DPReview: CP+ 2019 Panasonic interview: ‘We’re proud of our cameraness’

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/0078977575/cp-2019-panasonic-interview-we-re-proud-of-our-cameraness

“The CP+ 2019 trade show in Yokohama, Japan, gave us the chance to speak to most of the major camera makers. Panasonic put forward an extensive team to discuss the company’s move into the full-frame market….

… it’s clear that Panasonic wants its S1 and S1R to appeal specifically to professional stills photographers. When it comes to video, the company’s plans seem less well-developed. For now, at least, it seems that Panasonic sees the GH series as its main video/stills camera platform.”

Commentary

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Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 wide angle zoom lens for Micro Four Thirds cameras. This is the very first zoom lens by any maker that provides the most necessary focal lengths for documentary photography and video, and it doubtless will feel right at home on a Lumix GH5, GH5S, G9 and the coming GH6 as well as the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K.

If by “cameraness” Panasonic means that one can pick up a Lumix S1 or S1R, feel at ease with it and start shooting good photographs or movie footage right away, then I agree with the company’s use of that word.

Here is an event where I tried out the S1 and here is the other event where I tried out an S1R, both times shooting decent photographs almost immediately after the most cursory inspection of the cameras’ controls.

Of course, that ease of use is based partly on my years-long familiarity with Panasonic’s Micro Four Thirds Lumix cameras and partly on Panasonic’s even longer history of constantly improving its cameras and lenses all by itself and in collaboration with Leica Camera AG.

Cameras and lenses by both companies share DNA and it was inevitable, in retrospect, that their long partnership would deepen into the L-Mount Alliance, pleasantly drawing lens maker Sigma in to the equation along with its wide range of top-class prime and zoom lenses for cinematography and photography.

When Panasonic staff members asked me for my first impressions of the S1 and S1R at a couple of touch-and-try events in Sydney earlier this year, my first thought was that both would be very usable cameras if I were still working in magazine editorial portrait and documentary photography where 35mm sensors are king.

That is no mean achievement for the first version of any new product range, and I look forward to seeing how Panasonic’s current S-Series cameras and their successors develop.

If I need to get back into 35mm sensor photography and video, I know where to go.

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DxOMark: Panasonic Lumix DC-S1R sensor review

https://www.dxomark.com/panasonic-lumix-s1r-sensor-review/

Panasonic has chosen a new high-resolution 47.3MP CMOS sensor for the Lumix DC-S1R—one that challenges the class-leading sensors in the Sony A7R III and the Nikon Z 7. Intriguingly, it combines attributes of both of its rivals (with some nuances) and achieves near-identical performance results overall.

With its combination of high pixel count, low noise, and exceptional color sensitivity, the Lumix DC-S1R is likely to appeal to the most demanding studio photographers….

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Panasonic Lumix DC-S1R with Panasonic Lumix S 24-105mm f/4.0 zoom lens.

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David Thorpe: Panasonic’s Lumix S1 and G9 Digital Double Act

“The S1 and the G9 Panasonics are a truly unique digital double act. How do the Full Frame S1 and Micro Four Thirds G9 stand up against one another? Is bigger better? Or is nimbler nicer?”

Commentary

Top video reviewer David Thorpe always cuts to the heart of the matter when it comes to mirrorless digital cameras and lenses, a trait no doubt formed by decades in the trenches as a Fleet Street photographer.

In this video review comparing Panasonic’s Lumix DC-G9 Micro Four Thirds mirrorless camera with the recently-released Lumix DC-S1 35mm sensor mirrorless camera, Mr Thorpe opts to continue daily carrying his G9 but appreciates the differences and similarities in both.

Links

  • David ThorpeJohnny and Max – review
  • David Thorpe – Panasonic’s Lumix S1 and G9 Digital Double Act – video
  • ePHOTOzine – Panasonic Lumix S1 Full-Frame Camera Review By David Thorpe – video with gallery of sample photographs

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Panasonic: Lumix AF Guidebook [PDF guidebooks for Lumix S1/S1R and GH5/GH5S/G9 cameras on getting the best out of autofocus]

https://www.panasonic.com/global/consumer/lumix/technologies/af.html

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Panasonic Lumix DC-S1 with Panasonic DMW-BGS1 Vertical Battery Grip and  Panasonic Lumix S 24-105mm f/4 Macro OIS lens.

LUMIX uses advanced technology to achieve high-speed, high-precision auto focusing. This guidebook allows you to utilize this auto focusing effectively at a higher level….

The LUMIX features an AF Custom Setting function that lets you finely adjust the directivity of the AF in response to the subject and situation. Here, we present the recommended settings and hints when making the setting….

External levers, buttons, and a Joystick Controller enable intuitive operation while using the finder. Users who are familiar with touch operation can seamlessly change the size of the AF area and shoot the subject by simply pressing the shutter of the touch monitor. Here we present more convenient auto focus settings designed for maximum operating ease….

Introducing original Panasonic technology for achieving high-speed, high-precision auto focusing….

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Lumix G9 Pro, Lumix GH5 and Lumix GH5S at Pa`nasonic Japan’s website. Where is the professional successor to the pro flagship rangefinder-stye GX8?

Commentary

With a number of pundits asking whether Panasonic has got it right yet with the company’s unique approach to autofocusing, it is timely to look deeper into the autofocus capabilities of Panasonic’s new S-Series 35mm sensor Lumix cameras and its established Micro Four Thirds sensor-equipped Lumix GH5, GH5S and G9 cameras.

It is reasonable to assume that Panasonic is currently working on its M43 cameras’ successors, and I would love to see the company produce a GH6 that combines the best of all three of them for stills photography and video, with the very best autofocusing that technology can offer.

Although I would love it if all manufacturers made lenses equally adept for use with manual focusing and autofocusing, equipped with the hard stops and manual clutch focus that have proven so effective on some Fujifilm X-mount and Olympus M.Zuiko Pro lenses, the fact is that autofocus will always play a part in using almost all lenses made nowadays.

Even back button focus in manual mode relies on good autofocusing capabilities on the cameras on which it features, so their autofocus needs to be the best possible.

If autofocus on Panasonic’s current camera generation remains lacking then best to study how it can be tailored to obtain result close to what you need rather than waiting for DSLR-quality autofocus in a future generation.

I was impressed by the Human Body Detection and Face/Eye Detection features of the Lumix S1 and S1R when I briefly tried them out at two public events in Sydney, so I hope that Panasonic will continue to improve the cameras’ autofocus via firmware updates, and radically improve autofocus in it coming generations to the point where it matches if not surpasses that of the best current DSLRs.

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PhotoJoseph: LUMIX S1 & S1R Battery Grip BGS1

“The LUMIX S Series S1 and S1R have an optional battery grip, the BGS1. This is a tour and explanation of how to use it and what it can do!…”

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Panasonic Lumix DC-S1 with Panasonic DMW-BGS1 Vertical Battery Grip and Panasonic Lumix S 24-105mm f/4 Macro OIS lens.

Panasonic accessories for Panasonic Lumix S-Series cameras

Commentary

Panasonic’s accessories for its new S-Series 35mm sensor cameras received little attention during the two public launch events I attended earlier this year, yet they and especially the DMW-BGS1 Vertical Battery Grip displayed the same carefully attention to detail and keen listening to professional users’ lengthy lists of features requests as the Panasonic Lumix DC-S1 and DC-S1R cameras themselves.

Since buying into Panasonic’s Micro Four Thirds system with the Lumix with the Lumix DMC-GH4 some years ago, I have considered vertical battery grips essential items to be bought with any new camera, if the manufacturer has thought to provide one, and this applies to the DMW-BGS1 Vertical Battery Grip as well as several other S-Series accessories.

I am especially impressed by the fact that Panasonic has included the Panasonic DMW-EC6 Eyecup in the list of accessories for the S1 and S1R.

I have had to rely on third-party rubber eyecups made by JJC and Guerrilla for Fujifilm X and Panasonic G cameras, except for my Lumix GX8 where an optional long eyecup was made available by Panasonic, due to wearing eyeglasses and needing to block out laser beam sunlight or harsh indoor lighting.

Both these accessories will come in handy when using both cameras for video, portrait and documentary photography.

I had a chance to try out the vertical battery grip on a Lumix S1R with 50mm f/1.4 lens and it made the camera much easier to use when shooting vertical/portrait orientation with the camera’s very welcome 3:4 aspect ratio, perfectly matched to the average single magazine page.

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DPReview TV: Panasonic S1 Review

“How does the new Panasonic S1 stand up to its mirrorless competition? Does ‘animal-AF’ work on dinosaurs? Will Jordan curl up on the ground in the name of art? We answer the tough questions. Shot entirely on the Panasonic S1 in the Canadian Badlands….”

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Panasonic Lumix DC-S1 35mm sensor mirrorless camera with Panasonic Lumix S 24-105mm f/4 Macro OIS standard zoom lens.

Commentary

DPReview’s Calgary-based DPReview TV team has created one of its signature video reviews of Panasonic’s Lumix DC-S1 35mm sensor mirrorless camera equipped with the Panasonic Lumix S 24-105mm f/4 Macro OIS standard zoom lens, and I am hoping they will soon be following up with a similar review of the Lumix DC-S1R.

My own first impressions of both cameras and two of their native Lumix lenses garnered during a couple of public launch events in Sydney are that both are serious competitors to recent 35mm mirrorless releases and appear designed and manufactured well enough to make a dent in the field where I most relied upon 35mm format cameras in the past – magazine editorial photography and newspaper photojournalism.

Provided, that is, Panasonic does something to improve both cameras’ autofocus capabilities and replaces their Fujifilm-style three-way tilting LCD monitors with the fully-articulated monitors that work so well on Panasonic’s professional-quality GH5, GH5S, G9 and GX8 Micro Four Thirds mirrorless cameras.

I suspect that we may only see that occurring on next generation Panasonic Lumix S Series cameras given both problems are hardware-based, but we can hold out hope that a possible future S1 and S1R firmware update will see radical autofocus improvements.

Meanwhile I hope to dig deeper soon into both cameras’ feature sets and suitability for stills photography and video, with a special personal interest in the S1R for large-enlargement exhibition prints and emotionally-intense portrait photography.

Two big points in the S1 and S1R’s favour for both applications – Panasonic’s vertical battery grip and optional video-style rubber eyecup, both accessories having proven themselves necessities on other camera systems, with vertical battery grips being essential for best grip when shooting portraits in vertical aka portrait orientation.

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Panasonic UK Lumix Ambassador Nick Driftwood Shares His Lumix S1 Custom Modes Settings File for Video

UK Panasonic Lumix ambassador and longtime video innovator Nick Driftwood is kindly sharing his custom settings file for shooting NTSC and Pal video with the newly-released Panasonic Lumix DC-S1 35mm sensor format hybrid stills and video camera. 

Creating settings like these can be a painstaking enough business with Panasonic’s Micro Four Thirds cameras and even more so with the Lumix S1 given it offers a total of thirteen, yes thirteen, custom settings slots as opposed to the five of its smaller-sensor siblings. 

Mr Driftwood has my gratitude for creating this settings file and even more so for making it available for free instead of a fee, at his Nick Driftwood’s Filmmaker Emporium

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Panasonic Lumix DC-S1R with Panasonic Lumix S 24-105mm f/4.0 zoom lens.

As I discovered last week, the Lumix S1 and S1R are great cameras for stills photography though I have yet to try them out for video.

Mr Driftwood confirms my observation about the S1’s photography capabilities, and he has more to say about it as a video camera:

This is a great camera for photographers with its 24MP FF sensor offering really good low light performance – its very clean even at 10000 ISO!

But it also translates over to decent looking video with its 4K 24p, 25p, 30p, 50p, 60p performance. Then there’s also the brilliant 4K/6KPhoto mode that can shoot 60fps in 4K/ 30fps in near 6K (for example 4:3 aspect mode is 4992×3744 pixels).

Switching around manually all these settings can be tiresome, so, I wanted to invite users to take a look at the custom mode features where you can set and store all your favourite settings and recall them in an instance. It saves so much time being able to load settings all in one go!

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Fujifilm X-Pro2 User Peter Dareth Evans Namechecks Six Photographic Greats with His Seven Excellent JPEG Film Simulation Settings

At the moment I don’t rely on JPEGs from any cameras as my SOOC (straight-out-of-camera) originals for online or print reproduction. Several reasons, prime of which is our lousy national broadband upload speeds and allocations. Then there is the fact that I use and love two different mirrorless camera systems for their different video capabilities and when shooting stills I prefer to edit raw files to colour match projects shot with both. Lastly, I don’t have any clients that demand fast turnaround and online transmission soon after shooting. 

I do, however, like to set custom JPEG and video profiles on each system’s cameras and my preference is looks emulating some of the great analog films of yesteryear. Using as many of them as I could lay hands on, processing and printing my own negatives and transparencies, may have wrecked my health but it exposed me to a vast range of analog tone and colour possibilities that I now apply to visualizing and processing digital images.

Although my workflow does not require film simulation presets when shooting, it is fun to have them in-camera as custom settings. The latest firmware for for Fujifilm’s X-Pro2 and X-T2 permits renaming all seven custom settings. Until Peter Dareth Evans of Pete Takes Pictures shared his custom settings, I had both of Kevin Mullins’ wedding photojournalism customs settings installed but yearned for other looks as well.

Six of the greats plus one

Mr Evans seven custom settings pay homage to some of the greats of photography – William Eggleston, Joel Sternfeld, Mary Ellen Mark, Daido Moriyama, Garry Winogrand and John Bulmer – and one Fujifilm X-Photographer member of the KAGE Collective, Patrick LaRoque.

Those six greats, or at least the photographic schools of thought to which they belong, have been important to my own development as a photographer and moviemaker, so I quickly overwrite my custom settings with them and custom named them according to Mr Evans’ own descriptions.

I am looking forward to putting them to the test with some serious photography soon. Meantime I applied them to some quick and dirty X-Pr02 videos of domestic scenes and was impressed.

The downside of Fujifilm’s implementation of video on the X-Pro2, other than being 1080p only, is that only the film simulation part of the settings apply. Dynamic Range, Grain Effect, Highlight Tone, Shadow Tone, Colour, Noise, Grain, Sharpness settings have no effect on video though they do on JPEGs.

My quick and dirty workaround is to apply a tone recovery LUT from my ever-growing collection of free and paid-for LUTs, in this case FilmContrast_Light.cube from CoreMelt’s LUTx Feature Looks Collection or either of the two recovery LUTs from James Miller’s DeLUTS Fujifilm X-Pro2 LUT set.

Fujifilm, give us exposure zebras on all your cameras PLEASE!

Although Fujifilm continues to improve its cameras’ video capabilities, the company has several blindspots that have me wondering about its commitment to moviemakers using their cameras.

None of Fujifilm’s cameras’ firmware includes exposure zebras, the most essential tool for obtaining correct exposure of video and stills via ETTR – expose to the right. I rely on zebras when shooting video and stills on all my cameras of another mirrorless brand and zebras’ absence from the X-T2 is a major factor in not purchasing one despite its otherwise promising video support.

Crippling the application of custom settings to the X-Pro2’s video capability is deeply disappointing though it did not deter me from purchasing the X-Pro2. I have been yearning for an affordable digital interchangeable lens OVF camera for years now and the X-Pro2 has satisfied that desire for my stills photography work.

Shooting movies with OVF cameras is a passion and pleasure, perhaps peculiar to someone like me who began making short movies with old OVF film cameras. I so wish that the X-Pro2 supported zebras in its EVF, monitor and ERF, and allowed me to fine-tune my custom settings for video in the way that Messers Evans and Mullins do for stills photography.

Credits:

Thanks to Fuji Rumors for sharing This Guy Fine Tuned his Fujifilm Film Simulation Settings Inspired by the Work of Great Film Photographers. See “Chrome Eggleston” & More.

Links:

Phase One Releases Four Custom Capture One Pro Workspaces and Workspace Settings Files

Optimum image processing workflows and workspaces are still something I have to fully work out for all the raw processors and image editing applications I use, and I suspect many other photographers are in the same boat. A similar thing applies to moviemaking with workflows. 

Some current raw processing and image editing software has the ability to choose built-in preset workspaces and a subset of that software allows you to create, save and share your own custom workspace files. A further subset of current applications has this ability coming soon.

Ever curious as to how other photography professionals do it, I always go on over and download custom workspace settings whenever I hear about them.

As soon as I read about the four new Capture One Pro workspaces being shared by in-house photographers at Phase One, I headed off to skim the articles about them, saved them into my Evernote Capture One training notebook, downloaded the custom settings files and placed them in my Capture One Pro workspaces folder.

I have yet to work out my own optimum Capture One Pro workspaces though I have a small set that are about halfway there, adapted from older workspace settings files I found on the Web.

Some day soon, I swear, I will shut all distractions out, boot up Capture One Pro, load up a typical session or catalog, then go to work on creating the best personal custom workspace that I can. Doing that will be a future timesaver even though it will eat up a little time while doing it.

The Capture One Pro Custom Workspace Settings: