Does Camera Accessories Maker JJC Produce a Better Fujifilm X-Pro2 Rubber Eyecup?

I just came across a possible solution to the Fujifilm X-Pro2 camera’s less than perfect rubber eyecup when researching for an article on the coming Fujifilm X-Pro3, and am sharing what I know so far. 

Fujifilm chose a rather minimalist solution for the rubber eyecup on the X-Pro2’s viewfinder eyepiece, one that seems to have forgotten the needs of those of use who must wear eyeglasses, just as they did when designing the X-Pro2’s less than perfect eye relief and viewfinder magnification. 

 I hope that these design solutions will be improved in the coming X-Pro3, but meanwhile I have been searching for ways to improve the experience of using my X-Pro2. 

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JJC EF-XPRO2G silicone rubber replacement eyecup for Fujifilm X-Pro2 cameras. This version is for photographers who wear eyeglasses.

Since getting back into photography and video with recent generations of digital cameras, there is not a single camera that I have used without modifying it in some way in order to improve my experience with it.

I usually do that via camera-maker or third party accessories including hand grips, vertical battery grips, lens hoods, rubber eyecups, terminal covers, camera straps, thumb grips, self-adhesive buttons and sometimes even improvised solutions made with Sugru, “the world’s first mouldable glue”.

Interesting to note that Sugru, once pooh-poohed by the owner of our now tragically defunct local hardware store, now has its imitators with at least three different pseudo-Sugrus turning up on the shelves of an inner-city Bunnings SuperStore last month.

Sadly, DIYing it may not be the best solution for some camera or lens improvements and that is when I go searching the more obscure corners of the non-dark web for readymade alternatives.

Chinese camera and lens accessories maker JJC has improved its design and manufacturing quality since I first purchased some of their products for my Fujifilm Finepix X100 way back when, so much so that I had no hesitation in almost permanently attaching a JJC LH-JXF23 Lens Hood to the Fujinon XF 23mm f/1.4 R prime lens that is almost always attached to my Fujifilm X-Pro2.

So, my first port of call after returning from a documentary photography shoot last weekend was the JJC website as a result of which I ordered two JJC products for the X-Pro2.

They are the JJC EX-XPRO2G and JJC EX-XPRO2 silicone rubber eyecups and I am waiting for their arrival with bated breath

As an eyeglasses wearer with less than perfect vision, I have problems when shooting outdoors in Australia’s laser beam sunlight as well as indoor locations lit by harsh LED downlights.

The X-Pro2’s minimalist rubber eyecup does little to nothing to help block out either forms of hard, bright light, often making it difficult to see well.

JJC’s description of how to attach and detach the two versions of its silicone rubber eyecups for the X-Pro2 pretty much non-existent, and I wish that manufacturers would bother to hire some brilliant technical writers and technical illustrators such as my BFF who worked in those roles for Canon until the company began closing down its global research and development arm.

How any camera and lens maker can continue to effectively innovate and communicate without an R&D department much less tech writers and technical illustrators is beyond me but there is no accounting for corporate male egos I suppose.

I am looking forward to seeing if JJC’s rubber eyecups will do the trick and will be glad to learn how they are to be attached to my X-Pro2’s eyepiece, if the packages contain actual instructions.

Meanwhile I hope that Fujifilm has come up with a better solution for the X-Pro3’s viewfinder, eyepiece and eyecup.

I note that Fujifilm offers five different options for eyecups on its X-T3, X-T3 and X-H1 cameras so hope that they have the same amount of thought into the one, or ones, for the X-Pro3.

I shall add a postscript to this page when I have received both pairs of JJC eyecups.

JJC EF-XPRO2G silicone rubber eyecup for eyeglasses wearers

JJC EF-XPRO2 silicone rubber eyecup for non-eyeglasses wearers

Fujifilm rubber eyecups for Fujifilm X-T3, X-T2 and X-H1 cameras

Guerrilla alternative and Panasonic Lumix replacement rubber eyecups

Postscript

Rubber eyecups are one of the more vulnerable things on digital camera bodies, in my experience, and I have had several of them drop off in the street or into the crevasses of camera bags in the past despite careful treatment when using and carrying my gear.

When that happens the last thing you want to do is frantically search online for replacements that can cost a fortune and take days if not weeks to arrive when shipped from overseas online retailers.

Accordingly I have replacement OEM and alternative third-party rubber eyecups for all my non-Fujifilm cameras, and the lack of either for my Fujifilm cameras gave me extra motivation for researching and ordering JJC’s two silicone rubber eyecups, the JJC EF-XPRO and the JJC EF-XPRO2G.

The JJC EF-XPRO has just arrived and the JJC EF-XPROG may be here in the next couple of days.

My first conclusion is that both JJC rubber eyecups are replacements and not supplements to the one that comes attached to the X-Pro2.

That is a good thing in that if friction or accident causes the camera’s rubber eyecup to come off, as it apparently has for a number of X-Pro2 owners, then it is possible to use the JJC EF-XPRO or JJC EF-XPRO2G as a do-it-yourself replacement.

The downside is that JJC offers no explanation of that or how to do it in their website and there are no instructions or illustrations on the procedure and the tools and possible adhesives needed on the packet.

Oh dear.

I am not a techie by any means so I may need to find someone who is skilled and equipped to do the replacement for me, if I choose to go ahead with it.

I am guessing that involves detaching the currently well-attached eyecup currently on the camera and then glueing the replacement on in its place.

Examination of the JJC EF-XPRO shows it is almost exactly the same size and shape as the eyecup that goes with the X-Pro2.

As an eyeglasses-wearer, I am more likely to seriously consider replacing the camera’s current rubber eyecup with the JJC EF-XPROG, which is 25.4mm wide compared to the JJC EF-XPRO’s 22.8mm width.

I will consider that possibility further when the JJC EF-XPROG arrives.

One thing makes me nervous, though, and that is how much damage might be done to the camera’s viewfinder eyepiece by removing the current rubber eyecup.

I don’t have the required skills, experience, tools and glues to do it myself, so will have to find someone who does, if I decide to go ahead.

Meanwhile…

I have just one across an optional, that is, not a replacement, rubber eyecup for the Fujifilm X-T3 camera that can also be used on the X-T2, X-t1 and GFX 50S cameras.

The JJC EF-XTLIIG appears to go several steps beyond the five optional Fujifilm rubber eyecups that Fujifilm offers for these cameras, and looks particularly well-suited for shooting video with the X-T3.

Once again, detailed use and attachment information about this product is limited and I will need to do more research, especially in regard to using it with eyeglasses.

The X-T3 is a great camera for high-specced HLG and F-Log video as well as portraiture with vertical battery grip and longer lenses such as the Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R, and I have experienced problems with bright light affecting my vision when using it for those purposes.

I have not tried removing an existing rubber eyecup from an X-T3, but review loaner X-T2 cameras came with loose rubber eyecups or in one case no rubber eyecup at all so they may be easily replaced in a way that the one on the X-Pro2 is not.

Once again there appears to be a lack of clarity in the JJC and third party online retailer pages about the JJC EF-XTLIIG rubber eyecup with images of two different eyecups purporting to be the same product, as seen in the last two images above.

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Will’s Vegan Shoes Releases Possibly Perfect On-Location Boots and Shoes for Photographers and Moviemakers

London-based online boot and shoe maker and retailer Will’s Vegan Shoes and Accessories Co. has released candidates for what may be the perfect on-location boots and shoes for photographers and moviemakers, Waterproof Hiking Boots and Waterproof Hiking Shoes, in men’s and women’s version and in a range of sizes. 

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Will’s Vegan Shoes & Accessories Co. has released what may be the perfect work boots and shoes for photographers and moviemakers, in a range of sizes for men and women.

Shoe designer Will Green “started Will’s Vegan Shoes with a passion to provide animal and human friendly shoes with high-street styles and prices. My dream is to bridge the gap between everyday people and ethically produced vegan shoes.”

I have had to pay particular attention to leather products in our home and home studio and offices in recent years, since radical climate change set in and many leather products here began attracting mould for the very first time.

Mould is fatal to cameras, lenses and electronics.

Leather goods, leather trim on camera bags and camera straps, leather boots and shoes and even some synthetic fabrics can become mould breeders almost overnight, and once established mould can spread from item to item and throughout the house.

Black mould has proven to be a particular problem for some Sydney residents of our acquaintance, requiring them to evacuate their flats and the flats themselves to be boarded up, declared uninhabitable.

I have tried removing mould from affected items with anti-mould products of various sorts but mould spores always seem to remain deeply embedded even when the surface appears clean.

As a result we have now embarked on a total leather elimination policy.

A major facet of that is the replacement of leather and leather-trimmed shoes and boots with products made from vegan leather.

We have just placed an order with Will’s Vegan Shoes in order to try out one of Mr Green’s products and test them for size, one of the biggest concerns when buying boots, clothes or shoes online from an unfamiliar supplier.

Links

Paul Leeming of Leeming LUT One Presenting at Getting to Grips with Lenses Event in High Wycombe, Bucks on Saturday 21st April 2018

https://mailchi.mp/9dfd2da97b22/gtc-workshop-getting-to-grips-with-lenses?e=a9ac9ddccc

“This interactive workshop will explore the world of video & motion picture lenses, from the perspective of camera operators, cinematographers and filmmakers. We will look at the current state of the industry, with opportunities to get hands-on with the most popular current zoom and prime lenses. We will also discuss anamorphic lenses, lens adaptors, budget cine zooms, and how continual increases in sensor resolution are affecting the lens market….

… Paul Leeming: DoP In conjunction with Formatt-Hitech, Paul will show how modern filters can work best with the new breeds of zoom and prime lenses….”

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Australian director/cinematographer Paul Leeming of Leeming LUT One fame with his Panasonic Lumix GH4 rigged for shooting feature films.

Links

DPPreview: Panasonic interview: “Our business philosophy is based on ‘changing photography'”

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/7479700625/cp-panasonic-interview

“Recently we visited the 2018 CP+ show in Yokohama, Japan and booked an in-depth interview with Panasonic. Among the topics covered were the company’s new twin flagships, the Lumix GH5S and G9, as well as how Panasonic hopes to grow their appeal to professional and advanced amateur stills photographers….”

Commentary

Panasonic’s Lumix DC-G9 DSLR-style stills-oriented camera and the Lumix DC-GH5S DSLR-style video-oriented are remarkable achievements of which the company can be justly proud, but it is good to read that Panasonic does not intend to rest on its laurels when it comes to new stills photography camera offerings.

… Our business philosophy is based on ‘changing photography.’ And any change we make must be a benefit for the customer, and for the last two or three years, we’ve really focused on our video capabilities. But we still want to satisfy stills-focused users with our philosophy….

I really want to see Panasonic adhere to that philosophy and to change photography as much as it has changed video for independent documentary photographers and videographers like me.

I hope that coming Lumix stills-oriented cameras will not suffer the fate of Panasonic’s professional rangefinder-style flagship Lumix DMC-GX8, which was “replaced” with the non-professional Lumix DC-GX9 aka Lumix GX7 Mark III rangefinder-style aimed at enthusiasts and street photographers.

DSLR-style cameras do not and cannot “replace” rangefinder and rangefinder-style cameras.

I will repeat that.

DSLR-style cameras do not and cannot “replace” rangefinder and rangefinder-style cameras, and so the Lumix DC-G9, no matter how great it may be for sports and wildlife photography, does not and cannot “replace” the Lumix DMC-GX8.

Panasonic, we are waiting to hear that you will be coming up with a professional rangefinder-style successor to the Lumix DMC-GX8.

Meanwhile we are also waiting to hear what you intend to do to come up with successors to two cameras which fill a currently unfulfilled need, that of eminently portable compact rangefinder-style cameras with fixed or interchangeable lenses small enough to carry anytime anywhere in any general-purpose bag or dedicated small camera bags such as the attach-to-anything Think Tank Photo Little Stuffit! V3.0.

Right now there is no successor to either the Lumix DMC-GM5 or the Lumix DMC-LX100 and there needs to be, just as there must be a real successor to the Lumix DMC-GX8.

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think_tank_little_stuffit!_v3.0_01_1024px_60%
Think Tank Photo Little Stuff It! V3.0 can be attached to a belt, bag rail or vertical straps such as Think Tank Photo Pixel Racing Harness V3.0 or straps on other camera bags and backpacks.

Clicking on and purchasing through these affiliate links helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled: Stories of Creativity, Innovation, Success’.

  • Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera (Body Only)B&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital CameraB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5S Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital CameraB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-GX9 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera with 12-60mm LensB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital CameraB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DMC-LX100 Digital CameraB&H
  • Think Tank Photo Little Stuff It! Belt Pouch V3.0B&H

Fuji Rumors: Fujifilm X-H1: Full English Press Release and More Images with MK Lenses

https://www.fujirumors.com/fujifilm-x-h1-full-english-press-release-images-mk-lenses/

“In case you missed it, I have google translated to English the entire press release leaked in German as well as manually translated the full specs sheet (see below). You can also download the specs sheet in English here at my dropbox….”

fujifilm_rumor_x-h1_battery_grip_white_01_1024px_60%
Fujifilm X-H1 with battery grip and Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS kit zoom, image released by Nokishita and republished at Fuji Rumors.

Commentary

fujifilm_rumor_x-h1_fujinon_cine_zoom_square_01_1024px_60%
Fujifilm X-H1 with Fujinon MK 18-55mm T2.9 X-Mount Cinema Zoom

Fuji Rumors has outdone itself on the Fujifilm X-H1 with heavily detailed specifications lists, press releases, images and size comparisons between the X-H1 and other hybrid stills/video cameras whether mirrorless or DSLR, in advance of Fujifilm’s official X-H1 product announcement on February 15.

That announcement will no doubt also include the X-Mount versions of Fujifilm’s MK Series 18-55mm T2.9 and 50-135mm T2.9 cinema zoom lenses, previously released in E-Mount versions for Sony cinema and Sony Alpha hybrid cameras in the α7 and α9 series.

I will be publishing official product photographs, specifications, and links to articles and videos by moviemakers and photographers who have been working with pre-production versions of the Fujifilm X-H1 and X-Mount versions of the Fujinon MK Series zoom lenses after Fujifilm’s announcement on the 15th and no doubt that article will be a lengthy one.

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Samsung NX1 with Samsung Premium S 50-150mm f/2.8 ED OIS zoom lens, still the benchmark for up-to-date Super 35mm hybrid video cameras, though it missed out on a fully-articulated monitor and 10-bit 4:2:2.

With the leaks by DigiCame-Info, Fuji Rumors and Nokishita, there has been much discussion and speculation at online moviemaking fora, much of it comparing the X-H1’s video specifications to Panasonic’s Lumix DC-GH5 and DC-GH5S Super 16/Micro Four Thirds cameras, and Samsung’s discontinued but still revolutionary Super 35/APS-C NX1.

All three cameras raised the bar for mirrorless video very high indeed.

This is the set of video-centric features I have been hoping to see appear in the X-H1:

  • 4K UHD and 4K DCI 200 Mbit
  • 4K 60p
  • 5-axis in-body image stabilization (IBIS) that works in conjunction with optical image stabilization (OIS)
  • 10-bit 4:2:2
  • Battery grip with full controls for vertical/portrait orientation
  • Decent battery sizes
  • Decent body grip
  • Decent set of of well-spaced colour-matched native X-Mount prime and zoom lenses with manual clutch focus or at least linear focus-by-wire
  • Dual memory card slots
  • Exposure zebras with ability to set percentages/IRE levels
  • External recording via HDMI 2.0+
  • Full 10-bit internal F-Log
  • Fully-articulated monitor
  • Fully-customizable picture profiles
  • In-body audio-monitoring aka headphone port
  • Unlimited recording duration
  • Viable eye and face autofocus
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Is this the camera that inspired Fujifilm’s X-H1 designers? The Contax N1 autofocus analog SLR, last in a long line of Kyocera-made Contax cameras licensing the Contax brand from Zeiss, released in 2000. Kyocera also made Yashica brand cameras.

How many of these boxes, as it were, will the DSLR-style Fujifilm X-H1 tick and how much will any non-inclusion of essential features mitigate against the X-H1 in being a viable, up-to-date video camera for the sorts of productions that warrant Super 35 image quality?

Or, will that good old Australian saying, “close enough is good enough”, be applicable enough in the case of the Fujifilm X-H1?

Links

ePHOTOzine: Panasonic Lumix G9 Expert Review

https://www.ephotozine.com/article/panasonic-lumix-g9-expert-review-31614

“Panasonic Lumix G9 Expert Review – We review the new Panasonic Lumix G9, Panasonic flagship 20mp Micro Four Thirds camera with interchangeable lenses, high-speed shooting, and 80mp high-resolution mode….”

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  • Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 Mirrorless Micro Four Thirds Digital Camera (Body Only)B&H

Panasonic Australia: Snap up A Summer Bonus Summer Promotion

http://promotion.panasonic.com.au/snapupsummer/

“Purchase a participating product from the Lumix G Series, Lumix Lenses, Compact or Panasonic Video Camera range from a participating retailer between 13 November 2017 and close of business on 14 January 2018. Please ensure you retain your original tax invoice/purchase receipt showing a $0 balance for verification purposes….

Q: When does the promotion start and end?

A: Purchase period opens at 8.01am AEDST on 13 November 2017 and ends at close of business AEDST on 14 January 2018

Q: How long do I have to complete my claim form?

Claims and corresponding proof of purchase must be submitted and received within 22 calendar days of purchase and by no later than 11.59pm (AEDST) on 5 February 2018….”

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The Verge: Fujifilm X-T20 Review: Love, Rekindled

https://www.theverge.com/2017/7/26/16019768/fujifilm-xt20-camera-review-price-release

“… The Fujifilm X-T20 is everything that is good about technology. It’s a throwback to the days of necessarily rugged metal bodies, optical viewfinders, and entirely physical control schemes replete with satisfying clicks and clunks from mechanical switches and dials. But it elevates those laudable aspects of old-timey film cameras with judicious use of modern technology, including an electronic viewfinder, the same 24-megapixel APS-C sensor as inside the higher-end Fujifilm X-Pro2 and X-T2, and a reliable autofocus system that’s also very amenable to manual adjustment….”

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The Phoblographer: 5 Compact Cameras That Can Get Most Likely Through the New TSA Regulations

http://www.thephoblographer.com/2017/07/31/5-cameras-that-can-get-most-likely-through-the-new-tsa-regulations/

“If you’re not wanting to inconvenience your life with taking your cameras, lenses, flashes and other necessary items out of your bag, then you should consider this list of cameras that will get through the TSA’s new regulations….”