Reviews of Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR Zoom Lens Are Mixed, Possible Problems When Shooting Video

The Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR wide-to-long zoom lens has been one of the most long wished-for, long-awaited optics for Fujifilm’s APS-C/Super35 system cameras in recent years, and early reports from Fujifilm X-Photographer have been positive, especially regarding its apparent parfocal lens design. 

But then one might well expect brand ambassadors to wax lyrical and skip over possible pre-production and early firmware defects given reasonable expectations that Fujifilm will get it right in the end or at least in time for offical product release date. 

Not quite this time, apparently, as Fujifilm recently issued firmware version 1.02 for this now-shipping lens and some reviewers are already hoping that further firmware updates are in the pipeline. 

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Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens.
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Fujifilm X-Pro3 pre-production model in Dura Black with pre-production Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens, as seen at a Ted’s World of Imaging Touch-and-Try event in Sydney.

I was lucky enough to have a short time with a preproduction version of the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom at a recent Ted’s World of Imaging touch-and-try event for the Fujifilm X-Pro3, and found it worked well enough when shooting event stills on a Fujifilm X-H1 unequipped with firmware updates for the lens.

The lens is situated price-wise in-between the pro-quality, pro-priced red badge Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR and the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS kit zoom, and there was some speculation that the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR might be bundled with later-release Fujifilm X-T3s or the coming X-T4 as a higher-specced kit lens, especially for video production.

The 16-80mm’s parfocal focusing is especially attractive for video use as well as the lens’ apparent 6 stops of optical image stabilization that helps make up for its f/4.0 maximum aperture when handholding in low lighting when used on non-stabilized cameras like the X-T3, X-Pro3 and the coming X-T4.

Questions about the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR’s optical qualities throughout its focal range were bandied about during the long pre-release period and I have yet to find a complete set of in-depth tests of the lens’ image quality and focusing performance.

In the meantime, pal2tech’s initial and subsequent video reviews have rather dampened my enthusiasm for the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR.

Are what he is seeing in action when shooting video in particular early production model teething problems, uneven quality assurance, limitations in current firmware or the outcome of too many design and engineering compromises?

Zoom lenses are a set of such compromises compared to prime lenses and a certain amount of them are to be expected, especially in a lens with a longer-than-usual focal length range, but has Fujifilm compromised way too much?

pal2tech’s videos may help you make up your own mind, but I would recommend going off in search of more reviews by video professionals before definitively deciding against the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR.

While some optical and autofocusing problems can be compensated for via firmware and during processing of raw stills images, video is more demanding of lens quality given that shortfalls in optical quality cannot be corrected in video non-linear editing software.

My experiences with Micro Four Thirds cameras and lenses, as well as Fujifilm’s APS-C/Super 35 gear, have amply proven the advantages of having a stabilized zoom lens in one’s kit when shooting documentary stills and video in trying conditions and available darkness rather than available light, so the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR would, theoretically, fill a yawning gap in my Fujinon lens collection.

Provided that it is as good for video as it seemed to be for stills during my all-too-short time with the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR at Ted’s.

Like many others, I have had high expectations for this lens given my longtime need for a gap-filling zoom lens for video and photography, and given the poor Australian dollar and consequent high price in local online and bricks-and-mortar stores.

Should I be reconsidering the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS kit zoom lens instead, and go off to ebay to look for the latter secondhand?

pal2tech: Fuji 16-80 Lens Review

pal2tech: Fujifilm 16-80mm Lens Firmware Update 1.01

pal2tech: Fujifilm 16-80 Lens Focus Problem Fix — Possible Solution

pal2tech: Fujifilm 16-80 Lens Firmware Update 1.02 – Can’t Test (and my thoughts)

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • FUJIFILM X-H1 Mirrorless Digital Camera Body with Battery Grip KitB&H – bundled with the unstabilized Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR, this stabilized camera may still be the current best option for video despite its older generation sensor and processor.
  • FUJIFILM X-Pro3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-T3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR Lens B&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS LensB&H

Videos About Two Australian X-Photographers Using X-Pro3 Digital Rangefinder Camera, Megan Lewis and Michael Coyne, Now Online

Australian photographers rarely if ever feature in camera and lens makers’ marketing materials and few Australia female photographers are invited to become brand ambassadors whether they are based in Australia or overseas. 

Documentary photographer Megan Lewis features in one of two recently-released Fujifilm X-Photographer videos about the X-Pro3 digital rangefinder-style camera with documentary photographer Michael Coyne being her male counterpart. 

Both are long-time Fujifilm users and are well-qualified to offer their insights into the X-Pro3 as a dedicated documentary and photojournalism stills camera. 

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Fujifilm X-Pro 3 with MHG-XPRO3 grip and Fujinon XF 35mm f/2.0 R WR prime lens. I prefer equipping my cameras with handgrips and vertical battery grips for versatility, stability and security when handholding lenses in a wide range of sizes and weights, although the smaller Fujinon lenses such as this XF 35mm f/1.4 R “Fujicron” standard prime lens may not benefit as much as larger prime and zoom lenses.

I have yet to have the pleasure of meeting either photographer, though I am keen to spend time with Megan Lewis to photograph her at work for ‘Unititled’ in order to show other female photographers that one can succeed as a documentary photographer or photojournalist.

In the immortal words of Geena Davis of the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media, “if she can see it, she can be it”, and so stories, photo essays and videos about female creatives like Megan Lewis are crucial to creating the possibility of women succeeding in their chosen professions to the point where we gain parity with men.

FUJIFILM X Series: Megan Lewis x X-Pro3 / FUJIFILM

FUJIFILM X Series: Different Breed: Michael Coyne x X-Pro3

Fujinon lenses used by Megan Lewis and Michael Coyne in these videos

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

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  • FUJIFILM X-Pro3 Mirrorless Digital Camera B&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS LensB&H – used by Megan Lewis
  • FUJIFILM XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR LensB&H – used by Michael Coyne

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Articles, Videos and Reviews By and About Fujifilm Brand Ambassadors, Staff Members and Others, Including Two Female X-Photographers!

Videos by and about camera brand ambassadors as well as product reviews by them, more properly referred to as articles given their often fiscal relationship with those brands, can be often frustrating affairs when needing to know how well the cameras and lenses in question perform in the field in the hands of users not unlike me. 

That is, self-funded independent documentary photographers and videographers.

I would love it if camera and lens makers made early efforts to get their gear to people like me for use in real assignments so we can hear how well or not it performs in the often demanding conditions in which we work.

The too-often generic overviews of just-released new gear by brand ambassadors and professional YouTube reviewers have their uses in painting broad-brush pictures, but they need to be rapidly followed by in-depth insights into performance in the field during real projects and for use in a range of specific moviemaking and photographic genres.

In my humble opinion.

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Fujifilm X-Pro 3 in Dura Black finish with MHG-XPRO3 grip and Fujinon XF 35mm f/2.0 R WR prime lens. I am a fan of hand grips and vertical battery grips for cameras, especially when shooting documentary stills and video or portraits in available light and especially when shooting in available darkness, for better grip and stability handheld. I always default to all-black cameras when I can to maintain some degree of stealth and so am in two minds about the “black” and “silver” DuraTect finishes on the two Dura versions of the X-Pro2. Should X-Pro3 purchasers trade stealth for durability? Is Dura Black as recessive as plain old black paint and thus less noticeable than Dura Silver?

Fujifilm has, in its marketing material, pitched the X-Pro3 at street photographers and photojournalists, and given photographing in the street is a form of documentary, one I prefer to know by the name of urban documentary, and the X-Pro3’s rangefinder form factor is just as appropriate to portraiture, event photography, other forms of documentary, fine art photography, travel photography and more genres besides given this camera has apparently radically improved on its predecessor’s optical viewfinder and electronic viewfinder.

When I wrote about the X-Pro2, I saw it as three cameras in one – a Leica or Contax-style OVF camera, an EVF camera like my Panasonics and a miniature view camera thanks to its excellent fixed LCD monitor.

Over the years I have relied on my X-Pro2 in all three camera guises, for architectural photography, portrait photography, photojournalism, urban documentary and product shots, just as I did with a range of rangefinder-style cameras in film formats from 35mm through 120 roll film up to 4″x5″ sheet film.

Even, in a pinch, for shooting 4K video in a way not dissimilar to how I used 8mm and Super 8 rangefinder movie cameras during the height of the analog era.

Seeing the world OVF-style is a rather different thing to seeing EVF-style and even DSLR-style when shooting stills and video, I have found, and it is good to get out of one’s comfort zone in a regular basis.

I have yet to study the X-Pro3’s specifications in any depth, and the same applies to the videos and articles I am sharing on this page, but it appears that the X-Pro3’s video capabilities are well beyond that of the X-Pro2 though they do not, of course, match those of the amazing X-T3 and are somewhat in the ball park of the oddly-timed X-H1.

Videos

Four videos featuring two female X-Photographers, one female retail store staff member and one unnamed female photographer against the usual slew of male photographers and professional reviewers. Surely camera makers can do better than this in this day and age?

  • AdoramaFujifilm X PRO3 | Hands On with Daniel Norton – “… X-Pro3 is a true photographer’s tool that combines all the feeling of film with all the quality of digital.”
  • bigheadtacoFirst Look: The Titanium Clad Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Warning: This is a long and nerdy video. If you want a shorter version, check out my shooting impressions video (link down below). Come back here if you want more details”
  • bigheadtacoFirst Shooting Impressions: Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “… I enjoyed using the unique articulating screen, the HVF is improved, and the updated firmware using the X Processor IV is impressive. “
  • Charlene WinfredX Pro3, A Different Breed – “Filmed o[n] the Fujifilm X-T3 and Fujinon XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6”
  • DPReviewDPReview TV: Fujifilm X-Pro3 Preview – Carbon Coated Classic or Titanium Trinket? – “Some might argue that Fujifilm’s new X-Pro3 rangefinder-style camera takes a page from the Leica playbook, omitting a full-time rear screen in favor of a more ‘pure’ shooting experience. Is the X-Pro3 a carbon-coated classic or a titanium trinket? Chris and Jordan aim to find out.”
  • Fuji Guys ChannelFuji Guys – FUJIFILM X-Pro3 – First Look – “Fuji Guys Francis and Billy give you a first look preview of the FUJIFILM X-Pro3.”
  • FUJIFILM France – Imaging BusinessCyril ABAD X Pro3 – “… Mes attentes en terme de vitesse d’AF, de réactivité, de fluidité de l’EVF sont satisfaites. Le X-Pro3 est plus rapide, plus précis.”
  • FUJIFILM UKLooking back, moving forward. – The New X-Pro3! – “Say hello to the all-new X-Pro3. The exciting newcomer to our X-Pro range has been designed to minimise distractions, keeping you focused on the craft of photography. Watch the video to discover some of its exciting new features.” – depicts an unnamed female photographer.
  • Fujifilm X / GFX España OficialX-Photographer Matías Costa – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “El #XPhotographer Matías Costa fue seleccionado por FUJIFILM Corporation como uno de los integrantes del selecto grupo de probadores oficiales de la cámara #Fujifilm #XPro3. El resultado de su trabajo es el proyecto “La triple frontera de Gibraltar”. “
  • FUJIFILM X SeriesDifferent Breed: Alberto Selvestrel x X-Pro3 – “Italian photographer Alberto Selvestrel shoots on FUJIFILM X-Pro3.”
  • FUJIFILM X SeriesDifferent Breed: Eric Bouvet x X-Pro3 – “French X-Photographer Eric Bouvet shoots on FUJIFILM X-Pro3.”
  • FUJIFILM X SeriesDifferent Breed: Patrick La Roque x X-Pro3 – “Canadian X-Photographer Patrick La Roque shoots on FUJIFILM X-Pro3.”
  • FUJIFILM X SeriesDifferent Breed: Tomasz Lazar x X-Pro3 – “Polish X-Photographer Tomasz Lazar shoots on X-Pro3”
  • FUJIFILM X Series“FUJIFILM X-Pro3 “Create within Chaos” / FUJIFILM” – “Create within Chaos” X-Pro3″
  • Fujifilm X SingaporeFujifilm Singapore x Mindy Tan: Episode 1- Fuji Girl Series (X-PRO3)“Using the Fujifilm X-Pro3, how can we photograph strangers? What motivates this documentary photographer? Learn from Mindy Tan, a Fujifilm X-photographer.”
  • Gerald UndoneFUJIFILM X-Pro3: 7 Things to Love About This Camera
  • Gordon LaingFujifilm X-Pro 3 preview: HANDS-ON first looks – “Hands-on first-looks preview of the Fujifilm X-Pro 3 camera! CORRECTION: Sorry, no 10 bit video, it’s 8-bit only, but the USB C can be used for headphones.”
  • Kai WFujifilm X-Pro 3 Hands on First Impressions – “What the flip?!”
  • Kevin MullinsFujifilm X-Pro 3 Review and Feature Overview – “… It’s a camera that may divide opinion, but if you are looking for a camera that will last forever, is amazingly quick, tactile and, in my opinion, the best Fujifilm camera fro Street Photography and Reportage work – this is the camera for you….”
  • Lee ZavitzFujifilm X-Pro3 – Hands On Review – “So I was able to test out the new Fuji X-Pro3 for a week now and I made sure to shoot with it a lot! So much that I feel like it’s safe to call this a review. How do you feel about the hidden screen / Sub display? Love it or No?”
  • Matt BrandonFujifilm X-Pro3 – Review – “Just days before the official release of the new Fujifilm X-Pro3, I managed to get my Friends at Fujifilm Malaysia to send me a sample camera. It was a preproduction. I say this because it had some very beta firmware in it, making it impossible to test out many of the new features. But the real buzz about this camera isn’t the latest software or new features like HDR and even the new film simulation, it is about the new design of the camera. The new LDC display or lack of it – so to speak. It features a controversial hidden display. In this video, only hours after I received the camera, I took it for a spin. Special thanks for Fujifilm Malaysia for the loan of the camera.”
  • Matti HaapojaFUJIFILM X-Pro 3 REVIEW – Film Look Straight In Camera?
  • The Art of PhotographyHANDS ON with the Fujifilm X-Pro 3!! – “It doesn’t have all the video options that the X-T3 does, but this camera is designed for still shooters. Having said that you still get 4k video and 8 bit log. I filmed all of the b-roll footage of the actual camera with an X-Pro 3.”
  • Theoria ApophasisX-PRO3 CLOSE LOOK & UNIQUE DETAILS!
  • Wex Photo Video –Fujifilm X-Pro3: Vintage Meets Tech | Real-world Test“… in this video Amy gets her hands on the new Fujifilm X-Pro3, along with several fast prime lenses.”

Articles, Reviews and Other Links

Two articles with more to come by Fujifilm Nordic X-Photographer Charlene Winfred, who is featured in the video at the top of this page.

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • FUJIFILM X-Pro3 Mirrorless Digital Camera B&H
  • Fujifilm XF LensesB&H

Three Blind Men and An Elephant Productions: FujiFilm X-Pro3: Dangerous!

“A modest dissertation on the X-Pro3 development announcement, clickbait and the diminution of language.”

fujifiom_x-pro3_preproduction_01_1080px
Image of pre-production Fujifilm X-Pro3 from video of Fujifilm X Summit Shibuya 2019 on September 20, 2019.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • Fujifilm Cameras B&H
  • Fujifilm LensesB&H

bigheadtaco: First Look: Fujifilm XF16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR

“It’s been a while since Fujifilm released a wide to medium range zoom lens, especially with both OIS and WR. Previously, the only general range zoom lens that had both features was the big and bulky XF18-135mm lens. My hope was that Fujifilm would re-make the XF18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS lens to be XF16-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS WR. Instead, Fujifilm decided to keep the original kit lens and create the new XF 16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR. Who is this lens for? It really depends. If you own the X-T3 and you really want a mid-range zoom lens with both OIS and WR, this is the only option you have. However, if you own the X-H1, would you be better off with the XF 16-55mm f/2.8 and put up with the size and weight of a professional lens? “

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Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens.

Commentary

Good to see that photographers are receiving pre-production copies of Fujifilm’s Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR and, as usual, even more reviews will be appearing when production versions of the lens make their way into the world.

When I was photographing the climate strike rally in Sydney on September 20, I found myself wondering how the 16-80mm f/4.0 zoom lens might change and even improve the way I cover such subjects.

See my personal Instagram account for documentary photographs of the rally and other events, recently mostly using prime lenses on Fujifilm cameras as Panasonic Lumix camera and lens loaners have been in short supply.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • Fujifilm Cameras B&H
  • Fujifilm LensesB&H

Fujifilm X Summit Shibuya 2019 and the Fujinon XF 33mm f/1.0 Super Fast Prime Lens

First topic to be tackled at Fujifilm’s X Summit Shibuya 2019 on September 20 was lenses and specifically the Fujinon XF 33mm f/1.0 superfast standard prime lens so often requested by Fujifilm aficionados in online polls such as those run by Patrick Di Vino of Fuji Rumors. 

Before tackling that lens, though, the soon-to-be-released Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR standard zoom lens was displayed onstage and its size and apparent weight hinted at it soon being a very in-demand lens and a viable alternative to Fujifilm’s three other standard zoom lenses, the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS kit lens, the Fujinon XF 18-135mm f/3.5-5.6 R LM OIS WR travel lens and the Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR Red Badge premium-quality lens. 

The surprise of the lens segment, though, was the 33mm f/1.0 being shelved in favour of a Fujinon XF 50mm f/1.0 prime lens due to size and weight problems Fujifilm encountered in the design process. 

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Leica worked out the best prime lens focal length line-up for documentary photography and photojournalism in 35mm years ago and it remains the benchmark and role model for other lens makers to this very day. The only focal length missing from this lens collection is 40mm, which Leica made for the Leica CL rangefinder camera which was later taken over by Minolta as the Minolta CLE with 40mm standard lens as well as a 28mm and 90mm lens. Too many contemporary lens makers leave out 28mm and 75mm lenses and their equivalents for other sensor formats. Why? Both these focal lengths are the most essential for documentary photography and photojournalism.

I was not cut up about Fujifilm swapping the 50mm f/1.0 for the 33mm f/1.0 given I have never been a fan of 50mm and thereabouts standard lenses and their 33mm to 35mm equivalents in APS-C/Super 35 sensor cameras.

I much prefer 40mm equivalent “perfect normal” standard lenses due to their versatility and and proximity to the effects of human vision, finding 50mm lenses a little too much like short telephotos.

I often carry an X-Pro2 with Fujinon XF 27mm f/2.8 “pancake” lens attached and love this focal length as much for use in video as stills photography, for portraiture and interviews as much for multiple figure documentary work.

I even rely on my 27mm f/2.8 lens for handheld product shots, though in other camera systems and sensor sizes I tend more towards 50mm equivalents due to these lenses often being given away with the camera or at least at give-away prices.

I would love it if Fujifilm produced a weather-resistant aperture ring-equipped 27mm lens with manual clutch focus in line with the company’s commitment to pro-quality video production, to sit alongside the similarly-designed XF 14mm f/2.8 R, XF 16mm f/1.4 R WR and XF 23mm f/1.4 R lenses.

While Fujifilm’s X-mount Fujinon MKX 18-55mm T2.9 and MKX 50-135mm T2.9 parfocal cinema zoom lens pair appears to be an excellent solution for video production, we also need prime lenses more suitable for cinematography and stills photography on Fujifilm’s hybrid cameras.

Fujifilm’s surprise XF 50mm f/1.0 would make a suitable 75mm equivalent lens for stills and video as would a revamped XF 35mm f/1.4 R so long as both are also equipped with manual clutch focus.

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Nikon Micro-Nikkor 105mm f/2.8 manual focus, manual exposure macro lens, the lens with which I became a portrait photographer.

If Fujifilm’s lens designers can retain the optical qualities of the current 35mm f/1.4 lens, often referred to as the “god lens”, but encased inside a fast autofocusing, weather resistant, manual clutch focus housing then we would have a decent set of matched primes  for Fujifilm’s X-Tn and X-Hn series cameras as a viable alternative to the MKX zooms.

Even better would be if Fujifilm produced a fast maximum aperture 70mm prime lens, equivalent to 105mm in the 35mm sensor format.

Although portrait photography benefits from access to a range of standard or normal to longer focal lengths, from 40mm through 50mm, 75mm and 105mm to even longer ones contained within the Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS Red Badge zoom lens, my personal preference for most portrait work is 105mm given I started in portraiture with Nikon’s Micro-Nikkor 105mm f/2.8 in my art school days and still yearn for a Fujinon APS-C equivalent.

A wider maximum aperture than f/2.8 would be even better, something closer to Sigma’s 105mm f/1.4 DG HSM Art lens than its 105mm f/2.8 Macro lens.

I might add that the 18mm focal length in APS-C and Super 35, equivalent to 28mm in the 35mm sensor format, is my number one preference for documentary cinematography and stills photography, and the lack of a professional quality 18mm prime lens in Fujifilm’s X-mount system is a constant thorn in my side.

If such a lens existed it would take up permanence residence on my prime documentary camera with a, preferably, fast 75mm or even a 105mm equivalent lens on my second cameras in a two-camera, two-lens documentary set-up.

Think Nick Nolte’s photojournalist in Under Fire or David Douglas Duncan with a long lens on an SLR and a wide lens on a Leica M-Series rangefinder camera.

Imagine a matched set of top-quality lenses for stills and video to choose from consisting of 14mm, 16mm, 18mm, 23mm, 27mm, 35mm, 50mm, 56mm and 70mm, all with weather resistance, manual clutch focus, fast autofocus and aperture rings.

No more hoping that third party lens makers might somehow see fit to come up with a full set of matched manual focusing optics so that Fujifilm’s Super 35-shooting X-mount cameras might have the video prime lenses they so richly deserve.

Documentary photographs using a two-camera, two prime lens set-up

Prime lens alternatives to the Fujinon XF 50mm f/1.0

My first two lenses for the X-Pro2 were the Fujinon XF 23mm f/1.4 R and Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R, and my choice was based on the available light documentary-style wedding photography practices of Kevin Mullins as generously shared on his website f16.click.

My budget was limited so other lenses on my list for consideration then, the Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0 and Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 R OIS kit zoom, had to be excluded.

Over the years I have found the XF 56mm f/1.2 R to be an excellent portrait lens with the aperture set at or near f/1.2.

The 56mm’s downsides are the slowness of its focusing motors, its lack of manual clutch focus, that its closest focusing distance is not close enough for my full face portrait style, and its 84mm focal length equivalence means I often must step back too much when framing groups of people in crowds for images like the ones above.

Kevin Mullins’ style is not mine and it has been a long time since I photographed weddings to put myself through university art school.

Mr Mullins appears to mostly photograph weddings with wide open aperture, in program mode, and in search of a blurry, gritty, grainy, funky look whereas my ways of seeing and photographing derive from the deep focus and laser beam sunlight-lit places in which I grew up.

I have tried the Fujinon XF 50mm f/2.0 R WR out for urban documentary and it performed well, alone and in combination with the Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0 and that pairing has worked in a similar way to when I relied on Leica M-Series rangefinder cameras with 28mm and 75mm Leica lenses.

The Fujinon XF 50mm f/2.0 R WR in combo with the Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0

If only Fujifilm would at least update its 18mm f/2.0 to match the optical and mechanical quality of its 50mm f/2.0, or even better come up with an f/1.4 18mm manual clutch focus alternative for video production and stills photography.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • Fujifilm Cameras B&H
  • Fujifilm LensesB&H

Fuji Rumors: Some LOVE the Fujifilm X-Pro3, and Here is Why!

https://www.fujirumors.com/some-love-the-fujifilm-x-pro3-and-here-is-why/

“Today I thought I try to balance out the X-Pro3 sh*tstorm, by sharing a few stories of people, who actually either like or understand (and hence accept) the new X-Pro3 hidden tilt screen concept.

If you ask me personally, I admit that my first reaction was also something like “what the heck is this?”

But you know what I have learned from reading the massive (and brilliant) essays of Michel de Montaigne?

I have learned that we should try to “suspend our judgment”….”

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The tilting LCD monitor on the Fujifilm X-Pro3 digital rangefinder camera. Still frame from live streaming video of Fujifilm X-Pro3 from Fujifilm X Summit on 20th September 2019.

Commentary

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Fujifilm TX-1 35mm panorama camera. Image courtesy of Japan Camera Hunter. Fujifilm has been producing cutting-edge rangefinder cameras for decades.

Suspension of judgement is exactly what is needed in this moment between Fujifilm revealing the X-Pro3 at its recent X Summit Shibuya 2019 and the first appearance of production versions of the camera in the specialist media and retailers.

Fujifilm is clearly going through a process of differentiation and granulation with its current and coming camera offerings, pushing the X-Pro series even further into rangefinder photography camera territory.

When the X-Pro1 was released, there was no X-Tn series and certainly no X-Hn series, and no mention at all of any possible GFX medium format cameras.

All our hopes were in the one basket but now there are non-rangefinder-style alternatives like the X-T3, X-T30 and soon, hopefully, the X-H2 to realize all the promise revealed in the X-H1 that was thwarted somewhat by its X-T2 generation sensor and processor.

I still love shooting 4K video with my X-Pro2 when needed and when it is the only camera I am carrying at the time, which is almost every day, and was saddened by the limited video functionality Fujifilm gave us in the relevant firmware update, but heavy video production requires the use of cameras with heavyweight video firmware functionality.

Right now, the Fujifilm X-T3 makes an excellent Super 35 video camera for use with gimbals and other forms of traditional stabilization via hardware, and OIS-equipped zoom lenses are also a good solution when shooting handheld video.

The coming Fujifilm X-H2 needs to take a leaf from Panasonic’s book, learning the lessons of the Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5, the GH5S and the S1H and then surpassing them with all the hardware features and firmware functionality required for handheld or heavily-rigged video production.

I am looking forward to learning more about the X-Pro3’s improved optical viewfinder and especially its improved electronic viewfinder, the latter one of the weakest aspects of the X-Pro2 despite its other many strengths as a documentary camera.

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Fuji Rumors Publishes Sketches of Fujifilm X-Pro3, Fujifilm X Summit Shibuya Scheduled for 1:00PM GMT, September 20, 2019

Patrick Di Vino of Fuji Rumors has done it again with a series of rumors about the much-anticipated Fujifilm X-Pro3 and which hardware features will make it into the successor to the Fujifilm X-Pro1 and X-Pro2. 

Mr Di Vino’s sources tend to be reliable and apparently none more so than the individual who supplied Fuji Rumors with a set of hand sketches of the X-Pro3, featuring several surprises including removal of the D-Pad and the addition of a downwards hinged LCD monitor. 

Will Fujifilm supply more information about the X-Pro3 at Friday’s Fujifilm X Summit Shibuya event? 

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Fujifilm X-Pro2 black with Fujinon XF 35mm f/2.0 R WR “Fujicron” prime lens and Fujifilm X-Pro2 graphite with Fujinon XF 23mm f/2.0 R WR “Fujicron” prime lens.
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Fujifilm X-Pro1 with Fujinon XF 35mm f/1.4 R prime lens. Although I badly needed this camera, Fujifilm’s first interchangeable lens X-Series camera, to supplement my Fujifilm X100 for use in charity documentary work, I had to forgo buying it due to its lack of built-in diopter correction, instead turning to Panasonic’s excellent Micro Four Thirds cameras with the added benefit of great video capabilities. I bought back in to Fujifilm after the X-Pro2 was released along with second generation and later interchangeable lenses that surpassed the turgidly slow focusing mechanisms of the first generation lenses including the Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0 R, XF 35mm f/1.4 R and XF 60mm f/2.4 R Macro.

Although Fujifilm generally listens to its user base and mostly acts positively on their requests, the company has been known to make some very odd decisions and none more so than the X-Pro1’s lack of the diopter correction essential for those of us needing to wear eyeglasses while we work.

As a result of that and other problems with its first generation professional-tagged rangefinder-style camera and lenses, Fujifilm lost me as a customer for several years while I explored another of the triumvirate of affordable digital photography and video innovators, Blackmagic Design, Fujifilm and Panasonic.

The many benefits of, for example, Panasonic’s fully-articulated LCD monitors on cameras like the Lumix DMC-GH4, DMC-GX8, DC-GH5, DC-GH5S, DC-G9 and more recently the coming 35mm sensor-equipped Lumix DC-S1H, became readily apparent when using these cameras for documentary stills photography and video.

Going from full articulation to the many and various one, two and three-way tilting monitors is feasible but uncomfortable, with too many sacrifices to be made in losing that key functionality and if every pro-level hybrid camera followed Panasonic’s lead then I would be very happy.

But then, cameras with fixed monitors or no monitors at all are not outside the bounds of usability either, so long as one does not need them for work in a wide range of genres from studio-based still-life to architecture, portraiture and documentary cinematography and photography, as I do.

I can do without any form of articulation on the X-Pro3’s LCD monitor if Fujifilm improves its electronic viewfinder way beyond the X-Pro2’s often irritating EVF, but I would most certainly need to add an X-T3 to my kit for everything else other than documentary photography or turn to Panasonic to affordably fill the gap.

I can do without the X-Pro’s D-Pad on an X-Pro3 so long as the camera’s Q Menu allows access to all the camera’s essential functions.

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Leica M-D (Typ 262), without LCD monitor or function buttons. Radical purism for those who can afford it.

I can do without yet another analog film simulation so long as the X-Pro3’s video functionality is improved beyond that of the X-Pro2’s pointlessly crippled video, as I was reminded this afternoon when in a situation that could just as easily have demanded recording video as much as stills depending on a possible sudden turn of events.

I can do without in-body image stabilisation aka IBIS on the X-Pro3 so long as the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR proves to be the one-lens documentary cinematography and photography solution I have long been hoping for.

I look forward to learning more about the X-Pro3 and hope that Fujifilm has not taken an absurdly purist approach in imitation of, for example, Leica and its monitorless M10-D.

As much as I love Leica M-Series rangefinder cameras and lenses, and have a long history with them dating almost back to my start in professional photography during the analog era, most of what I do these days demands more of a camera than some sort of perverse ideological purism.

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Limited edition black Contax G2 with Zeiss Planar 45mm f/2.0 T* prime lens. Image by Japan Camera Hunter.

Leica was not the only maker of rangefinder cameras throughout the long history of analog photography, and the Leica M-Series is not the only role model available.

 

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Fujifilm Australia’s People with Cameras, Darling Island Wharf, Sydney, September 7, 2019

I always try to attend Fujifilm’s annual People with Cameras in Sydney each year and was able to be there for much of this year’s event held at Doltone House on Darling Island Wharf in Pyrmont on Saturday the 7th September 2019. 

More female photographers seem to attend each year, a welcome trend given the low numbers of female photographers and moviemakers who manage to make it professionally in Australia in particular and globally in general. 

Those low numbers are not from want of talent but from systemic issues favouring male practitioners and thus the peculiarities of the male gaze and the male power structure, but I am hopeful that female representation in all aspects of photography and moviemaking will continue increasing to the point of parity, rapidly rather than slowly. 

Gentleman behind the Fujifilm Australia table, photographed with Fujifilm X-H1 and Fujifilm XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR telephoto zoom lens as raw file processed with Adobe Photoshop and Alien Skin Exposure X4 using a modified Polaroid Type 55 preset. I borrowed the lens to make this shot then returned it, but would love to try it out extensively before considering buying one.
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Attendee trying out Fujifilm GFX 100 medium format camera, photographed with Fujifilm X-T3 and Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR standard zoom lens.


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Fujifilm X-H1 with Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR Red Badge professional zoom lens.

I carried a Think Tank Photo MindShift Gear BackLight 26L backpack containing my Fujifilm X-Pro2, a borrowed Fujifilm X-H1, a Fujinon XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR and a Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0 R lens both of which were also borrowed, and my own Fujinon XF 23mm f/1.4 R, Fujinon 27mm f/2.8 and Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R lenses.

I managed to very briefly borrow a Fujinon XF 50-140mm f/2.8 R LM OIS WR and a pre-production model of the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR standard zoom lens which is due for release later this year.

I ended up swapping between my 56mm lens and the borrowed 18mm lens for this event but wondered if I might have been better served by the 50-140mm zoom lens or the 50mm f/2.0 prime in conjunction with the 16mm lens or the reportedly excellent Fujinon XF 16mm f/1.4 R WR.

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SLR Magic MicroPrime Cinema 18mm T2.8 Fujifilm X-Mount.

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