Fujifilm GFX 50R Medium Format Rangefinder-Style Camera Touch and Try Event at Ted’s World of Imaging, Sydney, Thursday 1st November 2018

Warrewyk Williams of Fujifilm Australia presented the Fujifilm GFX 50R Touch and Try event at Ted’s World of Imaging in Sydney. Photograph copyright Karin Gottschalk 2018, all rights reserved.

Fujifilm Australia’s Warrewyk Williams arrived at the Touch and Try event at Ted’s World of Imaging in Sydney last night with one of the few, if not the only, Fujifilm GFX 50R medium format rangefinder-style digital cameras along with a selection of G Mount lenses, Fujifilm GFX 50S DSLR-style medium format camera, Fujifilm X-H1, Instax printers and more. 

The event provided an opportunity for a brief but informative hands-on with the GFX 50R with the proviso that the camera is a pre-production model with pre-release firmware and so comes with possible quirks and operating speed reductions. 

This event was particularly welcome as I have not had the opportunity to touch or try the X-H1, GFX 50S or any of Fujifilm’s Instax products, given the closure of our local top-end camera stores, and I have long been hoping and waiting for a digital version of Fujifilm’s justly loved and celebrated “Texas Leica” 120 roll film analog cameras of the past. 

fujifilm_gfx_50r_18_1024px_60pc
Fujifilm GFX 50R with Fujinon GF 45mm f/2.8 R LM WR lens, equivalent to 35mm in 35mm format.

Some “Texas Leica” medium format rangefinder cameras from the analog era, made by Fujifilm, Bronica and Mamiya

Fujifilm, as well as Bronica and Mamiya, made some remarkable 120 roll film rangefinder cameras with Fujifilm producing a huge variety of “Texas Leicas” in the 6×4.5cm, 6x6cm, 6x7cm, 6x8cm and 6x9cm formats and for all I know may well have produced 6x9cm and 6x12cm cameras too.

I continue to search for top quality photographs of these and other cameras in the hopes of preserving some of the camera-building achievements of the past, some of which may trickle down to the present day.

The Fujifilm GFX 50R has clearly benefited from Fujifilm’s analog innovations, its look and feel reminding me of the company’s larger 120 roll film cameras while also sharing a great deal of the X-Pro2’s own DNA.

Fujifilm GFX 50R Touch and Try

Reeling off a few snapshots with an unfamiliar and pre-production camera is hardly a thorough real-world test but the experience reminded me that documentary photography and portraiture with a medium format camera is a very different thing to making the same sorts of photographs with a small, fast, agile, gestural camera like the X-Pro2 or X-T3.

Making reportage and portraits photographs with the GFX 50R and GFX 50S is more akin to how I used to work handheld with my Hasselblad, Mamiya 7 and even my Crown Graphic 4″x5″ sheet film 4field camera – slower, more deliberate and with fewer shots than I would make on APS-C or Micro Four Thirds cameras.

I tried two lenses, the Fujinon GF 45mm f/2.8 R WR and the Fujinon GF 120mm f/4.0 Macro R LM OIS WR in emulation of the two-lens moderate wide and medium telephoto kits I had for my medium and large format analog cameras.

I learned that, aside from the coming-soon Fujinon GF 50mm f3.5 R LM WR pancake lens, equivalent to about 40mm in the 35mm sensor format, more wide prime lenses are planned for GF mount cameras along with the  Fujinon GF 45-100mm f/4.0 R LM OIS WR and Fujinon GF 100-200mm f/5.6 R LM OIS WR zoom lenses currently slated for 2019 and 2020 releases on Fujifilm’s G Mount Lens Roadmap.

The Fujifilm GFX 50R is, for me, a combination rangefinder-style and small field view camera, for use primarily handheld but also on a portable but sturdy tripod such as 3 Legged Thing’s Winston or those made by Really Right Stuff, for making environmental and full-face portrait photographs.

My quick and dirty test shots indicate that it has the image quality of an analog sheet film camera rather than a 120 roll film camera, and I would prefer to use prime lenses with it rather than zooms.

Warrewyk Williams estimates the focal length equivalence factor at 0.79 for Fujifilm’s G Mount lenses, making the 45mm equivalent to 35.55 in 35mm terms and the 120mm equivalent to 94.8 in 35mm terms.

Other lenses worth considering for my sort of portrait photography include the Fujinon GF 110mm f/2.0 R LM WR equivalent to 86.9mm and hopefully a soon-to-come 35mm GF lens equivalent to 28mm.

Not to be discounted is the Fujinon GF 32-64mm f/4.0 R LM WR zoom lens which provides at least three useful focal lengths for different forms of portraiture, in 35mm equivalent terms 28mm, 35mm and 50mm, and is available right now rather than waiting for fast prime lenses to come.

A two or three lens kit for the GFX 50R may be all I would need for portraiture should I invest in digital medium format.

While it is too early too come to conclusions about the GFX 50R and its lenses, I have been particularly struck by the superb 3D image rendering in the available light snapshot portrait of Warrewyk Williams above and am very much looking forward to exploring more of the creative possibilities of Fujifilm’s GFX camera and lens system very soon.

Links

Image Credits

Portrait of Warrewyk Williams made by Karin Gottschalk on Fujifilm medium format camera with Fujinon GF 120mm f4.0 R LM OIS WR Macro lens as five autoexposure brackets processed in Skylum Aurora HDR 2019 with film emulation LUT applied and further processing in Skylum Luminar.

Documentary photographs made by Karin Gottschalk on Fujifilm X-Pro2 with Fujinon XF 23mm f/1.4 R lens.

Header image of GFX 50R made by Jonas Rask for Fujifilm.

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links below and purchasing through them or our affiliate accounts at B&H Photo Video, SmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

  • Fujifilm Fujinon G Mount lensesB&H
  • FUJIFILM GFX 50R Medium Format Mirrorless CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM GFX 50S Medium Format Mirrorless CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM VG-GFX1 Vertical Battery GripB&H
  • 3 Legged ThingB&H
  • Really Right StuffB&H
Advertisements

Fujifilm EU: Fujifilm unveils the latest development of the “X Mount Lens Roadmap”

https://www.fujifilm.eu/uk/news/article/fujifilm-unveils-the-latest-development-of-the-g-mount-lens-roadmap

“Enhancing the “GFX System” further by expanding the GF lens line-up. Fujifilm unveils the latest development of the “G Mount Lens Roadmap”, the interchangeable lens range for the “GFX 50S” medium format mirrorless digital camera….”

Links:

FujiRumors: Firmware Updates for Fujifilm GFX 50S, X-Pro2, X-T2, X-T20 and X100F Available – with COMMENTARY

http://www.fujirumors.com/firmware-updates-fujifilm-gfx-50s-x-pro2-x-t2-x-t20-x100f-available/

“Fujifilm just released new firmware that fixes the following issues:

The phenomenon is fixed that in the MF mode, repeated halfway shutter pressing can shift the focus point under a specific exposure condition.

The phenomenon is fixed that in the AF-S mode, repeated halfway shutter pressing can shift the focus point with SHUTTER AF setting OFF….”

Commentary:

Whenever possible I wait until a number of reports are in from other users on new firmware updates before applying the update to my own cameras. Websites like FujiRumors and their social media channels are invaluable in that regard.

I have held off on applying the version 3.11 firmware update to my X-Pro2 until more user reports are in. So far there have been reports that, post-update, “the EVF is laggy, even in High Performance mode, and the image ‘sticks’ in the screen while shooting. Also the pop-up screen for the hybrid OVF sticks up while the EVF is active, and performance slows considerably.”

Another user has reported slower face detection and focus confirmation beeps even when the lens in not in focus after installing the firmware update on his X-Pro2 and X-T2.

Links:

Fuji Rumors: Big Fujikina Event in Toyko September 7, 2017

http://www.fujirumors.com/big-fujikina-event-toyko-september-7-2017/

“Earlier this year, on January 21, Fujifilm launched the first “Fujikina” event in Kyoto, Japan. On that event, Fujifilm also announced the Fujifilm GFX and more.

Well, Fujifilm just officially announced a new Fujikina event, this time in Toyko on September 7, 2017. If you want, you can sign-up now for the event….”

Fujifilm Australia: Cashback of $900 via redemption when you purchase a new FUJIFILM GFX 50S and trade in a qualifying camera

https://fujifilm.cashback.com.au/125

“FUJIFILM Australia announced today that a cashback offer of $900 will be available to photography enthusiasts with the purchase of a new GFX 50S medium format camera and the trade in of a qualifying camera from participating retailers during a limited promotion period that will run from 7 August 2017 to 30 September 2017.

By trading in a qualifying camera and purchasing a new FUJIFILM GFX 50S from a participating Australian retailer during the promotion period, purchasers will be eligible to claim $900 cashback via redemption.

The qualifying trade in camera must be in working order as validated by the participating retailer at the time of purchasing the FUJIFILM GFX 50S. Purchasers will then be issued a unique serial number. To take advantage of the limited special offer, purchasers then need to visit http://www.fujifilm.com.au and click on the link to the cashback website page where they can complete the online registration form. All cashback claims must be received by midnight AEDST on 15 October 2017. The cashback will be paid by electronic fund transfer or cheque within 28 days….”

Links:

Capture One Pro 10.1 Update Improves Fujifilm X-Trans Support, Enhances Styles Workflow, and More

Phase One has released its first major update of the year for raw processing powerhouse application Capture One Pro, making its latest version 10.1, and it brings a slew of new and improved features. My two favourites of the list are a major enhancement to CP1’s styles workflow and greatly improved, speed-boosted support for Fujifilm’s X-Trans sensor cameras such as the X-Pro2 and X-T2. But wait, there’s more, including improvements to CP1’s support for Photoshop .PSD files for those who finish their images in Adobe’s image editing software, a before/after function via a temporary adjustment’s reset, tokenized image watermarking and new Applescript support. Lastly, C1P adds support for a range of cameras including the Sony A9, Fujifilm X-T20 and the Panasonic Lumix GH5, and lenses from a range of camera and lens makers. 

Snapshot made on my X-Pro2 from a walk along the sunny ridge road near our former home across the valley. I chose the Provia Sternfeld film simulation by Peter Dareth Evans for the JPEG and in-camera preview then processed the raw file in Capture One Pro 10.1 using presets by Image Alchemist and the 012 Kodak Portra 160 film simulation style from Alexander Svet’s Capture One Film Styles Extended.

One of those newly-supported lenses is the Panasonic Lumix G 25mm f/1.7 Aspheric standard lens that came with my Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 in a Panasonic Australia marketing promotion. The 25mm f/1.7 is an underestimated lens that I have come to appreciate especially attached to the GX8 when I use it to simulate shooting with a Rolleiflex twin lens reflex camera, the GX8’s EVF tilted upwards for discrete waist level shots in city crowds. I look forward to seeing C1P’s support for it in action soon.

The GX8 and its tilting EVF may be the closest we will come to the Rolleiflex waist level shooting style in the digital era, though the Fujifilm GFX 50s’ optional EVF tilt adapter may be a good simulation in combination with the camera’s 1:1 aspect ratio setting and its GF63mmF2.8 R WR standard lens.

Capture One Pro 10.1’s much improved Styles and Presets functionality

I am far from expert in the many ins and outs of Phase One’s Capture One Pro raw processor, so best to hand you over to three of the Capture One Pro experts in Alexander Svet of Capture One Film Styles, Paul Steunebrink of Image Alchemist and Phase One’s Image Quality Professor.

For me the most impressive improvement in Capture One Pro 10.1 is its handling of styles and presets. In previous versions, whipping through and previewing the effect of presets and styles on your images was a messy affair with the image covered with dropdown menu items to the point where the image was barely visible. Version 10.1 locates all your styles and presets, built-in, custom and third-party, in its own Styles and Presets tool, neatly arranged to find them more easily without occluding the image upon which you are working.

Links:

Image Credits:

Header image processed in Alien Skin Exposure X2 using the Kodachrome 35mm old preset.

Fujifilm: The GFX system expands further with exceptional glass: Fujifilm announce FUJINON GF110mmF2 R LM WR and GF23mmF4 R LM WR

https://www.fujifilm.eu/uk/news/article/the-gfx-system-expands-further-with-exceptional-glass-fujifilm-announce-fujinon-gf110mmf2-r-lm-wr-and-gf23mmf4-r-lm-wr-1

“FUJIFILM Corporation (President: Kenji Sukeno) has today announced that it will release the FUJINON GF110mmF2 R LM WR Lens and FUJINON GF23mmF4 R LM WR Lens in June 2017. Both products are professional interchangeable lenses for GFX 50S 43.8×32.9mm format digital camera. Fujifilm has also unveiled new accessories to complement the GFX system….

… The FUJINON GF110mmF2 R LM WR Lens is a medium telephoto lens for portraits. With a focal length equivalent to 87mm in the 35mm format, it achieves a brightness of F2.0 when used wide open to deliver beautiful bokeh. The high resolving power of the area in focus and the rich bokeh unique to medium-format fast-diameter lenses depicts portraits with a realistic three-dimensional feel.

The FUJINON GF23mmF4 R LM WR Lens has a focal length equivalent to 18mm in the 35mm format and is perfectly suited for landscape and architectural applications. Despite the super-wide angle of view, distortion is kept to a minimum, and with the high-resolution performance extending all the way to the edges, the resulting image is outstandingly sharp….”

Gerhard Witteveen demonstrates Fujifilm GFX 50S Cambo Actus Technical Camera Combo for Studio Product Shots

One of the most exciting outcomes of the arrival of Fujifilm’s GFX 50S medium format camera is its support by view camera makers like Cambo, effectively turning the GFX into a digital back for use with adapted lenses and shutterless lenses like Combo’s manual aperture Actar range. 

I no longer have my medium format Mamiya RZ lenses, having been purloined from a shared studio in London, so Cambo’s Actar prime lens range is of particular interest as part of a view camera solution for architecture and portrait photography, as well as product photography of the sort Mr Witteveen demonstrates in his video.

The Actar range currently comprises five lenses from wide to telephoto:

I am unfamiliar with Cambo’s current technical view camera and lens product range but have fond memories of using Cambo studio view cameras in my magazine editorial portraiture days.

Links: