Reviews of Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR Zoom Lens Are Mixed, Possible Problems When Shooting Video

The Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR wide-to-long zoom lens has been one of the most long wished-for, long-awaited optics for Fujifilm’s APS-C/Super35 system cameras in recent years, and early reports from Fujifilm X-Photographer have been positive, especially regarding its apparent parfocal lens design. 

But then one might well expect brand ambassadors to wax lyrical and skip over possible pre-production and early firmware defects given reasonable expectations that Fujifilm will get it right in the end or at least in time for offical product release date. 

Not quite this time, apparently, as Fujifilm recently issued firmware version 1.02 for this now-shipping lens and some reviewers are already hoping that further firmware updates are in the pipeline. 

fujinon_xf_16-80mm_f4.0_r_wr_ois_06_1024px.jpg
Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens.
_DSF2954_cameraraw_1920px
Fujifilm X-Pro3 pre-production model in Dura Black with pre-production Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens, as seen at a Ted’s World of Imaging Touch-and-Try event in Sydney.

I was lucky enough to have a short time with a preproduction version of the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom at a recent Ted’s World of Imaging touch-and-try event for the Fujifilm X-Pro3, and found it worked well enough when shooting event stills on a Fujifilm X-H1 unequipped with firmware updates for the lens.

The lens is situated price-wise in-between the pro-quality, pro-priced red badge Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR and the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS kit zoom, and there was some speculation that the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR might be bundled with later-release Fujifilm X-T3s or the coming X-T4 as a higher-specced kit lens, especially for video production.

The 16-80mm’s parfocal focusing is especially attractive for video use as well as the lens’ apparent 6 stops of optical image stabilization that helps make up for its f/4.0 maximum aperture when handholding in low lighting when used on non-stabilized cameras like the X-T3, X-Pro3 and the coming X-T4.

Questions about the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR’s optical qualities throughout its focal range were bandied about during the long pre-release period and I have yet to find a complete set of in-depth tests of the lens’ image quality and focusing performance.

In the meantime, pal2tech’s initial and subsequent video reviews have rather dampened my enthusiasm for the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR.

Are what he is seeing in action when shooting video in particular early production model teething problems, uneven quality assurance, limitations in current firmware or the outcome of too many design and engineering compromises?

Zoom lenses are a set of such compromises compared to prime lenses and a certain amount of them are to be expected, especially in a lens with a longer-than-usual focal length range, but has Fujifilm compromised way too much?

pal2tech’s videos may help you make up your own mind, but I would recommend going off in search of more reviews by video professionals before definitively deciding against the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR.

While some optical and autofocusing problems can be compensated for via firmware and during processing of raw stills images, video is more demanding of lens quality given that shortfalls in optical quality cannot be corrected in video non-linear editing software.

My experiences with Micro Four Thirds cameras and lenses, as well as Fujifilm’s APS-C/Super 35 gear, have amply proven the advantages of having a stabilized zoom lens in one’s kit when shooting documentary stills and video in trying conditions and available darkness rather than available light, so the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR would, theoretically, fill a yawning gap in my Fujinon lens collection.

Provided that it is as good for video as it seemed to be for stills during my all-too-short time with the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR at Ted’s.

Like many others, I have had high expectations for this lens given my longtime need for a gap-filling zoom lens for video and photography, and given the poor Australian dollar and consequent high price in local online and bricks-and-mortar stores.

Should I be reconsidering the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS kit zoom lens instead, and go off to ebay to look for the latter secondhand?

pal2tech: Fuji 16-80 Lens Review

pal2tech: Fujifilm 16-80mm Lens Firmware Update 1.01

pal2tech: Fujifilm 16-80 Lens Focus Problem Fix — Possible Solution

pal2tech: Fujifilm 16-80 Lens Firmware Update 1.02 – Can’t Test (and my thoughts)

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • FUJIFILM X-H1 Mirrorless Digital Camera Body with Battery Grip KitB&H – bundled with the unstabilized Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR, this stabilized camera may still be the current best option for video despite its older generation sensor and processor.
  • FUJIFILM X-Pro3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-T3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR Lens B&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS LensB&H

Three Blind Men and An Elephant Productions: FujiFilm X-Pro3: Dangerous!

“A modest dissertation on the X-Pro3 development announcement, clickbait and the diminution of language.”

fujifiom_x-pro3_preproduction_01_1080px
Image of pre-production Fujifilm X-Pro3 from video of Fujifilm X Summit Shibuya 2019 on September 20, 2019.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • Fujifilm Cameras B&H
  • Fujifilm LensesB&H

bigheadtaco: First Look: Fujifilm XF16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR

“It’s been a while since Fujifilm released a wide to medium range zoom lens, especially with both OIS and WR. Previously, the only general range zoom lens that had both features was the big and bulky XF18-135mm lens. My hope was that Fujifilm would re-make the XF18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS lens to be XF16-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS WR. Instead, Fujifilm decided to keep the original kit lens and create the new XF 16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR. Who is this lens for? It really depends. If you own the X-T3 and you really want a mid-range zoom lens with both OIS and WR, this is the only option you have. However, if you own the X-H1, would you be better off with the XF 16-55mm f/2.8 and put up with the size and weight of a professional lens? “

fujinon_xf_16-80mm_f4.0_r_wr_ois_06_1024px.jpg
Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens.

Commentary

Good to see that photographers are receiving pre-production copies of Fujifilm’s Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR and, as usual, even more reviews will be appearing when production versions of the lens make their way into the world.

When I was photographing the climate strike rally in Sydney on September 20, I found myself wondering how the 16-80mm f/4.0 zoom lens might change and even improve the way I cover such subjects.

See my personal Instagram account for documentary photographs of the rally and other events, recently mostly using prime lenses on Fujifilm cameras as Panasonic Lumix camera and lens loaners have been in short supply.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • Fujifilm Cameras B&H
  • Fujifilm LensesB&H

Fujifilm X Summit Shibuya 2019 and the Fujinon XF 33mm f/1.0 Super Fast Prime Lens

First topic to be tackled at Fujifilm’s X Summit Shibuya 2019 on September 20 was lenses and specifically the Fujinon XF 33mm f/1.0 superfast standard prime lens so often requested by Fujifilm aficionados in online polls such as those run by Patrick Di Vino of Fuji Rumors. 

Before tackling that lens, though, the soon-to-be-released Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR standard zoom lens was displayed onstage and its size and apparent weight hinted at it soon being a very in-demand lens and a viable alternative to Fujifilm’s three other standard zoom lenses, the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS kit lens, the Fujinon XF 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR travel lens and the Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR Red Badge premium-quality lens. 

The surprise of the lens segment, though, was the 33mm f/1.0 being shelved in favour of a Fujinon XF 50mm f/1.0 prime lens due to size and weight problems Fujifilm encountered in the design process. 

leica_summilux+_lineup_21-90mm_square_1920px_80pc
Leica worked out the best prime lens focal length line-up for documentary photography and photojournalism in 35mm years ago and it remains the benchmark and role model for other lens makers to this very day. The only focal length missing from this lens collection is 40mm, which Leica made for the Leica CL rangefinder camera which was later taken over by Minolta as the Minolta CLE with 40mm standard lens as well as a 28mm and 90mm lens. Too many contemporary lens makers leave out 28mm and 75mm lenses and their equivalents for other sensor formats. Why? Both these focal lengths are the most essential for documentary photography and photojournalism.

I was not cut up about Fujifilm swapping the 50mm f/1.0 for the 33mm f/1.0 given I have never been a fan of 50mm and thereabouts standard lenses and their 33mm to 35mm equivalents in APS-C/Super 35 sensor cameras.

I much prefer 40mm equivalent “perfect normal” standard lenses due to their versatility and and proximity to the effects of human vision, finding 50mm lenses a little too much like short telephotos.

I often carry an X-Pro2 with Fujinon XF 27mm f/2.8 “pancake” lens attached and love this focal length as much for use in video as stills photography, for portraiture and interviews as much for multiple figure documentary work.

I even rely on my 27mm f/2.8 lens for handheld product shots, though in other camera systems and sensor sizes I tend more towards 50mm equivalents due to these lenses often being given away with the camera or at least at give-away prices.

I would love it if Fujifilm produced a weather-resistant aperture ring-equipped 27mm lens with manual clutch focus in line with the company’s commitment to pro-quality video production, to sit alongside the similarly-designed XF 14mm f/2.8 R, XF 16mm f/1.4 R WR and XF 23mm f/1.4 R lenses.

While Fujifilm’s X-mount Fujinon MKX 18-55mm T2.9 and MKX 50-135mm T2.9 parfocal cinema zoom lens pair appears to be an excellent solution for video production, we also need prime lenses more suitable for cinematography and stills photography on Fujifilm’s hybrid cameras.

Fujifilm’s surprise XF 50mm f/1.0 would make a suitable 75mm equivalent lens for stills and video as would a revamped XF 35mm f/1.4 R so long as both are also equipped with manual clutch focus.

nikon_micro-nikkor_105mmf2.8_01_1024px_60pc
Nikon Micro-Nikkor 105mm f/2.8 manual focus, manual exposure macro lens, the lens with which I became a portrait photographer.

If Fujifilm’s lens designers can retain the optical qualities of the current 35mm f/1.4 lens, often referred to as the “god lens”, but encased inside a fast autofocusing, weather resistant, manual clutch focus housing then we would have a decent set of matched primes  for Fujifilm’s X-Tn and X-Hn series cameras as a viable alternative to the MKX zooms.

Even better would be if Fujifilm produced a fast maximum aperture 70mm prime lens, equivalent to 105mm in the 35mm sensor format.

Although portrait photography benefits from access to a range of standard or normal to longer focal lengths, from 40mm through 50mm, 75mm and 105mm to even longer ones contained within the Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS Red Badge zoom lens, my personal preference for most portrait work is 105mm given I started in portraiture with Nikon’s Micro-Nikkor 105mm f/2.8 in my art school days and still yearn for a Fujinon APS-C equivalent.

A wider maximum aperture than f/2.8 would be even better, something closer to Sigma’s 105mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art lens than its 105mm f/2.8 Macro lens.

I might add that the 18mm focal length in APS-C and Super 35, equivalent to 28mm in the 35mm sensor format, is my number one preference for documentary cinematography and stills photography, and the lack of a professional quality 18mm prime lens in Fujifilm’s X-mount system is a constant thorn in my side.

If such a lens existed it would take up permanence residence on my prime documentary camera with a, preferably, fast 75mm or even a 105mm equivalent lens on my second cameras in a two-camera, two-lens documentary set-up.

Think Nick Nolte’s photojournalist in Under Fire or David Douglas Duncan with a long lens on an SLR and a wide lens on a Leica M-Series rangefinder camera.

Imagine a matched set of top-quality lenses for stills and video to choose from consisting of 14mm, 16mm, 18mm, 23mm, 27mm, 35mm, 50mm, 56mm and 70mm, all with weather resistance, manual clutch focus, fast autofocus and aperture rings.

No more hoping that third party lens makers might somehow see fit to come up with a full set of matched manual focusing optics so that Fujifilm’s Super 35-shooting X-mount cameras might have the video prime lenses they so richly deserve.

Documentary photographs using a two-camera, two prime lens set-up

Prime lens alternatives to the Fujinon XF 50mm f/1.0

My first two lenses for the X-Pro2 were the Fujinon XF 23mm f/1.4 R and Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R, and my choice was based on the available light documentary-style wedding photography practices of Kevin Mullins as generously shared on his website f16.click.

My budget was limited so other lenses on my list for consideration then, the Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0 and Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 R OIS kit zoom, had to be excluded.

Over the years I have found the XF 56mm f/1.2 R to be an excellent portrait lens with the aperture set at or near f/1.2.

The 56mm’s downsides are the slowness of its focusing motors, its lack of manual clutch focus, that its closest focusing distance is not close enough for my full face portrait style, and its 84mm focal length equivalence means I often must step back too much when framing groups of people in crowds for images like the ones above.

Kevin Mullins’ style is not mine and it has been a long time since I photographed weddings to put myself through university art school.

Mr Mullins appears to mostly photograph weddings with wide open aperture, in program mode, and in search of a blurry, gritty, grainy, funky look whereas my ways of seeing and photographing derive from the deep focus and laser beam sunlight-lit places in which I grew up.

I have tried the Fujinon XF 50mm f/2.0 R WR out for urban documentary and it performed well, alone and in combination with the Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0 and that pairing has worked in a similar way to when I relied on Leica M-Series rangefinder cameras with 28mm and 75mm Leica lenses.

The Fujinon XF 50mm f/2.0 R WR in combo with the Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0

If only Fujifilm would at least update its 18mm f/2.0 to match the optical and mechanical quality of its 50mm f/2.0, or even better come up with an f/1.4 18mm manual clutch focus alternative for video production and stills photography.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • Fujifilm Cameras B&H
  • Fujifilm LensesB&H

Fuji Rumors: Some LOVE the Fujifilm X-Pro3, and Here is Why!

https://www.fujirumors.com/some-love-the-fujifilm-x-pro3-and-here-is-why/

“Today I thought I try to balance out the X-Pro3 sh*tstorm, by sharing a few stories of people, who actually either like or understand (and hence accept) the new X-Pro3 hidden tilt screen concept.

If you ask me personally, I admit that my first reaction was also something like “what the heck is this?”

But you know what I have learned from reading the massive (and brilliant) essays of Michel de Montaigne?

I have learned that we should try to “suspend our judgment”….”

live-from-tokyo-x-summit-shibuya-2019--fujifilm-01185515_gigapixel
The tilting LCD monitor on the Fujifilm X-Pro3 digital rangefinder camera. Still frame from live streaming video of Fujifilm X-Pro3 from Fujifilm X Summit on 20th September 2019.

Commentary

fujifilm_tx-1_35mm_panorama_camera_01_1024px_60pc
Fujifilm TX-1 35mm panorama camera. Image courtesy of Japan Camera Hunter. Fujifilm has been producing cutting-edge rangefinder cameras for decades.

Suspension of judgement is exactly what is needed in this moment between Fujifilm revealing the X-Pro3 at its recent X Summit Shibuya 2019 and the first appearance of production versions of the camera in the specialist media and retailers.

Fujifilm is clearly going through a process of differentiation and granulation with its current and coming camera offerings, pushing the X-Pro series even further into rangefinder photography camera territory.

When the X-Pro1 was released, there was no X-Tn series and certainly no X-Hn series, and no mention at all of any possible GFX medium format cameras.

All our hopes were in the one basket but now there are non-rangefinder-style alternatives like the X-T3, X-T30 and soon, hopefully, the X-H2 to realize all the promise revealed in the X-H1 that was thwarted somewhat by its X-T2 generation sensor and processor.

I still love shooting 4K video with my X-Pro2 when needed and when it is the only camera I am carrying at the time, which is almost every day, and was saddened by the limited video functionality Fujifilm gave us in the relevant firmware update, but heavy video production requires the use of cameras with heavyweight video firmware functionality.

Right now, the Fujifilm X-T3 makes an excellent Super 35 video camera for use with gimbals and other forms of traditional stabilization via hardware, and OIS-equipped zoom lenses are also a good solution when shooting handheld video.

The coming Fujifilm X-H2 needs to take a leaf from Panasonic’s book, learning the lessons of the Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5, the GH5S and the S1H and then surpassing them with all the hardware features and firmware functionality required for handheld or heavily-rigged video production.

I am looking forward to learning more about the X-Pro3’s improved optical viewfinder and especially its improved electronic viewfinder, the latter one of the weakest aspects of the X-Pro2 despite its other many strengths as a documentary camera.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • Fujifilm Cameras B&H
  • Fujifilm LensesB&H

TheSnapChick: IBIS, Dynamic Range and a Clever Coyote! Fujifilm X-H1 is an X Series Gem

“I ran around with the Fujifilm X-H1 for three weeks. I loved it. More detailed thoughts and photos/videos in the review!…

My channel is about photography as an art form and as a lifestyle, with a healthy dose of technology thrown in!”

fujifilm_x-h1_50-140mm_01_1024px_60%
Fujifilm X-H1 with Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR professional zoom lens.

Commentary

Longtime Canon and Nikon DSLR user Brittany Leigh has published a series of video reviews of Fujifilm’s X-Mount APS-C/Super 35 mirrorless cameras and I hope she will review more Fujifilm cameras and Fujinon lenses including the company’s new three medium format G-Mount cameras.

Female reviewers of photography and cinematography gear are far too rare, and female reviewers working in documentary photography, photojournalism or documentary moviemaking are even more rare.

Ms Leigh appears to photograph mostly landscape and wildlife, neither of which are genres I practice, but her technical and usability insight is excellent especially given her DSLR and SLR background, very useful for those from the same background contemplating modernizing by joining the mirrorless revolution.

I have just discovered Brittany Leigh via her TheSnapChick Youtube channel, and so far her analyses of the Fujifilm X100F, X-H1, X-T3 and, I assume, the X-T30, are spot on.

I have yet to experience the X-T30 but given how remarkable its larger sibling the X-T3 has proven to be, the former is doubtless just as remarkable in its own way.

Fujifilm is rather unique in the way it produces cameras with not dissimilar internals to fill a range of usability niches, suiting a wide range of users across all genres.

Fujifilm is not a one-size-fits-all camera and lens maker, and I hope that the granularity of its current offerings becomes even more apparent in future cameras and lenses.

Using the X100 series is a pure photography rangefinder-style experience with all the benefits of a fixed lens in one of the most useful focal length equivalents, a Fujinon 23mm f/2.0 prime at the equivalent of 35mm in the 35mm sensor format.

I do not use the misleading “full frame”, “full format” and “crop sensor” terminology, product of the marketing department rather than designers and engineers, by the way.

The X-T3, and one assumes the X-T30, is a brilliant state of the art Super 35 video camera as well as an APS-C stills camera capable of producing image quality rivalling 35mm sensor-equipped cameras.

The X-H1, which I have been trying out thanks to the kindness of Fujifilm Australia and its PR agency, is a harbinger of pro-level things to come and had I the spare change for one of the current amazing deals comprising camera, vertical battery grip, lens and accessories, then I would snap one up immediately to fill the gaps between the X-Pro2 and the X-T3.

There being no one-size-fits-all camera in the Fujifilm X and GFX systems, each camera needs to be considered for its strengths and weaknesses.

When working professionally, one needs to carry a range of cameras and lenses, often with some degree of overlap should the worst occur on location, and the size, weight and relative affordability of Fujifilm’s APS-C/Super 35 X-Mount cameras and lenses makes it possible to transport it all in a backpack or hard case.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • Fujifilm Cameras B&H
  • Fujifilm LensesB&H

DPReview: CP+ 2019: Fujifilm interview – ‘We want to show photographers the future’

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/8410636142/cp-2019-fujifilm-interview-we-want-to-show-photographers-the-future

“At the CP+ show earlier this month in Yokohama Japan, we sat down with senior executives from Fujifilm. During our conversation we covered everything from the upcoming GFX 100, to plans for APS-C and why the X100 still occupies such an important position in the company’s lineup.

Our interview was conducted with three senior executives in Fujifilm’s Electronic Imaging Products Division:

  • Toshi Iida, General Manager.
  • Makoto Oishi, Product Planning Manager.
  • Shin Udono, Senior Manager of the Sales and Marketing Group.…”

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links below and purchasing through them or our affiliate accounts at B&H Photo Video, SmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

  • Fujifilm camerasB&H
  • Fujifilm lensesB&H

Fujifilm Global: Fujifilm releases new mirrorless digital camera “FUJIFILM X-T30 ”

http://www.fujifilm.com/news/n190214_01.html

“Fujifilm releases new mirrorless digital camera “FUJIFILM X-T30 ”

– Equipped with new image sensor and image processing engine into a compact and lightweight body for the ultimate image quality
– Highly-accurate AF performance across the frame and fast / silent continuous shooting of up to 30fps* to capture every decisive moment
– Fine and smooth 4K video with high-resolution audio, meeting the needs of full-scale video production

February 14, 2019

FUJIFILM Corporation (President: Kenji Sukeno) is delighted to announce the launch of the FUJIFILM X-T30 mirrorless digital camera (X-T30) in late March 2019, the latest model to join the X Series, known for superior image quality delivered with the company’s proprietary color reproduction technology.

In its compact body that weighs just 383g, the X-T30 features the 26.1MP X-Trans™ CMOS 4 sensor** and the fast X-Processor 4 image processing engine to achieve the ultimate image quality. Furthermore, it offers highly accurate AF performance across the entire frame and silent continuous shooting capability of up to an impressive 30 fps*, ensuring that you would never miss a decisive photo opportunity in a variety of situations. The camera can also record 4K/30P*** video while applying “Film Simulation mode”, including the “ETERNA” with rich color grading, based on Fujifilm’s proprietary color reproduction technology. Its ability to record fine and smooth 4K video with high-resolution audio will meet the needs of those involved in full-scale video production.

The X-T30 inherits popular exterior design features of the current model, FUJIFILM X-T20 (X-T20), while providing excellent operability with a new grip design that enhances stable grip when holding the camera, a touchscreen panel display with improved response performance, and the “Focus Lever” that facilitates faster focusing operation. The camera is also equipped with the “Auto Mode Selector Lever” that allows you to instantaneously switch to a fully-automatic shooting mode, making it a perfect mirrorless digital camera for a broad range of users who want to enjoy premium-quality pictures.

*Only available when using the electronic shutter. The camera offers fast and silent continuous shooting of up to 30fps in a cropped frame equivalent to 16.6MP.

**X-Trans™ is a trademark or registered trademark of FUJIFILM Corporation. With the use of a proprietary highly aperiodic color filter array, the sensor minimizes moiré effects and false colors without the use of an optical low-pass filter.

***Capable of recording smooth 4K video at 30fps

1. Compact camera body that weighs just 383g and is equipped with the X Trans™ CMOS 4 sensor and high-speed X Processor 4 image processing engine to deliver ultimate image quality and versatile photographic expressions.

The X-T30’s compact camera body that weighs just 383g features the X-Trans™ CMOS 4 sensor (APS-C, no low pass filter) and high-speed X-Processor 4 image processing engine. Together, they deliver the class-leading 26.1MP resolution for digital cameras with an APS-C-size sensor, and achieve excellent noise-reduction performance. Furthermore, the sensitivity of ISO160, previously*4 available only as extended ISO, is now part of the normal ISO range. This is particularly useful when shooting in bright daylight outdoors or trying to achieve beautiful bokeh with a fast large-aperture lens.

The “Film Simulation mode”, which provides versatile color expressions with Fujifilm’s proprietary technology, now has the new “ETERNA mode”. This camera also offers “monochrome adjustments” for Film Simulation’s “ACROS” and “Monochrome” modes to achieve warm black and cool black.

The “Color Chrome Effect” produces deeper colors and gradation to broaden diversity in your photographic expressions.

*4 When compared to the X-Trans™ CMOS III sensor

2. Highly accurate AF performance across the entire frame and fast / silent continuous shooting capability of up to 30fps to capture a decisive moment in a wide range of situations

The X-Trans™ CMOS 4 sensor has 2.16 million phase detection pixels, about 4 times that of previous models*4, to expand the highly-accurate phase detection AF area to the entire frame (approximately 100%). When using the electronic shutter, the camera can deliver fast and silent continuous shooting of up to 30fps in a cropped frame equivalent to 16.6MP (1.25x crop). This means even a fast-moving subject, positioned away from the center of the frame, can be autofocused at an amazing speed and accuracy, ensuring that you will not miss a decisive shutter moment.

The X-Processor 4’s high processing speed and improved AF algorithm has boosted the camera’s capability to accurately detect human faces and eyes. The “Face Select function” has been also introduced to provide priority auto-focus on the face of a selected subject when multiple faces have been detected within a frame. The low-light limit for phase detection AF has been extended from +0.5EV on previous models*5 to -3EV, making on-screen phase detection AF available in very poor lighting such as at night or under a light source of limited luminosity, such as candlelight.

Evolved functionality of the “Advanced SR Auto mode” can be activated instantaneously with the use of the “Auto Mode Selector lever”, positioned on the camera body’s top panel. The camera automatically chooses the optimum shooting settings for a given scene out of 58 presets so that you can achieve the best image quality without having to worry about settings yourself.

*5 When compared to the X-T20

3. Newly-redesigned grip shape and the inclusion of the “Focus Lever” for outstanding operability

The X-T30 inherits popular exterior design features of the X-T20, while adopting a new grip design that makes the camera body sit comfortably in your hand. It also has the “Focus Lever”, replacing the “Selector Button”, to afford extra grip space at the rear. These design enhancements have created added hand-holding stability despite the camera’s compact and lightweight body, even when it is mounted with a large lens such as a telephoto zoom.

The rear LCD monitor uses a touchscreen panel display 1.3mm thinner than that on the X-T20. Its improved touchscreen response enables faster and more intuitive camera operations.

The X-T30 is available in the popular Black version the Silver version for a premium look with greater sheen, and the Charcoal Silver version*6, all representing a sense of high quality and robustness.

*6 Will be in store later than the Black and Silver version

4. Extensive video functions that meet the needs of full-scale video production

The X-T30’s new video features include the capability to record with high-resolution audio and track human eyes even during video recording. Smooth 4K/30P video can be recorded at 8bit 4:2:0 on an SD card, and also output to external storage media via the HDMI port at 10bit 4:2:2 to include more color information. The camera is also capable of F-log recording, which captures footage in wider gamut for later editing of color tones and luminosity. These extensive video functions cater to the needs of full-scale video production.

Video data, greater than what is required for 6K video, is scaled down to 4K to achieve advanced sharpness with minimal moiré. The camera supports recording in the DCI format (17:9 aspect ratio), used in digital cinemas, for dynamic video footage in high resolution.

The X-T30 can apply “Film Simulation mode”, popular for stills, while recording video, so that you can enjoy a diverse range of unique effects, including the “ETERNA” for rich color grading….”

fujifilm_x-t30_01_1920px
Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujinon XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR “Fujicron” prime lens. Photograph by Jonas Rask for Fujifilm.

Fujifilm X-T30

Commentary

fujinon_xf16mmf2.8_r_wr_04_1024px
Fujifilm’s “Fujicron” fast, compact prime lens collection as of February 2019 comprising the Fujinon XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR, Fujinon XF 23mm f/2.0 R WR, Fujinon XF 35mm f/2.0 R WR and Fujinon XF 50mm f/2.0 R WR lenses. These lenses are particularly suited to Fujifilm’s smaller cameras, while the Fujinon XF 27mm f.2.8 prime and Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/.28-4.0 R LM OIS are also well worth considering for use on the X-T30 and its compact siblings as well as larger Fujifilm cameras.

Fujifilm’s X-T30 DSLR-style APS-C premium compact hybrid camera has an impressive list of specifications   that position it just below the amazing X-T3 and make it a more than suitable companion, backup or replacement camera depending on the demands of your project.

I have yet to try it or its predecessor the Fujifilm X-T20 out yet so cannot speak to the pros and cons of its smaller size compared to its larger siblings, but based on my experience of the X-T3 assume that the X-T30 may be better suited to Fujifilm’s smaller lenses at right than the company’s larger, heavier optics.

I also suggest looking out for hand grips and L-plates to fit the X-T30 in order to give it a little more heft when mounting larger lenses.

Fujifilm’s product page indicates that its Hand Grip MHG-XT10 metal hand grip will fit and as I use the company’s hand grips on several Fujifilm cameras can strongly recommend them.

Fujifilm is portraying the X-T30 as “The Little Giant” and from its specifications list alone it clearly lives up to that nickname.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links below and purchasing through them or our affiliate accounts at B&H Photo Video, SmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

  • FUJIFILM Metal Hand Grip for X-T10, X-T20, and X-T30B&H
  • FUJIFILM X-E3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-T20 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-T30 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • Fujifilm XF Fujinon lensesB&H