreaking technology open up new possibilities for capturing life’s most precious moments. For more information, visit http://www.getolympus.com.

All trademarks and registered trademarks listed herein are the property of their respective holders, in the U.S. and/or other countries.

Olympus…True to You. True to Society. True to LIFE.

© 2020 Olympus America Inc.

# # #

1 35mm equivalent
2 Please see the Olympus website for compatible cameras
3 Extra-low Dispersion lens
4 Super High Refractive Index lens
5 High Refractive Index lens
6 Excluding tripod base plate, lens cap, lens rear cap, and lens hood

Links

David Thorpe: A Look At The Olympus 12-40mm f/2.8 Pro Zoom for Micro Four Thirds Cameras – Commentary

I bought this lens some time after it came out so never thought to reviews [sic] it. Quote a few photographers have taken me to task about that so here, at last, is my take on it. There’s no shortage of standard zooms for Micro Four Thirds but the Olympus 12-40mm f/2.8 Constant Aperture Pro zoom should be towards the top of any buyer’s list.

olympus_12-40mm_f2-8_02_1024px_60pc
Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 Pro standard zoom lens.

Former Fleet Street newspaper photographer David Thorpe remains one of the very best digital camera and lens reviewers on YouTube and I thoroughly recommend him for those interested in the Micro Four Thirds format. 

He has to buy the gear that he reviews so he makes somewhat infrequent appearances on his YouTube channel and limits his coverage to the Olympus and Panasonic cameras and lenses that he uses for his own freelance work.

Likewise, Panasonic Australia seems to have fallen off in it support for local reviewers while Olympus Australia has never been interested in helping out with review units, so my current coverage of both company’s hardware and firmware is limited to items that I already own, or based on articles by others.

Thank goodness, then, for reviewers like David Thorpe and others too numerous to list here!

Other M43 lenses that David Thorpe uses and recommends

I own two of the six lenses that receive high recommendations from David Thorpe, the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 Pro standard zoom and the Panasonic Lumix G Vario 12-32mm f/3.5-5.6 Aspheric near-pancake sized collapsible standard zoom.

Both have their joys and their workarounds, but both are firmly established as my default zoom lenses for different reasons and different subjects and applications.

Foremost amongst their differences is that the M.Zuiko Pro 12-40mm f/2.8 can be purchased standalone or bundled with a high-end Olympus camera while the 12-32mm f/3.5-5.6 can only be purchased bundled with a lower-end Panasonic camera.

I managed to find my 12-32mm zoom lens online at eBay Australia, bought it for a good price, and have been very happy with it ever since.

It is not a lens for all seasons though, lacking a manual focusing ring and an aperture ring, and with a 37mm filter diameter so narrow that it necessitates stacking step-up rings to get it to industry-standard 77mm or 82mm or investing in a set of smaller diameter fixed and variable neutral density filters.

For those reasons I have yet to create videos with my 12-32mm lens, relying instead on the Olympus 12-40mm f/2.8 with its 62mm filter diameter, excellent manual clutch focusing, solid build, beautiful optics, and great weather and dust resistance.

Despite the effectiveness of Panasonic Lumix cameras’ back button focus, I have often resorted to retracting my 12-40mm’s manual clutch focus ring to quickly zero in on a key detail, and the usefulness of fast and accurate manual focusing when shooting video cannot be disputed.

The one thing that stops the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 Pro from being the perfect standard zoom lens for stills and video is its lack of an aperture ring.

Aperture rings are one of the major areas where Micro Four Thirds consortium partners Olympus and Panasonic appear to have begged to differ, with Olympus lenses have them not at all and Panasonic building them into some and not all of their lenses.

One of the most intriguing Panasonic lenses with a form of manual clutch focus is the company’s Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric wide-to-normal zoom lens.

I had the chance to briefly try one out at the last SMPTE in Sydney and while the lens’ range from 20mm to 50mm equivalent is impressive and incredibly useful for documentary photography and video, I was a little nonplussed by the lens’ lack of hard stops at each end of the focusing scale.

Hard stops aid in easier, faster focusing when your eyes are glued to the camera’s EVF or LCD monitor, as I quickly discovered after investing in my 12-40mm f/2.8, but if I was buying into Micro Four Thirds video nowadays then Panasonic’s Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric would be the first and possibly only lens I would buy alongside a Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5,  DC-GH5S or the coming DC-GH6.

If I had the funds and the need for more M43 lenses with manual clutch focus and autofocus capabilities, though, then I would certainly invest them in Olympus’ excellent though aperture-ringless M.Zuiko Pro primes and zooms, so impressive is their optics and performance.

olympus_m-zuiko_pro_collection_2017_1024px_80pc
The Olympus M.Zuiko Pro professional prime and zoom lens collection as of late 2017, all with manual clutch focus, invaluable for fast, accurate and repeatable manual focusing as well as linear focus-by-wire and autofocus.

Links

Press Release: Olympus Unveils the Latest M.Zuiko Digital Lens Roadmap and Updates the Development of M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25x IS PRO

Olympus’ M.Zuiko Pro professional-quality lenses for Micro Four Thirds cameras are just one step away from perfect, in my humble opinion. 

The one thing that stops Olympus M. Zuiko Pro lenses from being absolutely perfect is their absence of aperture rings with the option of being set to clicked or de-clicked for stills photography and video respectively. 

I am looking forward to further details emerging about the Olympus M. Zuiko Digital ED 8-25mm f/4.0 Pro wide-angle zoom lens as well as other coming lenses denoted by graphics in the lens roadmap such as “Bright Prime Lenses”. 

Olympus Unveils the Latest M.Zuiko Digital Lens Roadmap and Updates the Development of M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25x IS PRO

Olympus Corporation (President: Yasuo Takeuchi) is pleased to announce the latest lens roadmap for M.Zuiko Digital lenses that conform to the Micro Four Thirds System standard, and provide an update on the development of the M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25x IS PRO lens of which the development was announced in January, 2019.

The development on the M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25x IS PRO lens was announced in January 2019. Development of this lens continues with an estimated scheduled release of this winter. The final image design of the product is now available.

Furthermore, to make super telephoto shooting more convenient, the development is under way to add Bird detection to Intelligent Subject Detection AF on the Olympus OM-D E-M1X. The firmware is scheduled for release this winter.

Olympus will continue enhancing the lens lineup to make full use of the unrivaled portability made possible by the compact, lightweight, high image quality of the Micro Four Thirds System.

News Release Details (PDF: 650.2KB)

Summary of contents

  1. The latest lens roadmap for Olympus M.Zuiko Digital Lens
  2. Updated information of M.Zuiko Digital ED 150-400mm F4.5 TC1.25x IS PRO
  3. Development of future firmware upgrade to support Bird detection AF

Links

Press Release: Olympus releases the long-awaited ED 12‑45mm F4 PRO and a video content creation kit with its E-M5 Mark III, New OM-D E-M5 Mark III kits

Olympus appeared to emphasize the  stills photography capabilities of its OM-D range of digital cameras more than their video features. 

I have always had a high opinion of the company’s M.Zuiko Pro professional-quality prime and zoom lens collection most especially due to their manual clutch focus mechanism which is particularly useful for moviemaking. 

Now Olympus appears determined to remind us that their camera also shoot video too, and to demonstrate that fact have released two moviemaking kits, in the UK and Ireland at least if not in the rest of the world. 

olympus_om-d_e-m5_markiii_01_1024px
Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III OMD Movie Kit.

Hamburg, 05/15/2020 | Press release | Camera & audio

Olympus releases the long-awaited ED 12‑45mm F4 PRO and a video content creation kit with its E-M5 Mark III
New OM-D E-M5 Mark III kits

A few weeks ago, Olympus launched the world’s most compact and lightweight high-performance standard zoom lens M.Zuiko Digital ED 12‑45mm F4 PRO.* In combination with the also compact and lightweight OM-D E-M5 Mark III camera, unrivalled mobility is now possible. The acclaimed weather-sealing allows for shooting in all conditions. This ideal combination will be available as a kit from mid-May, for all photo enthusiasts looking for professional quality in a handy format. The new OM-D movie kit with the E-M5 Mark III and the LS-P4 audio recorder is ideal for all vloggers, filmmakers and YouTubers who rely on top quality gear and like to travel light. The kit centers around the versatile E-M5 Mark III camera with high-performance autofocus capabilities: a powerful image stabilization system and “OM-D Movie” features, which deliver an extensive array of creative options for filmmakers. Also included are the wide-angle M.Zuiko Digital ED 12mm F2.0 lens and an Olympus LS-P4 linear PCM recorder, to ensure brilliantly clear sound, as well as further accessories to guarantee a worry-free video content creation experience.

At up to half the size and weight of other interchangeable lens systems, Olympus’ biggest advantage is its optimal mobility owing to the compact camera system and lenses. The combination of the high-resolution, high-performance lens line-up and powerful image stabilization results in sharp, high-quality videos and photos for a variety of scenarios.

Packing some of the latest imaging technologies in a highly compact body, the OM-D E-M5 Mark III represents these benefits to the fullest and is therefore the perfect choice for every photo and vlogging enthusiast on the go.

OM-D E-M5 Mark III 12‑45mm F4 PRO kit

One compact and lightweight lens for many possibilities

The optical configuration of the M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-45mm F4.0 PRO lens is inherited from the ED 12-40mm F2.8 PRO lens, which is well recognized for its high-quality standards. Effective placement of special lenses in the M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-45mm F4.0 PRO lens allows for the world’s most compact, lightweight design*, covering a focal length from wide angle 24mm to telephoto 90mm (35mm equivalent). A small and lightweight focusing lens enables high-speed, precise AF for any subject. Aspherical lenses and ZERO (Zuiko Extra-low Reflection Optical) coating drastically reduce aberrations, ghosts, and flares for sharp, high-definition image quality. Suppressing loss of light at the edges of images makes it possible to obtain a bright, clear depictive performance over the entire image.

Superb macro capabilities

The M.Zuiko ED 12-45 mm F4.0 PRO is also suitable for macro photography with a maximum magnification of 0.25x (0.5x 35mm equivalent) across the entire zoom range. The closest focusing distance is 12 cm at the wide-angle end, and 23 cm at the telephoto end. Diverse macro effects are possible, such as Focus Stacking****, which generates a single image in the camera with a large depth of field in focus from the foreground to the background.

The perfect match

The new flexible standard zoom lens is the solution for all those who want to achieve maximum performance with as little equipment as possible. It fits perfectly to the OM-D E-M5 Mark III, which is just as flexible, compact and light. It features a weather-sealed construction, high-performance autofocus capabilities and a powerful image stabilization system, along with versatile shooting features to deliver brilliant image quality and an extensive array of creative options for photographers and filmmakers.

The OM-D movie kit

All video producers know about the importance of sound. The Olympus LS-P4 audio recorder is the perfect match for the E-M5 Mark III and helps creatives to complement their production with Hi-Res audio quality.

Why the Olympus movie kit is the ideal choice for aspiring video content creators

Advanced imaging technology in an ultra-small body and a high-quality wide-angle lens ensure the versatility modern video creators need.

Being one of the most compact and lightweight wide-angle lens kits in its class, the OM-D E-M5 Mark III with the M.Zuiko Digital ED 12mm F2.0 lens can easily be carried everywhere to make sure no video shot is missed.

The camera’s in-body 5-axis image stabilization system ensures that moving images look even clearer and sharper by compensating for unwanted camera-shake.

Olympus’ highly precise 121-point all cross-type on-chip Phase Detection autofocus (AF) system brings out the full potential of the distinguished MSC (Movie & Still Compatible) mechanism, enabling fast and quiet autofocusing in M.Zuiko lenses without “jumping” focus. Thus, the focus in a film scene can no longer be lost, the result: sharp results in almost any situation or environment.

With the E-M5 Mark III’s swivel touch LCD, creatives and vloggers maintain full control of the framing and background as well as quick and easy access to a control panel with the most important settings – even when taking a selfie shot or holding the camera high or low.

Due to the direct and easy connection of the E-M5 Mark III with Olympus’ acclaimed LS-P4 sound recorder, video enthusiasts have the choice to record sound directly onto the movie file and upload it right away, or to combine sound and video in post production. Full compatibility and easy synchronization are guaranteed since both the camera and the audio recorder are genuine Olympus products.

Superior sound makes any movie better: The Olympus LS series ensures crisp, brilliant audio for video

The Olympus LS series is renowned for its compact, sleek design and exceptional sound quality. Offering better-than-CD quality recording allowing for a frequency spectrum of up to 20Hz – 20kHz, the LS-P4 ensures a rich stereophonic sound.

At loud volumes, the capability of handling sound pressure levels (SPL) of up to 120dB without clipping as well as the acclaimed Olympus noise cancelling system come into play.

With a near perfect sampling rate of up to 96 kHz/24-Bit sound PCM, FLAC or MP3 recording***** (and playback), the LS-P4 is a feature-packed high-resolution audio recorder. It brings together high quality of sound with ultimate ease of use and flexibility – making it the ideal companion for video production on the go.

With the new firmware Version 1.10 for the LS-P4, a Slate Tone function has been added to make sound file editing / video synchronization easier, while the new Test Tone feature supports users in adjusting the recording level for optimal results. By using Olympus Workspace Version 1.3 it is easy to replace the audio files of the recorded video to High res sound recorded by using Slate Tone.

An included Joby GorillaPod and further accessories take the versatility and convenience for video creators to the next level

In addition to the E-M5 Mark III camera, the high-quality M.Zuiko Digital ED 12mm F2.0 lens, a metal lens hood to minimize the risk of reduced contrast and flares from sunlight, the Olympus LS-P4 sound recorder and further useful accessories; the new movie kit includes a Joby GorillaPod to place the camera on almost any surface or to support hand-held shooting.

When capturing sound for video, the LS recorder may be used as separate hand-held device or, utilizing the included shock mount adapter (Olympus SM2) and 3.5mm cable (Olympus KA335), as a flexible microphone on top of the camera to save on synchronization efforts in post-production. The included windshield offers protection from wind noises when filming outdoors.

For more information on shooting video content with Olympus cameras and sound recorders please visit www.olympus.eu/video_sound.

Availability & pricing

The new OM-D 12‑45mm F4 PRO kit is available from mid of May at an RRP of 1,599.00 EUR. The OM-D movie kit is available now at an RRP** of 1.999,00 EUR. The included OM-D cameras and M.Zuiko lenses come with a free six-month warranty extension****** when registered via the MyOlympus platform at http://my.olympus.eu.

Selected accessories

The OM-D E-M5 Mark III is fully compatible with Olympus’ extensive range of Micro Four Thirds lenses and accessories, including tailor-made camera bags, electronic flashes and the free image editing and workflow software Olympus Workspace and smartphone app OI.Share.

More information at www.olympus.eu/accessories.

Product specifications are subject to change without notice. Please check the Olympus website at www.olympus-europa.com for the latest specifications.

* As of February 12, 2020. World’s most compact, lightweight standard zoom lens with a constant aperture value.

** Recommended Retail Price

*** With M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm F4.0 IS PRO at a focal distance of f=100mm (35mm equivalent: f=200mm), halfway release image stabilization: Off, frame rate: high speed. CIPA standards compliant on 2 axes (Yaw and Pitch).

**** Supported cameras: OM-D E-M1 Mark III. A firmware update is required for the following camera models: OM-D E-M1X, OM-D E-M1 Mark II, OM-D E-M5 Mark III

***** 96 kHz/24-Bit only possible when recording in PCM or FLAC format.

****** Six months on top of the statutory warranty in the country of purchase.

Olympus OM-D E-M5 Mark III OMD Movie Kits with Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-45mm f/4.0 Pro zoom lens

Links

David Thorpe: A Look At The Panasonic G90 Micro Four Thirds Camera

“The Panasonic G90/95 sits between the smaller and cheaper GX9 and their top range G9 and GH5 models. Its predecessor, the (still available) 16Mp G80 met with many accolades. Does the 20Mp G90/95 render obsolete the G80? Or should you skip this one and wait for a G10?”

panasonic_lumix_dc-g90_g91_g95_01_1024px
Panasonic Lumix DC-G95 with Panasonic Lumix G Vario 12-60mm f/3.5-5.6 Aspheric Power OIS zoom lens and Panasonic DMW-BGG1 Battery Grip.

Commentary

Former Fleet Street newspaper and magazine photographer David Thorpe is one of the best and most quietly-spoken video reviewers of Micro Four Thirds cameras and lenses, lately supplemented with Panasonic’s L-Mount 35mm sensor-equipped mirrorless cameras and lenses, and I cannot recommend his sensible, down-to-earth video reviews highly enough.

I have yet to experience the Panasonic Lumix DC-G95 aka G91 and G90 depending on territory, and so greatly appreciate his thoughts on this value-for-money camera that appears to be an excellent lower-cost alternative to the Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 or GH5.

In my experience, Micro Four Thirds cameras are ideal for immersive documentary and photojournalism work as well as Super 16-style documentary moviemaking, and Panasonic’s high-end and mid-level Lumix cameras are great solutions especially as they appear to be almost invisible to onlookers and subjects more accustomed to 35mm sensor DSLRs, especially if designed with the pro-quality Panasonic Lumix GX8’s size and form factor.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • Olympus Micro Four Thirds LensesB&H
  • Panasonic DMW-BGG1 Battery GripB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-G85 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera with 12-60mm LensB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital CameraB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-G95 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 12-60mm Lens B&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital CameraB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera with 12-60mm LensB&H
  • Panasonic Micro Four Thirds LensesB&H

Veydra LLC, Maker of Affordable Manual Focus Mini Prime Cinema Lenses, Is Dead. What Now for Lenses in Their Class?

Veydra LLC, maker of the Veydra Mini Prime manual-focus cinema lenses for Micro Four Thirds, Sony E-Mount and Fujifilm X-Mount cameras, is no more. 

Veydra’s Ryan Avery recently announced the company’s demise on its Facebook page, bringing to an abrupt end the story of this doughty little lens maker, throwing into confusion affordable native geared cinema prime lens choices for independent moviemakers. 

With its mission statement being “Veydra lenses are designed to be premium quality cinema lenses at the absolute minimum retail price”, Veydra gave thousands the opportunity of using cinema lenses instead of the more common stills-oriented  non-cinema zoom and prime lenses we have come to rely upon despite their shortcomings for video use. 

veydra_miniprime_metric_imperial_01_1920px
Veydra 50mm and 25mm Mini Prime Cinema manual focus lenses with imperial or metric markings, made by Veydra LLC.

Veydra LLC has gone out of business due to the conclusion of ongoing litigation between the founders of the company.

I offer special thanks to everyone involved in the success of Veydra; first and foremost all Veydra Kickstarter backers and customers. Specific thanks to those who made it possible from the start; Phil Holland, Illya Friedman, Matthew Duclos, Joshua Brown, Alex Jacobs, and all the supporters too numerous to mention here.

It’s been a wonderful journey and I thank you all for your support and kindness.

—Ryan Avery
Co-Founder

veydra_7_lenses_composite_new_1920px_60.jpg
Veydra Mini Prime colour-matched, geared manual-focus cinema prime lenses, from left, 12mm T2.2, 16mm T2.2, 19mm T2.2, 25mm T2.2, 35mm T2.2, 50mm T2.2 and 85mm T2.2 for Micro Four Thirds and APS-C sensor cameras.

Social media rumours have it that there was some conflict at Veydra about one partner licensing his lens designs out to another company, Meike, but another factor leading to Veydra’s end may have been the theft of US$200,000 worth of lenses from the company’s warehouse in 2017, after which the company seemed to drop off the radar.

There are cinema prime lens alternatives, however, with SLR Magic releasing an intriguing set of lenses for Super 16 and Super 35  digital cameras in M43, E-Mount and X-Mount.

Another option is Fujifilm’s impressive MKX cinema zoom lenses available in two focal length ranges and now in the same there mounts.

Should Fujifilm continue delivering on its promise to radically improve video functionality on its XF APS-C/Super 35 cameras,  SLR Magic’s seven lens collection appears attractive with the lenses’ 18mm, 22.5mm, 27mm, 37.5mm, 52.5mm and 112.5mm equivalence in the 35mm sensor format.

So far Meike has only released three cinema prime lenses and not in all three mounts, in 12mm, 16mm and 25mm focal lengths, so time will tell whether the company is fully committed to supplying a full set of primes in three mounts.

A prime lens alternative? SLR Magic MicroPrime Cinema Lenses for Micro Four Thirds, Fujifilm X-Mount and Sony E-Mount.

A cinema zoom alternative? Fujifilm Cinema Zoom Lenses for Micro Four Thirds, Fujifilm X-Mount and Sony E-Mount.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

Matt Seuss: Goodbye Sony! It wasn’t you, it was Olympus. Why I Switched, Part 1

https://mattsuess.com/goodbye-sony-wasnt-you-was-olympus-why-i-switched-part-1

…So I’ve been shooting with full-frame cameras for 17 years now and here we are in 2019, when full-frame cameras are taking over the popularity contest and Sony in particular has been killing it in well earned reviews, why would I even consider switching to micro four-thirds – a sensor size that is tiny compared to a full-frame sensor? Why would I leave the Sony a7R3 with it’s 42MP (and just announced Sony a7R4 60MP camera) and switch to the Olympus OM-D E-M1X and it’s tiny 20MP sensor?…

olympus_om-d_e-m1x_07_1024px
Olympus OM-D E-M1X Micro Four Thirds mirrorless digital camera with Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm f/2.8 Pro zoom lens, equivalent in the 35mm sensor format to 80mm to 30mm.

View this post on Instagram

And so it begins – my switch from Sony full-frame to @getolympus micro four-thirds – with the arrival yesterday of just the beginning of my Olympus collection. First up – the awesome OM-D E-M1X camera and M.Zuiko 12-100mm f4 Pro lens. In addition to the great features and image quality of this camera, the ergonomics and feel of this camera body are the best I’ve seen in many, many years – probably going way back to the film days with my Nikon F4. It is a far better feel than any digital camera I’ve used or owned, and there are lot of cameras on that list since I switched to digital full-time back in 1999! A lot of people have been asking me why I’m switching, and I’ll be going into depth on that in blog posts coming later this month so stay tuned! But in the meantime scroll through my Facebook posts through the beginning of April to get an idea 😉. #getolympus #omdem1x #micro43 #micro43rds #micro43photography  #m43 #bozemanphotographer #mzuiko12100mm #mzuiko12100mmf4ispro

A post shared by Matt Suess Photography (@mattsuessphoto) on

Commentary

The Micro Four Thirds sensor system co-founded by Olympus and Panasonic over a decade ago is particularly well-suited to documentary photography and moviemaking as well as to the wildlife photography practised by Matt Seuss.

Recent M43 cameras like the Olympus OM-D E-M1X and Panasonic’s DMC-G9 with their multi-exposure high-resolution modes have become attractive to landscape photographers needing to produce big, really big, prints and I look forward to high res evolving rapidly so it is more applicable to in-studio and on-location portraiture as well.

Meanwhile I applaud Mr Seuss’ choice to invest in Olympus’ excellent M.Zuiko Pro prime and zoom lenses for M43 cameras including those made by Olympus and Panasonic as well as Blackmagic Design on its Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K.

Olympus’ M.Zuiko Pro lenses are excellent for stills and video, especially due to their manual clutch focus mechanism with hard stops at each end, a feature I wish to see on all lenses for cameras in all sensor formats from now on.

It has been good to see Panasonic finally get the memo on manual clutch focus with their first M43 attempt at including it as a key feature on the Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric zoom, a lens I have been hoping would eventually appear ever since I invested in the Micro Four Thirds system.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

panasonic_leica_dg_vario-summilux_10-25mm_f1.7_aspheric_01_1024px
Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric wide to standard zoom lens.

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 4KB&H
  • Olympus Mirrorless Digital Cameras B&H
  • Olympus Mirrorless Lenses B&H
  • Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 ASPH. LensB&H