Firmware Update: X-Pro2 Firmware update, Version: 5.10, Last Updated: 09.17.2020

https://fujifilm-x.com/global/support/download/firmware/cameras/x-pro2/

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Fujifilm X-Pro2 digital rangefinder camera with Fujinon XF 23mm f/2.0 R WR “Fujicron” lens and Fujifilm MHG-XPRO2 metal hand grip, a necessity when attaching lenses larger than this one.

Detail of the firmware update

Ver.5.10

The firmware update Ver.5.10 from Ver.5.01 incorporates the following issue:

  1. Camera performance used with the XF50mmF1.0 R WR is optimized.
  2. The phenomenon is fixed that in a multiple-flash shooting where the EF-X500 is used as a commander, flashes in some groups sometimes don’t fire correctly. Also in case the EF-X500 is used as a commander and the EF-60 as a remote flash, upgrade the camera firmware to the latest version.
  3. Fix of minor bugs.

Links

Firmware Update: Free firmware update for FUJINON XF50mmF1.0 R WR Lens

https://fujifilm-x.com/global/global-news/2020/0917_3724073/

September 17, 2020
FUJIFILM Corporation

To our customers:

FUJIFILM Corporation is due to release a free firmware update for FUJINON XF50mmF1.0 R WR on September 17, 2020.

This latest update enhances the lens’ AF speed and enables Color Shading Correction to mitigate subtle color casts when images are made at the lens’ maximum F1.0 aperture. Please note that the lens must be connected to a supported X Series camera body for the firmware enhancements to take effect.

Links

Press Release: Fujifilm Heralds in a New Age of Portrait Photography with the Fujinon XF 50mm f/1.0 R WR Lens

https://fujifilm-x.com/en-au/global-news/2020/0903_3719517/

Today Fujifilm published the press release and product shots for its superfast Fujinon XF 50mm f/1.0 R WR prime lens, designed for the company’s APS-C/Super 35 sensor-equipped interchangeable lens cameras including the X-Pro3 digital rangefinder and the X-T4 DSLR-style camera. 

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Fujinon XF 50mm f/1.0 R WR superfast prime lens. Image courtesy of Fujifilm.

FUJIFILM heralds in a new age of portrait photography with the FUJINON XF50mmF1.0 R WR Lens

The World’s First F1.0 lens with Autofocus

September 3, 2020

FUJIFILM Australia Pty Ltd is pleased to announce the launch of the FUJINON XF50mmF1.0 R WR Lens (hereafter “XF50mmF1.0 R WR”), the world’s first autofocus lens with a maximum aperture of F1.0, designed for mirrorless cameras. This is the 35th interchangeable lens for X Series digital cameras, delivering exceptional image quality using FUJIFILM’s unparalleled colour reproduction technology.

The XF50mmF1.0 R WR is an ultra-fast mid-telephoto prime lens with a focal length of 50mm (equivalent to 76mm in the 35mm film format) and a maximum aperture of F1.0. As FUJIFILM’s fastest interchangeable lens to date, it features a large-diameter design delivering incomparable resolving power and beautiful bokeh effects. The lens can also deliver edge-to-edge sharpness, showing versatility in the way it produces images.

The inclusion of a DC autofocus motor into the XF50mmF1.0 R WR allows for quick and accurate autofocus when images are captured at the maximum F1.0 aperture. With an extremely shallow depth of field, the lens also utilises the X Series cameras’ Face / Eye AF function to achieve sharp focus. This is especially important when capturing portraits, which is something that is quite difficult to achieve when focusing manually.

For times when manual focus is required, such as during video-recording, the manual focus ring provides 120 degrees of rotation to allow for precise, enhanced control and quick travel through the focus range to infinity. Lastly, despite being a large-diameter F1.0 lens, its weight, size and weather-sealing make it a practical choice for any professional photographer.

Key features of the XF50mmF1.0 R WR include:

(1) Achieve an incredibly shallow depth of field

The XF50mmF1.0 R WR consists of 12 lens elements in nine groups, including one aspherical element and two ED elements to achieve optimum control of spherical aberration. Used at or near its maximum aperture of F1.0, the XF50mmF1.0 R WR can produce an astonishingly shallow depth of field. Its precisely engineered, rounded diaphragm produces large, smooth bokeh in a professional fashion, allowing users to create clean portraits with almost true-to-life quality and edge-to-edge sharpness. Users can take advantage of this new feature to exclusively focus on the subject’s eyes, making captivating close-up character studies. The lens is not just for portraits. Take it out onto the street or into a lifestyle session and users can turn cluttered locations into clean backdrops with unrivaled subject separation.

(2) Be ready to make images more easily in low-light conditions

The large maximum aperture on the XF50mmF1.0 R WR means there are more options when it comes to capturing images in low-light conditions. At night, or in darkened interiors, the XF50mmF1.0 R WR offers the widest aperture on an XF Lens to date, allowing more light to be brought into an image. The XF50mmF1.0 R WR also easily achieves fast shutter speeds that freeze movement and keep ISO settings lower for detail-rich results. Alternatively, users can combine high ISO settings with the F1.0 aperture for incredible versatility and apply this to other low-light situations like astrophotography.

(3) World’s first F1.0 autofocus lens for mirrorless cameras

As the world’s first autofocus F1.0 lens made for any mirrorless system, including full-frame cameras, the XF50mmF1.0 R WR brings more light to the sensor than any previous XF lens. This makes it possible for the autofocus to operate at -7EV luminance level. The previous limit of -6EV luminance level is achieved using lenses with a maximum aperture of F1.4. X Series users now have fast and precise low-light autofocus, even when used in near-darkness. With the added benefits of on-sensor Phase Detection Autofocus (PDAF), Face/ Eye AF and a powerful DC motor, precise and fast autofocus at shallow depths of field is now a possibility.

(4) Precise focus for those critical moments

To make the most of its extremely shallow depth of field, focusing must be precise. As a result, the XF50mmF1.0 R WR has a focus ring eight times more accurate than any previous XF lens. This makes it possible to change the focus from the minimum focusing distance to infinity with precision. For this, the XF50mmF1.0 R WR comes with a focus ring with 120 degrees of rotation to let users focus manually without error, as well as achieve accurate focus when using the X Series camera’s Focus Peaking and Focus Assist modes. The 120 degrees rotation also makes autofocus movements notably effortless and precise, while the lens’s engineering is designed to minimise focus shift effects while capturing images.

(5) Engineered to keep the images coming

With fast shutter speeds and a large aperture of F1.0, the XF50mmF1.0 R WR is a lens that enables users to take amazing pictures almost anywhere. Measuring 103.5mm (4.07 inches) long and weighing 845 grams (1.86 pounds), the lens is compact and portable. Like all other weather-resistant XF lenses, it is sealed in 11 locations to protect it from moisture and dust, as well as being capable of use in temperatures down to -10°C (14°F). When attached to a similarly specified, weather-resistant X Series mirrorless digital camera body, the XF50mmF1.0 R WR allows users to create unique images in the toughest environments.

*Users are advised to update their camera’s firmware to the latest version in order to allow colour shading correction at the angle of incidence for F1.0.

Product name, release date and price

Product name: XF50mmF1.0 R WR
Release date: Late September, 2020
Recommended retail price (inc. GST): $AU 2,799.00

For media enquiries, please contact:

Stephanie Qiu, CampaignLab
stephanie@campaignlab.com.au
+61 470 178 743

Nadia Fidler, CampaignLab
nadia@campaignlab.com.au
+61 411 592 524

Fujifilm XF 50mm f/1.0 R WR

Images courtesy of Fujifilm Australia.

Links

Reviews of Fujifilm Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR Zoom Lens Are Mixed, Possible Problems When Shooting Video

The Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR wide-to-long zoom lens has been one of the most long wished-for, long-awaited optics for Fujifilm’s APS-C/Super35 system cameras in recent years, and early reports from Fujifilm X-Photographer have been positive, especially regarding its apparent parfocal lens design. 

But then one might well expect brand ambassadors to wax lyrical and skip over possible pre-production and early firmware defects given reasonable expectations that Fujifilm will get it right in the end or at least in time for offical product release date. 

Not quite this time, apparently, as Fujifilm recently issued firmware version 1.02 for this now-shipping lens and some reviewers are already hoping that further firmware updates are in the pipeline. 

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Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens.
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Fujifilm X-Pro3 pre-production model in Dura Black with pre-production Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens, as seen at a Ted’s World of Imaging Touch-and-Try event in Sydney.

I was lucky enough to have a short time with a preproduction version of the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom at a recent Ted’s World of Imaging touch-and-try event for the Fujifilm X-Pro3, and found it worked well enough when shooting event stills on a Fujifilm X-H1 unequipped with firmware updates for the lens.

The lens is situated price-wise in-between the pro-quality, pro-priced red badge Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR and the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS kit zoom, and there was some speculation that the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR might be bundled with later-release Fujifilm X-T3s or the coming X-T4 as a higher-specced kit lens, especially for video production.

The 16-80mm’s parfocal focusing is especially attractive for video use as well as the lens’ apparent 6 stops of optical image stabilization that helps make up for its f/4.0 maximum aperture when handholding in low lighting when used on non-stabilized cameras like the X-T3, X-Pro3 and the coming X-T4.

Questions about the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR’s optical qualities throughout its focal range were bandied about during the long pre-release period and I have yet to find a complete set of in-depth tests of the lens’ image quality and focusing performance.

In the meantime, pal2tech’s initial and subsequent video reviews have rather dampened my enthusiasm for the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR.

Are what he is seeing in action when shooting video in particular early production model teething problems, uneven quality assurance, limitations in current firmware or the outcome of too many design and engineering compromises?

Zoom lenses are a set of such compromises compared to prime lenses and a certain amount of them are to be expected, especially in a lens with a longer-than-usual focal length range, but has Fujifilm compromised way too much?

pal2tech’s videos may help you make up your own mind, but I would recommend going off in search of more reviews by video professionals before definitively deciding against the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR.

While some optical and autofocusing problems can be compensated for via firmware and during processing of raw stills images, video is more demanding of lens quality given that shortfalls in optical quality cannot be corrected in video non-linear editing software.

My experiences with Micro Four Thirds cameras and lenses, as well as Fujifilm’s APS-C/Super 35 gear, have amply proven the advantages of having a stabilized zoom lens in one’s kit when shooting documentary stills and video in trying conditions and available darkness rather than available light, so the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR would, theoretically, fill a yawning gap in my Fujinon lens collection.

Provided that it is as good for video as it seemed to be for stills during my all-too-short time with the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR at Ted’s.

Like many others, I have had high expectations for this lens given my longtime need for a gap-filling zoom lens for video and photography, and given the poor Australian dollar and consequent high price in local online and bricks-and-mortar stores.

Should I be reconsidering the Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS kit zoom lens instead, and go off to ebay to look for the latter secondhand?

pal2tech: Fuji 16-80 Lens Review

pal2tech: Fujifilm 16-80mm Lens Firmware Update 1.01

pal2tech: Fujifilm 16-80 Lens Focus Problem Fix — Possible Solution

pal2tech: Fujifilm 16-80 Lens Firmware Update 1.02 – Can’t Test (and my thoughts)

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • FUJIFILM X-H1 Mirrorless Digital Camera Body with Battery Grip KitB&H – bundled with the unstabilized Fujinon XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR, this stabilized camera may still be the current best option for video despite its older generation sensor and processor.
  • FUJIFILM X-Pro3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-T3 Mirrorless Digital CameraB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 16-55mm f/2.8 R LM WR LensB&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR Lens B&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS LensB&H

Videos About Two Australian X-Photographers Using X-Pro3 Digital Rangefinder Camera, Megan Lewis and Michael Coyne, Now Online

Australian photographers rarely if ever feature in camera and lens makers’ marketing materials and few Australia female photographers are invited to become brand ambassadors whether they are based in Australia or overseas. 

Documentary photographer Megan Lewis features in one of two recently-released Fujifilm X-Photographer videos about the X-Pro3 digital rangefinder-style camera with documentary photographer Michael Coyne being her male counterpart. 

Both are long-time Fujifilm users and are well-qualified to offer their insights into the X-Pro3 as a dedicated documentary and photojournalism stills camera. 

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Fujifilm X-Pro 3 with MHG-XPRO3 grip and Fujinon XF 35mm f/2.0 R WR prime lens. I prefer equipping my cameras with handgrips and vertical battery grips for versatility, stability and security when handholding lenses in a wide range of sizes and weights, although the smaller Fujinon lenses such as this XF 35mm f/1.4 R “Fujicron” standard prime lens may not benefit as much as larger prime and zoom lenses.

I have yet to have the pleasure of meeting either photographer, though I am keen to spend time with Megan Lewis to photograph her at work for ‘Unititled’ in order to show other female photographers that one can succeed as a documentary photographer or photojournalist.

In the immortal words of Geena Davis of the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media, “if she can see it, she can be it”, and so stories, photo essays and videos about female creatives like Megan Lewis are crucial to creating the possibility of women succeeding in their chosen professions to the point where we gain parity with men.

FUJIFILM X Series: Megan Lewis x X-Pro3 / FUJIFILM

FUJIFILM X Series: Different Breed: Michael Coyne x X-Pro3

Fujinon lenses used by Megan Lewis and Michael Coyne in these videos

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • FUJIFILM X-Pro3 Mirrorless Digital Camera B&H
  • FUJIFILM XF 10-24mm f/4 R OIS LensB&H – used by Megan Lewis
  • FUJIFILM XF 16mm f/2.8 R WR LensB&H – used by Michael Coyne

Fujifilm X-Pro3 First Look Touch & Try Event, Ted’s World of Imaging, Sydney, Wednesday November 6, 2019

I attended Fujifilm Australia’s First Look Touch & Try event at Ted’s World of Imaging in Sydney on Wednesday, 6th November, 2019, and had a brief opportunity to handle a preproduction version of the Fujifilm X-Pro3 digital rangefinder camera that has already been well-covered in Fujifilm X-Photographer videos and articles, and first-look commentary by a range of online camera pundits. 

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Fujifilm X-Pro 3, partially denuded. Photograph courtesy of Fujifilm.

As the camera is in preproduction at time of writing, the usual request not to shoot or publish photographs made with it applies, so I will not comment on its stills and video capabilities but will attest that the X-Pro3 is an interesting evolution of Fujifilm’s professional rangefinder line.

Fujifilm is marketing the X-Pro3 as a camera for “street photographers” as Panasonic did for its latest rangefinder-style GX series camera, the Lumix DC-GX9, and I am hoping that with its X-Pro series Fujifilm will not be imitating Panasonic’s decision to make its GX series something less than a great camera for photojournalists and documentary photographers.

I dread the day my Lumix DMC-GX8 gives up the ghost given Panasonic so unexpectedly dropped the ball on pro-quality rangefinder-style cameras in favour of DSLR-style cameras like the admittedly otherwise excellent Lumix DC-G9.

The Fujifilm X-Pro3 digital rangefinder-style camera

Photographs courtesy of Fujifilm.

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First rangefinder camera I ever used, as an art student. Linhof Master Technika 4″x5″ view camera can be used with a range of roll film, sheet film and digital backs. Photograph courtesy of Linhof.

Throughout my career I have relied on a range of camera styles and formats – rangefinders, rangefinder-style cameras, hand and stand sheet film cameras,  SLRs aka Single Lens Reflexes in 120 and 135  film formats, and a DSLR upon Canon’s accidental revolution in the form of the Canon EOS 5D Mark II.

My first choice for immersive documentary photography has always been rangefinder cameras and I have been hoping the X-Pro3 would receive many of the advances found in the X-H1 and X-T3.

Until I have a proper hands-on with it, I will not know whether that is truly the case, but the X-Pro3’s loss of the ability to use its otherwise improved optical viewfinder aka OVF with the Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0 R moderate wide-angle prime lens is a concern.

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Leica Elmarit-M 28mm f/2.8 manual prime lens for Leica M-Series. This was my automatic go-to lens for documentary photography and photojournalism. Photograph courtesy of Japan Camera Hunter.

For many documentary photographers and photojournalists, as it has long been for me, the 28mm focal length (on 35mm sensor cameras) is our default and its 18mm APS-C equivalent works well on the X-Pro2 and especially in its OVF.

Since 2015 I have been daydreaming of a radically improved X-Pro3 being released alongside an even more radically upgraded Fujinon XF 18mm lens with both aimed at documentary photographers and photojournalists, but Fujifilm seems to have decided on setting its sights lower than that, upon street photographers whom I humbly suggest might be better served by the forthcoming X100V.

Time will tell where Fujifilm is heading with its cameras, but I hope that it will not forget its documentary and photojournalism customers as Panasonic appears to have done.

Both companies employed celebrated photojournalists to publicize previous versions of their rangefinder and rangefinder-style cameras but dropped them in favour of street photographers in their latest versions.

What the… ?

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Warrewyk Williams of Fujifilm Australia presenting the Fujifilm X-Pro3 digital rangefinder camera at Fujifilm X-Pro3 FIRST LOOK + Touch & Try event at Ted’s World of Imaging in Sydney on Wednesday November 6, 2019. Photographs by Karin Gottschalk.
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Warrewyk Williams of Fujifilm Australia presenting on the Fujifilm X-Pro3 digital rangefinder camera.
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Fujifilm X-Pro3 pre-production model with pre-production Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens.
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Fujifilm X-T30 dwarfed by the Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR standard zoom lens.
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Fujifilm X-Pro3 pre-production model with limited edition silver grey Fujinon XF 23mm f/2.0 R WR prime lens.
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Handing over the Fujifilm X-Pro3 pre-production model with limited edition silver grey Fujinon XF 23mm f/2.0 R WR prime lens.
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Fujifilm’s smaller, more affordable “Fujicron” lenses are particularly suitable for the X-Pr03 and its processor the X-Pro2, given how the front elements of the larger, costlier “Fujilux” lenses protrude into the lower right of both cameras’ optical viewfinders.
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I have yet to have the pleasure of trying out the Fujifilm GFX-100 medium format camera but it appears particularly suited to the style of portrait photography I used to carry out with 120 roll film and sheet film cameras during the analog era.
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The X-Pro3 finds its way into some female hands.
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Ditto, though with the oversight of a gentleman’s innate expertise.

Fujifilm X-Pro3 Articles, Videos and Reviews By and About Fujifilm Brand Ambassadors, Staff Members and Others, Including Two Female X-Photographers!

Videos by and about camera brand ambassadors as well as product reviews by them, more properly referred to as articles given their often fiscal relationship with those brands, can be often frustrating affairs when needing to know how well the cameras and lenses in question perform in the field in the hands of users not unlike me. 

That is, self-funded independent documentary photographers and videographers.

I would love it if camera and lens makers made early efforts to get their gear to people like me for use in real assignments so we can hear how well or not it performs in the often demanding conditions in which we work.

The too-often generic overviews of just-released new gear by brand ambassadors and professional YouTube reviewers have their uses in painting broad-brush pictures, but they need to be rapidly followed by in-depth insights into performance in the field during real projects and for use in a range of specific moviemaking and photographic genres.

In my humble opinion.

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Fujifilm X-Pro 3 in Dura Black finish with MHG-XPRO3 grip and Fujinon XF 35mm f/2.0 R WR prime lens. I am a fan of hand grips and vertical battery grips for cameras, especially when shooting documentary stills and video or portraits in available light and especially when shooting in available darkness, for better grip and stability handheld. I always default to all-black cameras when I can to maintain some degree of stealth and so am in two minds about the “black” and “silver” DuraTect finishes on the two Dura versions of the X-Pro2. Should X-Pro3 purchasers trade stealth for durability? Is Dura Black as recessive as plain old black paint and thus less noticeable than Dura Silver?

Fujifilm has, in its marketing material, pitched the X-Pro3 at street photographers and photojournalists, and given photographing in the street is a form of documentary, one I prefer to know by the name of urban documentary, and the X-Pro3’s rangefinder form factor is just as appropriate to portraiture, event photography, other forms of documentary, fine art photography, travel photography and more genres besides given this camera has apparently radically improved on its predecessor’s optical viewfinder and electronic viewfinder.

When I wrote about the X-Pro2, I saw it as three cameras in one – a Leica or Contax-style OVF camera, an EVF camera like my Panasonics and a miniature view camera thanks to its excellent fixed LCD monitor.

Over the years I have relied on my X-Pro2 in all three camera guises, for architectural photography, portrait photography, photojournalism, urban documentary and product shots, just as I did with a range of rangefinder-style cameras in film formats from 35mm through 120 roll film up to 4″x5″ sheet film.

Even, in a pinch, for shooting 4K video in a way not dissimilar to how I used 8mm and Super 8 rangefinder movie cameras during the height of the analog era.

Seeing the world OVF-style is a rather different thing to seeing EVF-style and even DSLR-style when shooting stills and video, I have found, and it is good to get out of one’s comfort zone in a regular basis.

I have yet to study the X-Pro3’s specifications in any depth, and the same applies to the videos and articles I am sharing on this page, but it appears that the X-Pro3’s video capabilities are well beyond that of the X-Pro2 though they do not, of course, match those of the amazing X-T3 and are somewhat in the ball park of the oddly-timed X-H1.

Videos

Four videos featuring two female X-Photographers, one female retail store staff member and one unnamed female photographer against the usual slew of male photographers and professional reviewers. Surely camera makers can do better than this in this day and age?

  • AdoramaFujifilm X PRO3 | Hands On with Daniel Norton – “… X-Pro3 is a true photographer’s tool that combines all the feeling of film with all the quality of digital.”
  • bigheadtacoFirst Look: The Titanium Clad Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “Warning: This is a long and nerdy video. If you want a shorter version, check out my shooting impressions video (link down below). Come back here if you want more details”
  • bigheadtacoFirst Shooting Impressions: Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “… I enjoyed using the unique articulating screen, the HVF is improved, and the updated firmware using the X Processor IV is impressive. “
  • Charlene WinfredX Pro3, A Different Breed – “Filmed o[n] the Fujifilm X-T3 and Fujinon XF 18-135mm F3.5-5.6”
  • DPReviewDPReview TV: Fujifilm X-Pro3 Preview – Carbon Coated Classic or Titanium Trinket? – “Some might argue that Fujifilm’s new X-Pro3 rangefinder-style camera takes a page from the Leica playbook, omitting a full-time rear screen in favor of a more ‘pure’ shooting experience. Is the X-Pro3 a carbon-coated classic or a titanium trinket? Chris and Jordan aim to find out.”
  • Fuji Guys ChannelFuji Guys – FUJIFILM X-Pro3 – First Look – “Fuji Guys Francis and Billy give you a first look preview of the FUJIFILM X-Pro3.”
  • FUJIFILM France – Imaging BusinessCyril ABAD X Pro3 – “… Mes attentes en terme de vitesse d’AF, de réactivité, de fluidité de l’EVF sont satisfaites. Le X-Pro3 est plus rapide, plus précis.”
  • FUJIFILM UKLooking back, moving forward. – The New X-Pro3! – “Say hello to the all-new X-Pro3. The exciting newcomer to our X-Pro range has been designed to minimise distractions, keeping you focused on the craft of photography. Watch the video to discover some of its exciting new features.” – depicts an unnamed female photographer.
  • Fujifilm X / GFX España OficialX-Photographer Matías Costa – Fujifilm X-Pro3 – “El #XPhotographer Matías Costa fue seleccionado por FUJIFILM Corporation como uno de los integrantes del selecto grupo de probadores oficiales de la cámara #Fujifilm #XPro3. El resultado de su trabajo es el proyecto “La triple frontera de Gibraltar”. “
  • FUJIFILM X SeriesDifferent Breed: Alberto Selvestrel x X-Pro3 – “Italian photographer Alberto Selvestrel shoots on FUJIFILM X-Pro3.”
  • FUJIFILM X SeriesDifferent Breed: Eric Bouvet x X-Pro3 – “French X-Photographer Eric Bouvet shoots on FUJIFILM X-Pro3.”
  • FUJIFILM X SeriesDifferent Breed: Patrick La Roque x X-Pro3 – “Canadian X-Photographer Patrick La Roque shoots on FUJIFILM X-Pro3.”
  • FUJIFILM X SeriesDifferent Breed: Tomasz Lazar x X-Pro3 – “Polish X-Photographer Tomasz Lazar shoots on X-Pro3”
  • FUJIFILM X Series“FUJIFILM X-Pro3 “Create within Chaos” / FUJIFILM” – “Create within Chaos” X-Pro3″
  • Fujifilm X SingaporeFujifilm Singapore x Mindy Tan: Episode 1- Fuji Girl Series (X-PRO3)“Using the Fujifilm X-Pro3, how can we photograph strangers? What motivates this documentary photographer? Learn from Mindy Tan, a Fujifilm X-photographer.”
  • Gerald UndoneFUJIFILM X-Pro3: 7 Things to Love About This Camera
  • Gordon LaingFujifilm X-Pro 3 preview: HANDS-ON first looks – “Hands-on first-looks preview of the Fujifilm X-Pro 3 camera! CORRECTION: Sorry, no 10 bit video, it’s 8-bit only, but the USB C can be used for headphones.”
  • Kai WFujifilm X-Pro 3 Hands on First Impressions – “What the flip?!”
  • Kevin MullinsFujifilm X-Pro 3 Review and Feature Overview – “… It’s a camera that may divide opinion, but if you are looking for a camera that will last forever, is amazingly quick, tactile and, in my opinion, the best Fujifilm camera fro Street Photography and Reportage work – this is the camera for you….”
  • Lee ZavitzFujifilm X-Pro3 – Hands On Review – “So I was able to test out the new Fuji X-Pro3 for a week now and I made sure to shoot with it a lot! So much that I feel like it’s safe to call this a review. How do you feel about the hidden screen / Sub display? Love it or No?”
  • Matt BrandonFujifilm X-Pro3 – Review – “Just days before the official release of the new Fujifilm X-Pro3, I managed to get my Friends at Fujifilm Malaysia to send me a sample camera. It was a preproduction. I say this because it had some very beta firmware in it, making it impossible to test out many of the new features. But the real buzz about this camera isn’t the latest software or new features like HDR and even the new film simulation, it is about the new design of the camera. The new LDC display or lack of it – so to speak. It features a controversial hidden display. In this video, only hours after I received the camera, I took it for a spin. Special thanks for Fujifilm Malaysia for the loan of the camera.”
  • Matti HaapojaFUJIFILM X-Pro 3 REVIEW – Film Look Straight In Camera?
  • The Art of PhotographyHANDS ON with the Fujifilm X-Pro 3!! – “It doesn’t have all the video options that the X-T3 does, but this camera is designed for still shooters. Having said that you still get 4k video and 8 bit log. I filmed all of the b-roll footage of the actual camera with an X-Pro 3.”
  • Theoria ApophasisX-PRO3 CLOSE LOOK & UNIQUE DETAILS!
  • Wex Photo Video –Fujifilm X-Pro3: Vintage Meets Tech | Real-world Test“… in this video Amy gets her hands on the new Fujifilm X-Pro3, along with several fast prime lenses.”

Articles, Reviews and Other Links

Two articles with more to come by Fujifilm Nordic X-Photographer Charlene Winfred, who is featured in the video at the top of this page.

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • FUJIFILM X-Pro3 Mirrorless Digital Camera B&H
  • Fujifilm XF LensesB&H

Three Blind Men and An Elephant Productions: FujiFilm X-Pro3: Dangerous!

“A modest dissertation on the X-Pro3 development announcement, clickbait and the diminution of language.”

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Image of pre-production Fujifilm X-Pro3 from video of Fujifilm X Summit Shibuya 2019 on September 20, 2019.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • Fujifilm Cameras B&H
  • Fujifilm LensesB&H

bigheadtaco: First Look: Fujifilm XF16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR

“It’s been a while since Fujifilm released a wide to medium range zoom lens, especially with both OIS and WR. Previously, the only general range zoom lens that had both features was the big and bulky XF18-135mm lens. My hope was that Fujifilm would re-make the XF18-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS lens to be XF16-55mm f/2.8-4 R LM OIS WR. Instead, Fujifilm decided to keep the original kit lens and create the new XF 16-80mm f/4 R OIS WR. Who is this lens for? It really depends. If you own the X-T3 and you really want a mid-range zoom lens with both OIS and WR, this is the only option you have. However, if you own the X-H1, would you be better off with the XF 16-55mm f/2.8 and put up with the size and weight of a professional lens? “

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Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR zoom lens.

Commentary

Good to see that photographers are receiving pre-production copies of Fujifilm’s Fujinon XF 16-80mm f/4.0 R OIS WR and, as usual, even more reviews will be appearing when production versions of the lens make their way into the world.

When I was photographing the climate strike rally in Sydney on September 20, I found myself wondering how the 16-80mm f/4.0 zoom lens might change and even improve the way I cover such subjects.

See my personal Instagram account for documentary photographs of the rally and other events, recently mostly using prime lenses on Fujifilm cameras as Panasonic Lumix camera and lens loaners have been in short supply.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • Fujifilm Cameras B&H
  • Fujifilm LensesB&H