Photoism by Mastin Labs: Which Film or Preset Should I Use? A Guide by Mastin Labs.

https://www.mastinlabs.com/photoism/articles/which-film-or-preset-should-i-use-a-guide-by-mastin-labs

Mastin Labs’ Kodak Everyday Original is now available for Capture One Pro. Will Mastin Labs’ other film simulation preset packs also be migrated over to Capture One Pro, one of the most popular top-quality raw image processing applications?

“Film is a 127-year-old medium with many contributors throughout its history. Unlike digital capture, film stocks were not made to accurately reflect reality, but to offer different aesthetic choices to the photographer.

Factors such as the culture where the film company was located and who was available at the time as test subjects greatly determined the characteristics of each film stock. This is one of the reasons that Kodak films render colors differently compared to Fuji films (for example.)…

PLEASE NOTE: Any film can technically be used for any subject or lighting condition, but if you pair the right film with the right subject, you’ll get ideal results….”

Commentary

I follow either of two essentially different paths when processing my raw stills photography files, based on available time and emotional effect.

If time is of the essence and I must quickly process a collection of selects from a project, in effect a set of proofs ready for client viewing or social media, then I always choose to apply film simulation aka emulation presets through software like DxO PhotoLab and its siblings DxO FilmPack and DxO ViewPoint, Alien Skin Exposure X4, Capture One Pro equipped with film styles from 1style.pro, or several other such options including film emulation look-up tables aka LUTs.

My choice of host application and film emulations depends on what films are available which combination and it can vary a great deal.

If there is plenty of time for slower, more thoughtful processing and experimentation with a range of possible looks, then I will spend some time in products like Skylum’s Luminar and Aurora Pro exploring their many highly original, unconventional filters and controls to follow in entirely new image processing directions.

Most of the time, though, time is of the essence and I would rather be creating new images rather than editing older ones.

Capture One Pro is one of the two raw processing applications I am most likely to turn to when time is limited, beside DxO PhotoLab and its plug-ins, and it is good to see film simulation presets specialist Mastin Labs supporting it now.

Kirk Mastin’s presets are rather pricey compared to others, but I have read nothing but praise for them from photographers working digitally as well as in analog photography.

I have yet to try Mastin Labs’ first collection for Capture One Pro, Kodak Everyday Original consisting of presets based on Kodak Ektar 100, Kodak Gold 200 and Kodak Tri-X 400 as well as tone profiles, custom white balance settings, and 35mm and 120 roll film grain simulations.

The analog films upon which this set is based are not necessarily my first choice though I shot Tri-X film in 35mm, 120 and sheet film formats for many years during my magazine editorial photography and corporate photography careers.

The Mastin Labs presets I am more likely to want to use these days are included in their other collections – Fujicolor Original, Fujicolor Pushed, Ilford Original, Portra Original and Portra Pushed – so I hope that we will see these collections released for Capture One Pro in future.

Meanwhile, there are other ways of achieving acceptable analog film simulation or something similar in a number of host applications including Capture One Pro itself, and the list of links below points to some of them.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links below and purchasing through them or our affiliate accounts at B&H Photo Video, SmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

  • Phase One Capture One Pro B&H

Paul Leeming’s Leeming LUT One 801 for Panasonic Cameras including Lumix GH5 and GH5S is Available, More Versions to Come

We have been following Australian director/cinematographer Paul Leeming’s progress in creating, refining and updating his Leeming LUT One unified, corrective Look Up Table aka LUT system for popular mirrorless and DSLR hybrid cameras and camcorders ever since we launched the ‘Untitled’ project. 

Leeming LUT One began as an effort to transform the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH4’s ‘Cine-D’ aka Cinelike D video picture profile into the most accurate, most realistic rendering possible and has expanded to encompass a range of cameras including those made by Canon, DJI, GoPro, JVC, Sony and more, with support for the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K and Fujifilm X-T3 and others coming in the near future. 

Mr Leeming continues to refine Leeming LUT One with version 801 for Panasonic being the most accurate yet, setting a new industry benchmark for realistic colour rendering for video footage shot with the Cinelike D, V-LogL and HLG profiles for editing in Rec. 709 movie projects. 

Recently I put Leeming LUT One 801 to the test with Cinelike D footage from my Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 camera, the one that goes with me almost everywhere everyday, and the results were, as usual, impressive.

Better yet, correcting footage with Leeming LUT One then adding film simulation or creative looks LUTs produces rich grading with a lush and easy-to-grade tonal range.

Many independent moviemakers shoot video for the same project on several cameras including within multi-camera interview set-ups, and Leeming LUT One is invaluable in reducing time in the colour grading suite matching footage from all those different cameras, especially when exposed according to the principles of ETTR aka expose-to-the-right.

In all the following examples, I graded quickly and minimally to simulate the look and feel of the subject at the moment I shot it, to be as realistic as video permits.

Skin tones in mixed available light with Leeming LUT One 801 and LookLabs’ Digital Film Stock Fujifilm Eterna 500T

Reds, greens and blue in strong sunlight with Leeming LUT One 801 and Leeming LUT Quickies v8 Basic Balanced v8 Lighter

Greys and greens in weak sunlight on cold, windy day with Leeming LUT One 801 and LookLabs Digital Film Stock Kodak 5218

Links

  • Leeming LUT Pro – “Leeming LUT Pro™ is the world’s first unified, corrective Look Up Table ( LUT ) system for supported cameras, designed to maximise dynamic range, fix skin tones, remove unwanted colour casts and provide an accurate Rec709 starting point for further creative colour grading.”
  • LookLabsDigital Film Stock aka DFS – “DFS instantly gives you the natural look of film and the most flexible set of LUTs on the market. The DFS bundle includes 19 LUTs that perfectly emulate the most popular Kodak and Fuji film stocks. DFS comes in both REC.709 and LOG video formats and all SpeedLooks camera patches work with today’s most popular digital cinema and mirrorless cameras. DFS even makes your Android videos look like film!”

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links below and purchasing through them or our affiliate accounts at B&H Photo Video, SmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

  • Olympus M43 lensesB&H
  • Panasonic Battery Grip for Lumix GH3 and GH4 Digital CamerasB&H
  • Panasonic DMW-BGGH5 Battery GripB&H
  • Panasonic M43 lensesB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital CameraB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5S Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital CameraB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera with 12-60mm LensB&H
  • Panasonic V-Log L Function Activation Code for DMC-GH4, DC-GH5, and DMC-FZ2500B&H

Fujifilm Global: New firmware updates for FUJIFILM X-Pro2, X-T2 X100F, X-T20 coming soon

http://www.fujifilm.com/news/n170907_06.html

“Free upgrades will provide support for “FUJIFILM X RAW STUDIO”, improve studio flash controller usability compatibility, introduce new AF tracking algorithm and include other functional and operational updates for the ever evolving X Series mirrorless camera range.

FUJIFILM Corporation (President: Kenji Sukeno) will release free firmware updates for the FUJIFILM X-Pro2 (“X-Pro2”), FUJIFILM X-T2 (“X-T2”), FUJIFILM X100F (“X100F”) and FUJIFILM X-T20 (“X-T20”) X Series mirrorless digital cameras. These updates will be released in November and December 2017 and are a result of requests for improving usability and adding new functions.

Installing these firmware updates will add new support for the “FUJIFILM X RAW STUDIO” software which allows the user to connect the camera to a computer via USB cable for developing raw files in camera (X-Pro2, X-T2, X100F). The new firmware will improve third party studio flash controller usability (X-Pro2, X-T2, X100F) and will dramatically improve the AF-C tracking algorithm in zone and tracking AF mode (X-Pro2, X-T2), add 4K video support, computer tethering function (X-Pro2) and enhance the touch panel operation when using the EVF (X-T20).

Firmware Version -due late November : X-T2, X-T20
Firmware Version -due late December : X-Pro2, X100F…

 

Jiří Růžek: Fujifilm X-E3 – EASE – EMOTION – EXPERIENCE – Jiri Ruzek

“A brand new Fujifilm X-E3 camera has been introduced by Fujifilm today….”

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on these affiliate links helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled: Stories of Creativity, Innovation, Success’.

  • Fujifilm X-E3 Mirrorless Digital Camera (Body Only)B&H
  • Fujifilm X-E3 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 23mm f/2 LensB&H
  • Fujifilm X-E3 Mirrorless Digital Camera with 18-55mm LensB&H

Apple US Business Store: RED RAVEN Camera Kit + Final Cut Pro X

https://www.apple.com/us_smb_78313/shop/product/HK8Q2ZM/A/red-raven-camera-kit-final-cut-pro-x

“The RED RAVEN Camera Kit gives you all the components you need to begin shooting true professional-quality video. Along with the kit you’ll get Final Cut Pro X*, which allows professional video editors to work quickly and easily with RED RAVEN footage on Mac notebook and desktop systems.

Designed and engineered to meet RED’s exacting standards for superior image quality, the RED RAVEN camera can capture high-resolution motion and stills in 4.5K Full Format at up to 120 frames per second (fps)—or 2K Full Format at up to 240 fps. It also allows you to take advantage of RED’s cinema-grade dynamic range and color science while offering the ability to record in REDCODE RAW (R3D) and Apple ProRes simultaneously.

The kit includes a lens, monitor, handle, batteries, media, and other components from RED and other professional brands, making it a complete solution for content creators. And weighing in at just 3.5 pounds (1.59 kg), RAVEN delivers the ultimate blend of flexibility and performance for any situation….”

LumaForge: LumaForge NAB 2017 Recap Video Playlist

An ‘About Me’ Page Has Been Added Due to Reader Request

Due to ongoing demand from readers, subjects, potential sponsors and others, I have added an About Me page to the About section of Untitled: Stories of Creativity, Innovation, Success.

Click the link below to go there:

Fujifilm Heralds Coming GFX 50S with ‘GFX Challenges’ Video Series, Plus More

Fujifilm announced the development of its new digital medium format GFX system back in September 2016 with the promise that the “Fujifilm GFX 50S  will give professional photographers the most extraordinary image quality in the history of Fujifilm”. 

Time is rushing by and the first quarter of 2017 will soon commence, during when we can expect the release of the Fujifilm GFX 50S camera with 43.8 x 32.9mm 51.4 megapixel non-X-Trans sensor and three lenses initially with three more to came later in the year.

The first three GF lenses are:

composite_63_zoom_120_1920px
From left, not to scale: GF63mmF2.8 R WR, GF32-64mmF4 R LM WR and GF120mmF4 Macro R LM OIS WR.
  • GF63mmF2.8 R WR – standard prime lens equivalent to 50mm in the 35mm format.
  • GF32-64mmF4 R LM WR –  wide-to-standard zoom lens equivalent to 25 to 51mm in 35mm format.
  • GF120mmF4 Macro R LM OIS WR – stabilized mid-telephoto macro prime lens equivalent to 95mm in 35mm format.

The next three GF lenses will be:

composite_23_45_110_1920px
From left, not to scale: GF23mmF4 LM WR, GF45mmF2.8 R WR and GF110mmF2 R LM WR.
  • GF23mmF4 R LM WR – ultra-wide prime lens equivalent to 18mm in 35mm format.
  • GF45mmF2.8 R WR – wide-angle prime lens equivalent to 35mm in 35mm format.
  • GF110mmF2 R LM WR – wide aperture mid-telephoto prime lens equivalent to 87mm in 35mm format.

Bernd Ritschel

Claire Rosen

Gary Heery

Hiroshi Nonami

Itaru Hirama

Ivan Joshua Loh

Jan Gonzales

Jonas Dyhr Rask

Knut Koivisto

Lito Sy

Lucio Romano

Minoru Kobayashi

Natan Sans

Pål Laukli

Per-Anders Jörgensen

Philipp Rathmer

Philippe Marinig

Piet Van den Eynde

Romeo Balancourt

Sangsun Ogh

Satoshi Minakawa

Seiichi Nakmura

Serkan Günes

Shiro Hagihara

Supalerk Narubetkraisee

Victor Liu

Victoria Wright

Wayne Johns

Yinghui Wu

FUJIFILMglobal –Development of Professional-use Mirrorless Camera System “GFX” / FUJIFILM

Fujifilm’s History of Photographic Achievement

Fujifilm has a long history of achievements and innovations in the photographic sphere and especially in medium and large format photography.

Richard Avedon was a devotee of Fujifilm’s large format lenses for his 8″x10″ sheet film cameras and Greg Gorman relied on the Fujifilm GX 680 series as his main studio portrait cameras for some years.

Fujifilm’s dedication to medium format has been evident from its first 120 format camera, the Fujica Six, through the Fujica G690, Fujica GS645 series, the amazing Fuji Panorama G617 Professional, the Fujica GS645 Professional series, the Fujica GA645 Professional and the SLR-style Fujica GX680 series with camera movements and bellows. Other highlights along the way were the Fujica GW690 and related 120 rangefinder models.

I once spotted the great German-Australian photographer Helmut Newton toting a Fujica GS645 Professional on his way to a magazine portrait assignment and fell in love with that camera for the purpose, an unrequited love affair alas, as it was with other Fujica cameras due to them being hard to get outside of Japan.

Then Fujifilm switched over to digital-only camera and lens manufacturing, though I recall seeing a pair of Fujica GF670 series 120 roll film cameras – a folding GF670 with standard lens and a GF670W – at a trade show in Sydney before the Convention and Exhibition Centre was knocked down for redevelopment that has only just been completed.

I hope that the big photography and video production trade shows will be coming back to the new International Convention Centre Sydney in Darling Harbour soon – it has been far too long without them.

Camera and Lens Choices

As a magazine editorial portrait photographer, I relied on medium and large format cameras for the way they caused my subjects to quickly settle down and and start projecting to the reader via the camera and lens. That was very different to how they related to 35mm rangefinder cameras and different again to 35mm SLR cameras the few times I used them on assignment.

Just before stepping out of professional photography for a time due to extreme photochemical allergies, I had planned on rationalizing my gear with Fujica 6×4.5cm 120 roll film cameras and the GX680. A GX680 III might have been a good choice with which to enter the digital age as Fuji later introduced a digital back, the DBP for GX680, though that was reportedly only available in Japan.

The GX680 series was celebrated for its big range of top notch lenses, 17 in all with one of them a zoom lens, as well as an even larger range of accessories. Lucky owners reported that their experience of the GX680 was a little like using a small view camera, a little like using a 120 format SLR and a little like using a motor drive SLR.

From what little I have seen of using the GFX 50S, its user experience seems like something of a hybrid too, given its fealty to Fujifilm’s X-Series cameras and lenses and even, perhaps, aspects of the FinePix S5 Pro and its S-Series predecessors. We will learn more soon and I am hoping Fujifilm Australia will host a GFX 50S launch event similar to its X-T2 event earlier this year to enable some hands-on experience.

Back to my editorial portraiture experience. I would often be lucky to get not much more than fifteen minutes to meet, greet, assess, set up, light, shoot then pack up for a typical portrait session. That was a product of expectations created by other magazine and newspaper photographers’ typical modus operandi, and client requirements of three to five such assignments per day.

The challenge was to come up with enduring, insightful portraits of two basic types, a landscape aka horizontal format environmental portrait and an intense vertical format full-face portrait. If time allowed I would grab more candid shots with my Leicas. My clients rarely needed more than those two types of portraits, though, one for the article intro and often full-page and the other in the body of the article.  I like some focal lengths for 1:1, prefer others for 4:3 and 3:2, and others again for 16:9.

I used a medium wide angle lens for the environmental portrait, lens stopped down for detail and camera mounted on a tripod. A medium long telephoto macro lens was perfect for the emotionally-engaging full-face portrait. I usually carried a three-light flash kit but substituted it with a single continuous light when needing to shoot in 35mm only.

Looking at Fujifilm’s 2017 GF-Series lens list, of the three to be released in the first part of the year I would choose the GF 120mm f/4 R LM OIS WR and the GF 32-64mm f/4 R LM WR.

The 120mm’s OIS is a real bonus for handholding close and framing tight under continuous light. The 32-64mm’s wide to standard focal range provides framing choices in tight interiors. I would stop both lenses down to f/5.6 as a matter of course, and more again with the wide end of the zoom lens for even more environmental detail if needed.

Out of the three lenses to be released mid to late 2017, the faster lenses look interesting. But, so much hinges on how the camera handles, what configuration works best for what sorts of subject matter and which genres, whether it will be handheld or tripod-mounted, and whether it will be used in available light, continuous artificial light or flash and even what aspect ratio one is shooting for.

Time will tell. Meanwhile I have fingers crossed that one of the rental studios around here may consider adding a full Fujifilm GFX 50S camera and lens kit to their equipment hire inventory.

Raw Processing and Image Editing

Right now it is impossible to predict if and when software companies making raw processors and raw-savvy image editing software will begin supporting the Fujifilm GFX 50S.

But one thing is almost guaranteed, Fujifilm will be supplying an updated version of its Raw File Convertor aka RFC software “powered by SilkyPix” as soon as the GFX 50S is released and it will be available to download and use for free.

RFC is a special edition version of a product by Ichikawa Soft Laboratory Co. Ltd, made in two regular versions, SilkyPix Developer Studio 7 and Developer Studio Pro 7. Having used neither of these the precise differences between RFC, Studio 7 and Studio Pro 7 are unclear to me but RFC is enough for my purposes given I use other raw processors and image editors as well.

Complaining about RFC is almost a cliché in the online world, and while it is true that its user interface is unlike most others’, it is reliable and powerful.

Due to Fujifilm’s special relationship with Ichikawa Soft Laboratory, RFC will always be updated to handle each new Fujifilm camera’s raw files and it will always have Fujifilm’s proprietary raw demosaicing algorithms built in.

Adam Bonn has published an excellent multi-part series of articles on how to get the best out of Raw File Convertor, starting at How to Use the Fujifilm RFC Raw Convertor: Part One.

Where are the Fujifilm-Using Girls?

So far the ‘GFX Challenges’ series numbers sixteen videos and I hope that more are to come, especially some featuring female photographers.

Female professional photographers are just as likely to use medium format digital camera systems as non-female pro photographers, as I can personally attest having been a professional magazine photographer as well as photography client commissioning many of the finest female and non-female photographers in the world to shoot for advertising campaigns and magazines.

Non-Australian female photographers visibly working at the top end of photography had a major effect on my decision to take up professional photography in an era when women were almost completely unknown as pro photographers here.

It was one of those then incredibly rare Australian female professionals who recruited me as a teenager into working for a wedding and portrait studio, using big, heavy, clunky analog medium format cameras and big flash units, and it was another Australian female photographer who showed me that the same subject matter could be brilliantly tackled in a different way with 35mm analog rangefinder cameras.

I owe both those Australians a debt I can never repay, and I owe the same to the great female photographers around the world who inspired me, with whom I have worked, commissioned, produced or about whom I have written.

I hope that, some day very soon, all camera and photography hardware and software companies will recognize the crucial contribution female photographers have made and continue to make to the art and craft of photography by adding equal numbers of women to their professional and ambassadorial ranks.

I cannot help but note that Fujifilm, for example, currently includes only one female photographer in its 18-strong Australian X-Photographers line-up. Surely there is more than one qualified Australian woman using Fujifilm cameras?

Postscript:

As of January 26, 2017, Fujifilm has released 30 GFX Challenges videos via its FUJIFILMGlobal YouTube channel, 28 of which feature male photographers and 2 of which feature female photographers.

Billy Luong, manager for Fujifilm’s Technical Marketing and Product Specialist Group, shared that: “With the GFX we had something like 50 photographers around the world using pre-production cameras.”

Does this mean that there may be more than 2 female photographers in that group?

The issue of the low inclusion and poor representation of women in the creative industries is a crucial and ongoing one. As the Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media‘s excellent motto goes:

If she can see it, she can be it.

Female photographers need vastly improved inclusion and representation in photography and video industry marketing efforts. A male to female ratio of 14:1 in this instance must be improved upon.

Consider the message that such a low female inclusion rate sends.

Further reading:

Image Credits:

Header image by Carmel D. Morris.