Fujifilm X: A Quick Look at XF16-80mmF4 R OIS WR by Huseyin Aldirmazm – UPDATED

https://fujifilm-x.com/global/stories/a-quick-look-at-xf16-80mmf4-r-ois-wr-by-huseyin-aldirmaz/

“If we consider the zoom range and fixed f4 aperture in the FUJINON lenses in this segment, to me, the most reasonable option is XF16-80mm. From wide-angle to a medium telephoto zoom range makes this lens ideal especially for street and travel photographers. Even for general architectural shots (no ultra-wide angle), the lens has high-end features that will satisfy anyone who wants to work with a single lens. Let’s look at the other details….”

fujinon_xf_16-80mm_f4.0_r_wr_ois_03_1024px.jpg
Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens.

FUJIFILMglobal: Huseyin Aldirmaz x XF16-80mmF4 R OIS WR / FUJIFILM

Commentary

fujifilm_x-h1_battery_grip_16-55mm_01_1024px_60%
Fujifilm X-H1 with VPB-XH1 battery grip and Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR professional zoom lens.

Each year I always look forward to the Sydney edition, as it were, of Fujifilm Australia’s People with Cameras event and that anticipation is no less eager this year with the event coming up for tomorrow, Saturday September 7th, 2019.

I will be carrying my trusty Fujifilm X-Pro2 and a handful of Fujifilm Fujinon prime lenses, along with an X-H1 kindly loaned by Fujifilm Australia’s PR folks.

I have been enjoying the many virtues of the X-H1, and am hoping that an X-H2 is on the horizon for release early 2020, if we are lucky.

The X-H1 in combo with my X-Pro2 is a powerful kit when engaged in documentary work and portrait photography.

The X-H1 is, of course, the better option of the two for top-quality video using the Pro Neg Standard, Eterna Cinema or F-Log profile depending on taste and need, and I highly recommend using Paul Leeming’s settings below when shooting with the X-H1, X-T3 or X-Pro2, as well as their other cameras.

When shooting video, or stills for that matter, always best to expose to the right aka ETTR in order to avoid burnout at the shoulder end of the exposure scale.

Paul Leeming’s video settings for Fujifilm cameras:

  • Pro Neg Std (best option on the X-Pro2), Eterna Cinema, F-log (or HLG for the X-T3)
  • H265 recording format
  • DR100 for all profiles
  • Highlight tone 0
  • Shadow tone 0
  • Color 0
  • Sharpness -4
  • Noise Reduction -4
  • Zebra level 100%
fujinon_xf_18mm_f2_r_01_1024px_60pc
Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0 R prime lens, regrettably much too slow to focus manually or via autofocus and its aperture ring too flakey and quirky for fast-paced professional work in stills and video, though some folks seem to like it for the quirkiness that makes it frustrating for me. I have been trying out this lens again recently but am still searching for the ideal substitute, given how crucial this 28mm equivalent focal length is for documentary cinematography and photography.

I have been hoping a lens like Fujifilm’s Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR would turn up for quite some time since acquiring my first interchangeable lens Fujifilm camera, a standard zoom lens offering better quality than the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS kit zoom which has, however, proven surprisingly good for its class though the latter is not everything I might wish for.

The X-Pro2 and X-T3’s lack of in-body image stabilization ruled out considering the Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR, a lens that appears better suited to a gripped IBIS-equipped X-H1 than the two smaller cameras.

My time in DSLR-land with the Canon EOS 5D Mark II and its Canon EF 24-105mm f/4L IS USM kit zoom lens taught me the value of lenses with optical image stabilization and a bit extra on the long end of the focal length scale when shooting documentary stills and video.

The in-development announcement of the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR came as a pleasant surprise to many of us who had been hoping for a one-lens replacement for several prime lenses when weight and size would be an issue and Hüseyin Aldırmaz’s report on his experience with a pre-production copy looks promising.

Now to the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR’s release and falling into the hands of well-qualified non-Fujifilm Ambassadors for some in-depth reviews so we have some idea of whether this is the all-purpose standard zoom lens we have been waiting for.

PostScript

DSCF1012_cameraraw_1920px
Guest at the Fujifilm Australia event, People with Cameras Sydney 2019, People with Cameras Creative Space, Doltone House, Darling Island Wharf, Pyrmont, Sydney, Saturday September 7, 2019. Photographed with Fujifilm X-T3 and Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR standard zoom lens.

I was lucky enough to spend a very short time with a pre-production model of the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR at last Saturday’s Fujifilm People With Cameras event in Sydney and can report that the lens feels good and solid with fast autofocus and good balance on the Fujifilm X-T3 upon which it was mounted.

I was asked not to save any photographs or video shot with it so my assessment is limited.

Thanks to the ever-keen eyes of the folks at Fuji Rumors, I have now added some reviews of pre-production versions of the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR to the links list below.

Enjoy, until the first in-depth reviews of the production version of this lens start appearing.

Links

  • Bill FortneyThe New Mid-Range King! – “I will cut to the chase and tell you now it will replace the 18-135 as my standard middle zoom.  In fact for my upcoming trip to the UP of Michicgn and Acadia N.P, it and the 10-24, and 100-400 will be my three zoom package. “
  • Bjorn Moerman PhotographyFUJIFILM XF16-80mm f4 REVIEW – Comparison with XF18-135 – “It might also be a replacement lens for those that presently own the XF18-55 and/or XF18-135 lens(es). Personally I’m looking at replacing my XF18-135 with the XF16-80.”
  • Fuji Rumors
  • Fuji RumorsFujinon XF 16-80mm f/4: Pros and Cons, First Looks and Thougths [sic] – contains links to Rico Pfirstinger’s eight-part article at the Fuji X Secrets Facebook page and sample images at flickr.
  • Fujifilm XFUJINON XF16-80mmF4 R OIS WR
  • Fujifilm South AfricaTHOUGHTS ON THE FUJINON 16-80MM F/4 – Anton Bosman – “For professionals who are looking for an all day carry around lens and for the traveller who is looking for a compact carrying kit, yet they still want the ability to create images that will hold their own against the best on any platform. For videographers there is good news, the lens has very little breathing.
  • FUJIFILMglobalHuseyin Aldirmaz x XF16-80mmF4 R OIS WR / FUJIFILM – video
  • Hüseyin AldırmazInstagram account
  • Hüseyin Aldırmazwebsite
  • Ivan Joshua LohXF16-80mm. – “If you are looking for a zoom lens; this could be it. Of course there is the XF18-135mm lens but I would go for the XF16-80mm. I would prefer a wider advantage than a tele. I would not use this lens professionally as the optically on a different level when compare with XF16-55mm F2.8”
  • jonasrask|photographyFujinon XF 16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR first look preview – “The XF16-80mm f/4 R WR OIS is without a doubt one of the new Fujinon XF classics. It is a phenomenal performer with great image stabilisation, and good IQ throughout the zoom range. Especially at 50-80mm. It’s sharp and has good looking out-of focus rendering. It focuses very fast and precise, and the build quality is fantastic.”
  • Leeming LUT Pro – production of Paul Leeming’s LUT pack for Fujifilm XF cameras is currently under way.
  • WikipediaExposing to the right

Help support ‘Untitled’

fujinon_xf_10-24mm_f4_r_ois_02_1024px
Fujinon XF 10-24mm f/4.0 R OIS zoom lens. A suitable mid-price mid-range wide-angle companion zoom lens for the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR.

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • FUJIFILM XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR Lens B&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR LensB&H
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DPReview: Fujifilm XF 8-16mm F2.8 WR LM Review (video)

There’s no doubt that the Fujifilm XF 8-16mm F2.8 is a beautifully built lens. It’s also quite heavy, and at £1750 / $1900 it’s a pretty serious investment. Is the expense worth it? Chris and Jordan take to the hiking trails of Alberta to answer that question….

Commentary

Fujifilm’s Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR ultra wide-angle zoom lens is beautifully built and delivers beautiful results, but it may not be the best solution for everyone needing ultra-wide focal lengths.

Its size and weight demand mounting it on a vertical battery-equipped Fujifilm X-T3 at the very least with the now-discounted Fujifilm X-H1 providing better balance than the slightly smaller and lighter X-T3.

If the X-H1’s OIS-equipped replacement, the X-H2, is in Fujifilm’s production pipeline then it may be wiser to wait for that to appear sometime late this year or more likely early next if the Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR is an important lens in your gear kit.

My experience with the XF 8-16mm f/2.8 proves it to be an excellent solution for architectural photography where street furniture, trees and other buildings dictate using the widest focal lengths to get closer to your main subject and bypass non-removable visual noise.

I have used it successfully for documentary photography in the middle of dense crowds, though there were times I would have preferred the lens had optical image stabilization built-in for when the light dropped and slow shutter speeds were necessary to support deep focus via smaller apertures.

In bright sunlight, photographing landscapes was a pleasure and the lens lapped up fine detail but its lack of provision for attaching screw-on filters meant I was unable to try it out as a video lens and I am not in the market for large, heavy and expensive third-party filter adapters or even larger and costlier matte boxes.

If you need an ultra-wideangle for documentary photography and video then I highly recommend the Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R which is small and light enough for use with an ungripped X-T3 and would work well on an X-Pro2 with a Fujifilm VF-X21 external optical viewfinder sitting on its hotshoe.

If a range of wide-angle focal lengths is necessary as well as portability and stabilization then I recommend the Fujinon XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS lens especially it is stopped down below f/5.6 and preferably f/8.0, and this lens will not eat into your savings anywhere near as much as the otherwise excellent Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links below and purchasing through them or our affiliate accounts at B&H Photo Video, SmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

  • FUJIFILM VF-X21 External Optical ViewfinderB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-H1 Mirrorless Digital Camera Body with Battery Grip KitB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-T3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM VG-XT3 Vertical Battery GripB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 14mm f/2.8 R LensB&H

Fuji Rumors: Fujikina 2019 Tokyo, May 25/26: Fujifilm GFX 100 Launch Party and More?

https://www.fujirumors.com/fujikina-2019-tokyo-may-25-26-fujifilm-gfx-100-launch-party-and-more/

“”FUJIKINA 2019 TOKYO” will be held on May 25th-26th 2019!

This event is a must-go for all GFX and X Series users. You will be able to try the latest range of GFX and X Series cameras and lenses. There will be live talks, studio demos and photo galleries showcasing the works of the professional photographers and creators from all over the world. Quick maintenance service and loan programs will be available free of charge (reservation required).

There will also be public shooting of music videos on site. The production team led by Pål Laukli will only use GFX and X Series models to complete the music video and stills. This is a rare opportunity to witness the professional at work!…”

fujifilm_gfx_100s_03_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm GFX 100S with Fujinon GF 32-64mm f/4 R LM WR zoom lens. This lens is equivalent to 25-51mm in the 35mm sensor format.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at B&H Photo Video, SmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

DPReview: EXCLUSIVE: Hands-on with upcoming Fujifilm XF and GF lenses [Including Fujifilm’s Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens] – UPDATED

https://www.dpreview.com/articles/9472614833/exclusive-hands-on-with-upcoming-fujifilm-xf-and-gf-lenses

“…We’re in Dubai, where Fujifilm is showing off pre-production and prototype samples of three upcoming lenses – the GF 50mm F3.5 – a compact, lightweight standard lens for medium format – the XF 16mm F2.8, and the XF 16-80mm F4 – both of which [were] designed for the company’s range of APS-C format X-series cameras.

Click through for an exclusive first look at all three, including detailed specifications….”

Staffers at the Amazon-owned photography hardware review site DPReview got their hands on three upcoming lenses for Fujifilm’s G and X series cameras at Gulf Photo Plus aka GPP’s GPP Photo Week 2019 in Dubai. Here is the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens.

Commentary

As time is inching towards the release sometime in the first half of 2019 of Fujifilm’s Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 “travel” zoom lens it is terrific to get some idea of its size and features and other it may provide a solution for own needs as a documentary photographer and videographer.

I am self-funded, only able to carry a small amount of hardware on each project, and must work within ongoing limitations – thanks for nothing, Australian banksters, for blowing our refinancing out of the water after you were found out for your crimes by the Royal Commission into banking.

I must be able to get the most out of the hardware I carry and it must be able to help me create good enough movies and videos without the benefit of cases full of equipment, assistants and crews, and the big budgets that I never had anyway when working as a magazine editorial and corporate photographer during the analog era.

Gaps in their offerings

As two relatively new camera and lens systems, Fujifilm’s APS-C sensor format X system and medium format G system  still have gaps in their offerings, especially for documentary types like me who prefer to rely on fast prime lenses with all the manual controls that can be had.

Not to say that I do not appreciate zoom lenses now that their optical, mechanical and image quality are so good nowadays.

I also use and love Panasonic’s Micro Four Thirds cameras and Olympus’ M.Zuiko Pro lenses, with my most-used lens being the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 Pro zoom lens and, had it been released at the time I bought my first Panasonic camera, I may well have chosen the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4.0 OIS Pro zoom lens instead.

Slower zoom lenses are fine so long as you supplement them with moderately wide and moderately long fast aperture prime lenses for available darkness documentary work and portraiture, and Olympus offers three of  them in its M.Zuiko Pro range at the moment, with more to come I hope.

Going fast to begin with

At the time I bought my first interchangeable lens Fujifilm camera, the company did not offer a standard zoom lens like those above made by Olympus or their Panasonic equivalents, so I invested in a Fujinon XF 23mm f/1.4 R and Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R, well answering my fast aperture moderate long and wide needs.

Another longstanding need has been for a professional quality 18mm prime lens equivalent to 28mm in the 35mm sensor format and 14mm in the Macro Four Thirds sensor format.

With little sign of Fujifilm offering such a lens any time soon, I have had to consider other possibilities including adapting an EF-mount Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art zoom lens to X-mount, but this solution is best suited to DSLR-style cameras like the X-T3 rather than the rangefinder-style X-Pro2 that is much more effective for hardcore immersive documentary photography.

Interest piqued

My interest in the coming  Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS zoom was piqued when I borrowed a Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 kit zoom lens for my first tryout of the X-T3.

I loved its 18mm widest focal length, rarely used the lens at 23mm and 55mm as I was also carrying my X-Pro2 equipped with either of those two lenses, and would have loved access to longer focal lengths than 56mm for those times I could not get close enough.

DPReview’s hands-on with the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom provides a reasonably reliable impression of the lens in its shipping form and confirms it has a marked, clicking aperture ring and weather resistance, though no manual clutch focus or, probably, no clickless option.

The X-T3’s firmware offers the ability to switch focus-by-wire from non-linear to linear so I will be giving that feature a tryout during my current X-T3 loan period over the coming days.

Two out of three

Two out of three ain’t bad for the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom.

As I am not a fan of the neither fish-nor-fowl 16mm focal length, equivalent to 24mm in the 35mm sensor format, the Fujinon XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR “Fujicron” lens is not on my wishlist which is topped by the Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R annual clutch focus prime lens to tackle the ultra wide end of things and has a 58mm filter diameter, meaning I can easily add a knurled brass Breakthrough Photography step-up ring for my neutral density filters when shooting video.

Although I would prefer to have a set of wide-aperture manual-clutch-focus primes for all my documentary moviemaking and photography, the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom would provide a range of my most-needed focal lengths – 18mm, 23mm, 27mm, 56mm and 70mm.

In 35mm sensor format terms, that is 28mm, 35mm, 40mm, 85mm and 105mm, and a limit of 120mm at the long end will account for those rare times my feet are unable to do the zooming.

Postscript

Fuji Rumors has republished images and information about the northern hemisphere fall aka autumn 2019 (southern hemisphere spring 2019) release of the XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR including these from Japanese website capa.getnavi.

Many thanks to Fuji Rumors for the slide translation:

Fujinon XF 10-24mm R OIS, Samyang 12mm f/2.0 NCS CS X-Mount, Fujinon XF 14mm R and Venus Optics Laowa 9mm f/2.8 Zero-D for architecture and documentary

I have a longterm project coming up where I need to document the construction of a house from greenfield to completion, and I need to expand my stills photography kit for that and a number of other upcoming stills and video projects.

Right now I have no idea what my budget will be, given the economy-wrecking predations of the Australian banks and real estate agencies over the past couple of years, but there are at least two options.

Minimalist:

  • Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R with Fujifilm VF-X21 external optical viewfinder for my X-Pro2.

Maximalist:

  • Fujifilm X-T3
  • Fujifilm MHG-XT3 Metal Hand Grip
  • Fujifilm VG-XT3 Vertical Battery Grip
  • Fujinon XF 10-24mm f/4.0 R OIS
  • Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR
  • Breakthrough Photography 72-82mm knurled brass step-up ring x 2
  • Breakthrough Photography lens cap, 82mm x 2
  • Breakthrough Photography X4 UV filter x 2
  • Fixed or variable neutral density filters, 82mm diameter

There are other lenses available that receive good reviews and are suitable for architectural photography though they are too ultra-wide for documentary photography, the Samyang 12mm f/2.0 NCS CS X-Mount at 18mm equivalence and Venus Optics Laowa 9mm f/2.8 Zero-D at 13.5mm equivalence in the 35mm sensor format.

If only one lens it is to be, then the minimalist option makes sense as I rather like the Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R’s 21mm equivalence for figures in landscapes, emotive close-up documentary shots, and architectural and cityscape work.

This lens will need Fujifilm’s VF-X21 viewfinder sitting on top of my X-Pro2 as a 14mm field of view falls outside the X-Pro2’s 18-56mm optical viewfinder bright frames and the X-Pro2’s EVF is not what I would like it to be.

Will the X-Pro3 improve upon that and other weak points?

If there is budget enough, then of course I would prefer the maximalist option camera and lens plus upgrading my ageing post-production facility.

The X-T3 plus grips and two zoom lenses, with the addition of my three current 23mm, 27mm and 56mm Fujinon prime lenses, makes a good Super 35mm video set-up combined with Fujifilm’s X-Trans 120-rollfilm quality stills.

The Fujinon XF 10-24mm f/4.0 R OIS is an ageing lens design, however, and lacks weather resistance and appears to be at its best optically speaking from f/8.0 rather than closer to f/4.0.

I want to see Fujifilm bring it up to current standards with a Fujinon XF 10-24mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom that will make a great match with the coming Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens, giving the equivalent of 15mm through to 120mm in the 35mm sensor format.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links below and purchasing through them or our affiliate accounts at B&H Photo Video, SmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

  • Breakthrough PhotographyB&H
  • FUJIFILM VF-X21 External Optical ViewfinderB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-Pro2 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-T3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM MHG-XT3 Metal Hand GripB&H
  • FUJIFILM VG-XT3 Vertical Battery GripB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 14mm f/2.8 R LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 23mm f/1.4 R LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 56mm f/1.2 R LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4 IS PRO LensB&H
  • Samyang 12mm f/2.0 NCS CS Lens for Fujifilm X-MountB&H
  • Venus Optics Laowa 9mm f/2.8 Zero-D Lens for Fujifilm XB&H

Trying Out Fujifilm’s Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R WR Ultra-Wide Zoom Lens on the X-T3

Thanks to Fujifilm Australia, I have been lucky enough to try out the Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR ultra-wide zoom in combo with the amazing Fujifilm X-T3 DSLR-style camera and its VG-XT3 Vertical Battery Grip.

My primary motivation in requesting the loan was so cinematographer/director Paul Leeming could use the X-T3 to shoot video footage in order to create a custom Leeming LUT Pro for it.

He did the same for my X-Pro 2 camera, and I am looking forward to eventually relying on Paul’s various Leeming LUT Pro 3D look-up tables to quickly and easily combine footage from those two cameras with video shot with my Panasonic cameras and, hopefully, Blackmagic Design’s Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K aka BMPCC 4K.

fujifilm_vg-xt3_vertical_battery_grip_04_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm X-T3 with VG-XT3 Vertical Battery Grip and Fujifilm XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR lens.

At the moment I am using the Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR for stills photography and for a self-funded independent documentary photographer and moviemaker I believe it is stills to which this lens is best suited.

Reason number one?

The Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR does not permit attaching circular filters.

Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR

Large and costly adapters are required in order to attach square or rectangular filters in front of the lenses convex front element, though someone may come up with a similar adapter for attaching wide diameter circular filters to it.

Another large and costly solution is to invest in a matte box, though which one may be best is beyond my current knowledge and experience.

As a budget-driven documentary video solo operator I need to keep my equipment load and expenses down so I rely on circular variable ND filters.

My current VNDs are built with ageing technology, and more recent ones are reportedly sharper, more colour-neutral and offer a greater range of filtration density stops for today’s sensors.

I want to find the best contemporary VND, need a great set of fixed density NDs for less run-and-gun style projects, and I want to upgrade from 77mm to 82mm to future-proof for coming bigger lenses.

All that aside, I absolutely love the results I have been getting with the Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR.

It balances well on a battery grip-equipped X-T3 whereas it is far too large and heavy for an ungripped camera.

I cannot comment on how it works with a gripped or ungripped Fujifilm X-H1 as I have yet to experience that particular camera.

I wish the X-T3 had the X-H1’s in-body image stabilization aka IBIS and optical image stabilization on the 8-16mm lens would have been terrific.

The X-T3’s ungripped body makes for a great companion camera to my X-Pro2 as I discovered during my first X-T3 tryout late last year, equipping the latter with a Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 alongside the former with my Fujinon XF 23mm f/1.4 R attached.

Adding a Fujifilm VG-XT3 Vertical Battery Grip to the X-T3 turns it into a great handheld portrait camera with the addition of my Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R.

But I digress.

The Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR is the first Fujifilm Red Badge zoom lens I have tried, and so far it looks like it adheres to the common praise heaped upon the Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R WR, that it is like having a set of top quality primes at your disposal but all in the one lens.

The widest lens I have ever used until now was the Fujinon XF 14mm f/2.8 R, equivalent in 35mm sensor terms to one of my favourite focal lengths for immersive documentary photography and video, 21mm.

The Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR goes well beyond that excellent and affordable little lens with a focal length range from 12mm through to 24mm in 35mm sensor terms, the latter not one of my preferred focal lengths by any means.

The Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR’s focal range is particularly well-suited to cityscapes and ‘burbscapes, though it can handle documentary shots in a pinch provided you set it at 16mm and watch out for weird volume distortion of people and objects too near the corners of the frame.

Some of that corner volume distortion can be corrected in post-processing with DxO ViewPoint but that can also introduce other distortions in the centre of the photograph.

I would rather have a pro-quality 18mm lens for immersive documentary work, but Fujifilm has yet to update its current quirky 18mm offering or release the coming Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens.

In my analog days I often made architectural photographs with 4”x5” sheet film cameras as part of corporate photography assignments, and as it was a sideline rather than a speciality did not have the set of wide-angle large format view camera lenses I would have liked.

The Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR gives me all of those focal lengths and more.

Shooting architecture with a small handheld camera is a very different dynamic than doing it with a tripod-mounted field camera.

The small camera’s fast and easy mobility means one feels free to dart all around the subject and the zoom lens makes it so fast and easy to try out plenty of alternative camera positions.

I often found myself using the lens at its widest focal length when street furniture, signage and random objects and people got in the way.

So long as you keep a keen eye on potentially detrimental volume and perspective distortions due to distance from and angle of view to the subject, you will do fine.

On the other hand, if you want radical perspective and even more radical near/far object size comparisons, select one of the lens’ wider focal lengths and distort to your heart’s content.

The Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR is possibly the sharpest lens I have ever used, with excellent resolution and micro-contrast.

Whether using Adobe’s Enhance-equipped Camera Raw 11.2, previous versions of Camera Raw or another raw processor or image editing application, its unsharpened raw files are impressive onscreen.

If adding sharpening in post-processing, go easy with it and you may also wish dial down your in-camera sharpening for certain subjects if you are a JPEG user.

The Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR zoom lens makes for a superb addition to your Fujifilm lens collection if your work demands ultra-wide focal lengths, though its current high pricing will give some pause to stop, think and postpone purchase.

Many video-oriented users of Fujifilm APS-C/Super 35 cameras may be better off considering the Fujinon XF 10-24mm f/4.0 R OIS zoom lens for one or more of its most prominent differences – price, size, weight, optical image stabilization and not least the ability to easily mount circular filters of 72mm diameter or larger.

In terms of focal length, one loses 2mm at the wide and gains 8mm at the long end with the 35mm sensor equivalent of 15mm to 36mm, thus providing my preferred documentary photo and video focal lengths of 14mm, 18mm and 23mm or in 35mm sensor terms 21mm, 28mm and 35mm.

Add a medium-to-long zoom lens or some longer primes and you have most bases covered.

The Fujinon XF 10-24mm f/4.0 R OIS zoom lens is reportedly not as sharp or as high-resolving as the Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR and I have read complaints about its lack of corner sharpness at certain wider apertures, so I hope it will be one of the lenses Fujifilm considers for revision in the very near future.

If the Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR meets your needs despite its inability to take a screw-on filter and lack of OIS, and its price is beyond your budget, wait for the discounts and sales seasons or for Fujifilm to substantially drop its price.

If price is no object and if I were a full-time architectural photographer, this would be my number one and possibly only lens for the job.

Gallery, Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR on Fujifilm X-T3

Fujinon XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR at 16mm and 8mm

The XF 8-16mm f/2.8 for architecture with the X-T3’s 3D Electronic Level indicator

fujifilm_x-t3_electronic_level_manual

One of the great X-T3 features rarely if ever covered in the many reviews of the camera is its optional 3D level indicator that can be assigned to a function button.

I have long wished that all Fujifilm cameras had the same always-on 3D level indicator that Panasonic puts in its cameras so that levelling shots involving parallel verticals is made better than guesswork.

Without much if any fanfare Fujifilm has upgraded its electronic level function from just displaying a simple virtual horizon, and if one assigns Electronic Level to a function button then the function becomes even better, a 3D electronic level that displays roll and pitch indicators.

I assigned Electronic Level to the X-T3’s front function button and, when pressed, its 3D form appears onscreen as an overlay for a fixed period so you can quickly tilt your camera in 3D space to avoid what they used to call “keystoning” of buildings.

I found myself using the 3D Electronic Level all the time when photographing architecture and street views, though sometimes I would run my images through DxO ViewPoint after raw processing in order to further refine perspective and volume deformation.

DxO ViewPoint works as standalone software as well as a plug-in in Photoshop and Photoshop-savvy image editing software, as well as a plug-in in DxO PhotoLab which does not, regretfully, support Fujifilm X-Trans raw files.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links below and purchasing through them or our affiliate accounts at B&H Photo Video, SmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

  • FUJIFILM X-H1 Mirrorless Digital Camera Body with Battery Grip KitB&H
  • FUJIFILM VG-XT3 Vertical Battery GripB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-T3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 8-16mm f/2.8 R LM WR LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 14mm f/2.8 R LensB&H

Bounce-Back and Sore Eyes: Why to Choose Black-Bodied Cameras Over Half-Silvered Ones

I have been trying out a Fujifilm X-T3 loaded up with the latest firmware in order to shoot some HLG video footage and further try out the camera’s radically improved autofocus functionality which will reportedly be getting better again in a future firmware update, possibly in April this year. 

The first X-T3 I borrowed was half silver and half black while the current loaner is all black, and what an unexpected and pleasant difference that has made.

I made great use of the silver X-T3 in a two-day documentary photography project and shot quite a bit of footage with its Eterna and F-Log picture profiles, on location in available darkness and the brightest of high UV sunlight.

Each time, halfway through the day I would notice my eyes becoming sore and by day’s end the soreness would be unbearable, especially in my right eye.

_5780135_1024px_80pc
Plenty of reflective silver. Fujifilm X-T3 minimally rigged for video with Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS kit zoom lens, 58-77mm step-up ring, variable ND filter and lens cap for protection in your camera bag when out walking about.

I am ambidextrous and tend towards right eye dominance though that is not exclusive, and with DSLR-style cameras always use my right eye to view through their electronic viewfinders.

I had attributed the unaccustomed soreness to the slowly worsening eyesight of my ageing myopic eyes, and had feared the worst for my eyesight despite recent eye tests showing expected slow, steady but not marked deterioration in vision.

I wondered whether using an EVF camera might be the cause of the soreness given I own two Fujifilm viewfinder cameras, an X100 and an X-Pro2, and use their optical viewfinders in preference to their EVFs.

But then I also have two Panasonic Lumix EVF cameras, one viewfinder-style and the other DSLR-style, and have never experienced problems like this with either of them.

This week, after extensive use of the black X-T3 for shooting video and stills, I am reluctantly coming to the conclusion that the silver X-T3 and its highly reflective silver-coloured magnesium upper body might be the reason for my previous and constant eye soreness.

I have had no eye soreness with the black X-T3 at all.

Of course, this observation about the difference between the two versions of the X-T3 is a deduction and not the result of any form of scientific test, but it is something worth thinking about when I am in a position to invest in my own X-T3 and the coming  Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens.

I had been wondering whether my eye soreness was the product of the EVF in the X-T3, and was worried the problem might rule out investing in an X-T3 or any other DSLR-style Fujifilm camera, but the electronic viewfinder clearly is not the source of that problem.

Postscript

I used the black X-T3 in a wide range of lighting conditions throughout the weekend, in bright high-UV sunlight, deep shade and in poorly-lit train stations and experienced none of the eye soreness that I had when using the silver X-T3.

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  • FUJIFILM X-Pro2 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-T3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR – to be released later in 2019.

Fujifilm Global: Fujifilm releases “FUJINON LENS XF16mmF2.8 R WR”

http://www.fujifilm.com/news/n190214_02.html

“Fujifilm releases “FUJINON LENS XF16mmF2.8 R WR”
– Compact lens with fast AF performance, weighing just 155g, for casual snapshots and landscape photography
– Exceptional image sharpness, dust and weather resistant, and capability of operating at temperatures as low as -10°C
– Wide-angle lens in the Compact Prime series of interchangeable lenses for the X Series

February 14, 2019

FUJIFILM Corporation (President: Kenji Sukeno) has announced that a compact and lightweight wide angle lens, “FUJINON LENS XF16mmF2.8 R WR” (XF16mmF2.8 R WR), will join the lineup of interchangeable lenses for the X Series of digital cameras, renowned for their outstanding image quality based on the company’s proprietary color reproduction technology. The new lens has the maximum aperture value of F2.8 and focal length of 16mm (equivalent to 24mm in the 35mm film format), delivering edge-to-edge sharpness. Stylishly designed and weighing just 155g, the lens boasts high-speed AF performance, making it ideal for casual snapshots and landscape photography. The XF16mmF2.8 R WR’s black color will be released in late March 2019, and its silver color is due to be released in May 2019.

The XF16mmF2.8 R WR is a wide angle lens that consists of 10 lens elements in 8 groups, including two aspherical lens elements, to effectively control field curvature and spherical aberration for an advanced level of image sharpness across the frame. It is capable of drawing out the full performance of Fujifilm’s proprietary X-Trans™ CMOS sensor*. Its inner-focus AF system** uses a stepping motor*** to drive the focusing group of lens elements for silent and fast autofocus. Furthermore, the compact lens weighs just 155g. This means the total weight of a camera system comes to only 538g when this lens is mounted on the FUJIFILM X-T30 mirrorless digital camera (X-T30), also announced today, promising exceptional portability.

Metal parts are used extensively on the exterior to achieve a stylish look that gives a sense of premium quality and robustness. The aperture ring and focus ring have been designed for optimum operability and user comfort. The lens is also dust and weather resistant, and operates at temperatures as low as -10°C, accommodating a wide variety of shooting conditions.

Fujifilm has been promoting compact and lightweight fixed-focal-length lenses as the “Compact Prime” series, which include stylish models such as the “FUJINON LENS XF23mmF2 R WR” (XF23mmF2 R WR), “FUJINON LENS XF35mmF2 R WR” (XF35mmF2 R WR) and “FUJINON LENS XF50mmF2 R WR” (XF50mmF2 R WR). The series allow users to enjoy snapshots casually, thereby further expanding the appeal of the X Series.

X-Trans is a trademark or registered trademark of FUJIFILM Corporation. With a highly-aperiodic proprietary color filter array, the sensor minimizes moiré effects and false colors without the use of an optical low-pass filter.

**An AF system that moves relatively small lens elements in the middle or at the rear for focusing without moving the front group, which consist of relatively large lens elements
***A type of motor that rotates only at a fixed angle in response to an electrical pulse signal, making it capable of precision positioning.

1. Product features

(1) Advanced image resolution

The lens consists of 10 elements in 8 groups, including two aspherical lens elements. The aspherical lens elements are controlled at high precision to reduce field curvature and spherical aberration, resulting in an advanced level of image sharpness across the frame and drawing out the full performance of Fujifilm’s proprietary X-Trans™ CMOS sensor. The lens is also capable of close-ups with the minimum working distance of just 17cm.

(2) Compact, lightweight and stylish design for superior operability

The compact lens weighs just 155g, keeping the total weight of a camera to only 538g when it is mounted on the X-T30 mirrorless digital camera for excellent portability. It also measures only 45.4mm long.

The extensive use of metal parts on the exterior achieves a stylish look that gives a sense of premium quality and robustness, similar to the XF23mmF2 R WR, XF35mmF2 R WR and XF50mmF2 R WR.

The aperture ring and focus ring have just the right amount of clicking and torque for ease of use.

(3) Fast and silent autofocus

The lens uses the inner-focus AF system that drives smaller and lighter focusing elements. It uses a stepping motor, known for its silent operation and precise control, to achieve fast and silent autofocus.

(4) Advanced weather resistance will withstand a wide variety of shooting conditions

The lens barrel, sealed at 9 locations makes the lens dust and weather resistant and capable of operating at temperatures as low as -10°C.

Mounting it on weather-sealed mirrorless digital cameras such as X-Pro2, X-T2, X-T3 and X-H1 allows you to shoot in light rain or a dusty environment outdoors with peace of mind.

<Optional accessories>

“PRF-49” protection filter and “FLCP-49” front lens cap

Together with the launch of the XF16mmF2.8 R WR, Fujifilm is releasing the PRF-49 protection filter and the FLCP-49 front lens cap compatible with Φ49mm filter diameter….”

fujinon_xf16mmf2.8_r_wr_01_1024px
Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR prime lens, with lens hood.

Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR

Commentary

I first came across the news that Fujifilm would be adding a 16mm prime lens to its “Fujicron” fast, small prime lens range at Fuji Rumors, and was a little dismayed.

Was Fujifilm pulling a fast one by releasing this lens instead of the updated 18mm that documentary photographers and photojournalists had been requesting for ages now, and that had been reported as “in the works”?

Since putting Fujifilm’s current 18mm prime lens to a thorough test with documentary and street photography subjects, I have been hoping beyond hope that Fujifilm will at least produce a “Fujicron” 18mm lens if not a manual clutch focusing 18mm lens in the same style as its excellent, professional-quality XF 14mm f/2.8 R, XF 16mm f/1.4 R and XF 23mm f/1.4 R prime lenses.

Fujifilm’s “Fujicron” compact prime lens collection was so named by Fujifilm customers rather than the company itself for their loose resemblance to Leica’s M-System M-Lenses for the company’s M rangefinder cameras.

My documentary photography and photojournalism style and methods were the product of relying for many years on Leica rangefinder cameras and a set of Leica Summicron-M and Elmarit-M lenses, and the rangefinder way of seeing and shooting is the one with which I remain most comfortable, working fast and efficient in available light and darkness.

leica_summilux+_lineup_21-90mm_square_1920px_80pc
Leica worked out the best prime lens focal length line-up for documentary photography and photojournalism in 35mm years ago and it remains the benchmark and role model for other lens makers to this very day. The only focal length missing from this lens collection is 40mm, which Leica made for the Leica CL rangefinder camera which was later taken over by Minolta as the Minolta CLE with 40mm standard lens as well as a 28mm and 90mm lens. Too many contemporary lens makers leave out 28mm and 75mm lenses and their equivalents for other sensor formats. Why? Both these focal lengths are the most essential for documentary photography and photojournalism.

My preferred documentary photography and video prime lens focal lengths in APS-C and their 35mm equivalents are:

  • 14mm – equal to 21mm
  • 18mm – equal to 28mm
  • 23mm – equal to 35mm
  • 27mm – equal to 40mm
  • 50mm – equal to 75mm

My practice when covering events is to carry two prime lenses mounted on two camera bodies, with my preferred focal length combination being 18mm and 50mm – in 35mm sensor terms, 28mm and 75mm.

I don’t have either of those prime lens focal lengths for my Fujifilm cameras and my current set of three Fujinon lenses predate the “Fujicron” compact prime concept, so I rely on a suboptimal set of otherwise terrific prime lenses instead.

Their 23mm, 27mm and 56mm focal lengths are not a perfect fit for my long-standing documentary photography methods so I usually default to just the 23mm lens, or bring a Panasonic Micro Four Thirds camera with me, equipped with a Panasonic compact or Olympus pro-quality zoom lens, in order to add the equivalent of 18mm and 75mm to my kit.

Fujifilm’s compact primes are particularly well-suited to its X-Pro2 digital rangefinder camera as well as its small DSLR-style and rangefinder-style cameras.

The X-Pro2’s optical viewfinder aka OVF is designed for focal lengths from 18mm through to 56mm, and benefits from short lenses with narrow front diameters to avoid jutting too much into the OVF’s field of view.

Wider and longer lenses can be used with the X-Pro2’s electronic viewfinder aka EVF though it is not up to the standard set by, say, the X-T3’s EVF.

My preferred event documentary prime lens pair of 18mm and 50mm is based on the distances I can easily maintain from my subjects in a crowd while depicting enough information in order to tell the story.

I am currently editing images shot in a dense crowd in poor light with my 23mm and 56mm lenses on an X-T3, and am constantly wishing I had a pair of 18mm and 50mm fast-focussing, wide maximum aperture, prime lenses instead.

I have tried out the Fujinon XF 50mm f/2.0 R WR and have been impressed with its image quality and autofocusing speed.

Now we need Fujifilm to come to the party with, say, a Fujinon XF 18mm f/1.4 manual clutch focusing lens optimized for pro video and stills photography, or at the very least a Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0 (or f/2.8) R WR “Fujicron” compact prime.

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  • FUJIFILM X-Pro2 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 14mm f/2.8 R Lens – B&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 16mm f/1.4 R WR Lens – B&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 18mm f/2 R LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 23mm f/2 R WR LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 35mm f/2 R WR LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 50mm f/2 R WR LensB&H

Fujifilm Global: Fujifilm releases new mirrorless digital camera “FUJIFILM X-T30 ”

http://www.fujifilm.com/news/n190214_01.html

“Fujifilm releases new mirrorless digital camera “FUJIFILM X-T30 ”

– Equipped with new image sensor and image processing engine into a compact and lightweight body for the ultimate image quality
– Highly-accurate AF performance across the frame and fast / silent continuous shooting of up to 30fps* to capture every decisive moment
– Fine and smooth 4K video with high-resolution audio, meeting the needs of full-scale video production

February 14, 2019

FUJIFILM Corporation (President: Kenji Sukeno) is delighted to announce the launch of the FUJIFILM X-T30 mirrorless digital camera (X-T30) in late March 2019, the latest model to join the X Series, known for superior image quality delivered with the company’s proprietary color reproduction technology.

In its compact body that weighs just 383g, the X-T30 features the 26.1MP X-Trans™ CMOS 4 sensor** and the fast X-Processor 4 image processing engine to achieve the ultimate image quality. Furthermore, it offers highly accurate AF performance across the entire frame and silent continuous shooting capability of up to an impressive 30 fps*, ensuring that you would never miss a decisive photo opportunity in a variety of situations. The camera can also record 4K/30P*** video while applying “Film Simulation mode”, including the “ETERNA” with rich color grading, based on Fujifilm’s proprietary color reproduction technology. Its ability to record fine and smooth 4K video with high-resolution audio will meet the needs of those involved in full-scale video production.

The X-T30 inherits popular exterior design features of the current model, FUJIFILM X-T20 (X-T20), while providing excellent operability with a new grip design that enhances stable grip when holding the camera, a touchscreen panel display with improved response performance, and the “Focus Lever” that facilitates faster focusing operation. The camera is also equipped with the “Auto Mode Selector Lever” that allows you to instantaneously switch to a fully-automatic shooting mode, making it a perfect mirrorless digital camera for a broad range of users who want to enjoy premium-quality pictures.

*Only available when using the electronic shutter. The camera offers fast and silent continuous shooting of up to 30fps in a cropped frame equivalent to 16.6MP.

**X-Trans™ is a trademark or registered trademark of FUJIFILM Corporation. With the use of a proprietary highly aperiodic color filter array, the sensor minimizes moiré effects and false colors without the use of an optical low-pass filter.

***Capable of recording smooth 4K video at 30fps

1. Compact camera body that weighs just 383g and is equipped with the X Trans™ CMOS 4 sensor and high-speed X Processor 4 image processing engine to deliver ultimate image quality and versatile photographic expressions.

The X-T30’s compact camera body that weighs just 383g features the X-Trans™ CMOS 4 sensor (APS-C, no low pass filter) and high-speed X-Processor 4 image processing engine. Together, they deliver the class-leading 26.1MP resolution for digital cameras with an APS-C-size sensor, and achieve excellent noise-reduction performance. Furthermore, the sensitivity of ISO160, previously*4 available only as extended ISO, is now part of the normal ISO range. This is particularly useful when shooting in bright daylight outdoors or trying to achieve beautiful bokeh with a fast large-aperture lens.

The “Film Simulation mode”, which provides versatile color expressions with Fujifilm’s proprietary technology, now has the new “ETERNA mode”. This camera also offers “monochrome adjustments” for Film Simulation’s “ACROS” and “Monochrome” modes to achieve warm black and cool black.

The “Color Chrome Effect” produces deeper colors and gradation to broaden diversity in your photographic expressions.

*4 When compared to the X-Trans™ CMOS III sensor

2. Highly accurate AF performance across the entire frame and fast / silent continuous shooting capability of up to 30fps to capture a decisive moment in a wide range of situations

The X-Trans™ CMOS 4 sensor has 2.16 million phase detection pixels, about 4 times that of previous models*4, to expand the highly-accurate phase detection AF area to the entire frame (approximately 100%). When using the electronic shutter, the camera can deliver fast and silent continuous shooting of up to 30fps in a cropped frame equivalent to 16.6MP (1.25x crop). This means even a fast-moving subject, positioned away from the center of the frame, can be autofocused at an amazing speed and accuracy, ensuring that you will not miss a decisive shutter moment.

The X-Processor 4’s high processing speed and improved AF algorithm has boosted the camera’s capability to accurately detect human faces and eyes. The “Face Select function” has been also introduced to provide priority auto-focus on the face of a selected subject when multiple faces have been detected within a frame. The low-light limit for phase detection AF has been extended from +0.5EV on previous models*5 to -3EV, making on-screen phase detection AF available in very poor lighting such as at night or under a light source of limited luminosity, such as candlelight.

Evolved functionality of the “Advanced SR Auto mode” can be activated instantaneously with the use of the “Auto Mode Selector lever”, positioned on the camera body’s top panel. The camera automatically chooses the optimum shooting settings for a given scene out of 58 presets so that you can achieve the best image quality without having to worry about settings yourself.

*5 When compared to the X-T20

3. Newly-redesigned grip shape and the inclusion of the “Focus Lever” for outstanding operability

The X-T30 inherits popular exterior design features of the X-T20, while adopting a new grip design that makes the camera body sit comfortably in your hand. It also has the “Focus Lever”, replacing the “Selector Button”, to afford extra grip space at the rear. These design enhancements have created added hand-holding stability despite the camera’s compact and lightweight body, even when it is mounted with a large lens such as a telephoto zoom.

The rear LCD monitor uses a touchscreen panel display 1.3mm thinner than that on the X-T20. Its improved touchscreen response enables faster and more intuitive camera operations.

The X-T30 is available in the popular Black version the Silver version for a premium look with greater sheen, and the Charcoal Silver version*6, all representing a sense of high quality and robustness.

*6 Will be in store later than the Black and Silver version

4. Extensive video functions that meet the needs of full-scale video production

The X-T30’s new video features include the capability to record with high-resolution audio and track human eyes even during video recording. Smooth 4K/30P video can be recorded at 8bit 4:2:0 on an SD card, and also output to external storage media via the HDMI port at 10bit 4:2:2 to include more color information. The camera is also capable of F-log recording, which captures footage in wider gamut for later editing of color tones and luminosity. These extensive video functions cater to the needs of full-scale video production.

Video data, greater than what is required for 6K video, is scaled down to 4K to achieve advanced sharpness with minimal moiré. The camera supports recording in the DCI format (17:9 aspect ratio), used in digital cinemas, for dynamic video footage in high resolution.

The X-T30 can apply “Film Simulation mode”, popular for stills, while recording video, so that you can enjoy a diverse range of unique effects, including the “ETERNA” for rich color grading….”

fujifilm_x-t30_01_1920px
Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujinon XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR “Fujicron” prime lens. Photograph by Jonas Rask for Fujifilm.

Fujifilm X-T30

Commentary

fujinon_xf16mmf2.8_r_wr_04_1024px
Fujifilm’s “Fujicron” fast, compact prime lens collection as of February 2019 comprising the Fujinon XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR, Fujinon XF 23mm f/2.0 R WR, Fujinon XF 35mm f/2.0 R WR and Fujinon XF 50mm f/2.0 R WR lenses. These lenses are particularly suited to Fujifilm’s smaller cameras, while the Fujinon XF 27mm f.2.8 prime and Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/.28-4.0 R LM OIS are also well worth considering for use on the X-T30 and its compact siblings as well as larger Fujifilm cameras.

Fujifilm’s X-T30 DSLR-style APS-C premium compact hybrid camera has an impressive list of specifications   that position it just below the amazing X-T3 and make it a more than suitable companion, backup or replacement camera depending on the demands of your project.

I have yet to try it or its predecessor the Fujifilm X-T20 out yet so cannot speak to the pros and cons of its smaller size compared to its larger siblings, but based on my experience of the X-T3 assume that the X-T30 may be better suited to Fujifilm’s smaller lenses at right than the company’s larger, heavier optics.

I also suggest looking out for hand grips and L-plates to fit the X-T30 in order to give it a little more heft when mounting larger lenses.

Fujifilm’s product page indicates that its Hand Grip MHG-XT10 metal hand grip will fit and as I use the company’s hand grips on several Fujifilm cameras can strongly recommend them.

Fujifilm is portraying the X-T30 as “The Little Giant” and from its specifications list alone it clearly lives up to that nickname.

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  • FUJIFILM Metal Hand Grip for X-T10, X-T20, and X-T30B&H
  • FUJIFILM X-E3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-T20 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-T30 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • Fujifilm XF Fujinon lensesB&H

Fujifilm Global: Fujifilm announces firmware updates for the FUJIFILM X-T3

http://www.fujifilm.com/news/n190214_04.html

“… FUJIFILM Corporation (President: Kenji Sukeno) will release new firmware updates for the FUJIFILM X-T3 (“X-T3”) X Series digital camera in April.

Firmware Version:
[ FUJIFILM X-T3 Ver. 3.00: April 2019 ]

1.Strengthened the accuracy of face / eye detection AF performance

The AF algorithm has been improved along with the accuracy of face / eye detection AF. The ability to detect faces in the distance has been enhanced by approximately 30% and AF tracking is now more stable, even when an obstacle appears in the way. The improvements in AF are applicable to both still photos and video recording.

2.New Face Select function

The Face Select function has been introduced to provide priority auto-focus, tracking and exposure on a selected subject when multiple faces have been detected. The priority face can be selected by using the touch screen or focus lever.

3.Faster AF speed for subjects at a distance

Thanks to the improved AF algorithm, faster AF speed is achieved when shooting from short to long distances (or vice versa).

4.Intuitive operation of touch screen

A Double Tap Setting and Touch Function has been added to the touch screen settings*. The two settings must be set to OFF to provide a better touch screen response. These new settings allow a more intuitive touch operation when shooting, AF and focus area select.

*By default, Touch Screen Setting, Double Tap Setting and Touch Function are set to all OFF.
For improved touch screen response, Touch Screen Setting must be set to ON.”

fujifilm_x-t3_15_1024px_80pc
Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujifilm VG-XT3 Vertical Battery Grip and Fujinon MKX 18-55mm T2.9 cinema zoom lens.

Commentary

Autofocus is a feature I had assumed would be nice to have rather than crucial when I first got back  into moviemaking and photography with hybrid digital cameras.

As time passed, and as autofocus steadily improved on the gear I was using through firmware updates and new camera models, I have come to see the utility value of autofocusing for stills photography and now, with the X-T3 having the best autofocus functionality for video yet of all the mirrorless cameras I have tried, it looks like it will be getting better again with April’s coming firmware update.

Improved face and eye detection is particularly welcome given I am in the process of getting back into portrait photography and manual focus with longer lenses and moving subjects does not always cut the mustard, as it were.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

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Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art zoom lens for APS-C sensors and for adapting to M43 with Metabones SpeedBoosters, lens available in Canon EF or Nikon mounts.

Clicking on the links below and purchasing through them or our affiliate accounts at B&H Photo Video, SmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

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