Articles & News

Opening Night, The 2019 Loud and Luminous Exhibition, St Leonards, NSW, Australia, April 11 2019

I attended the launch of the 2019 Loud and Luminous Exhibition by the Loud and Luminous collective of Australian women and non-binary photographers at Contact Sheet, “an education and mentorship space, a gallery and a co-working space” in the Sydney north shore suburb of St Leonards, located in a complex of creative spaces supported by TWT Developments, Building Hope Foundation and Brand X. 

This is the first time I have encountered these organizations and there may well be some intriguing stories and documentary subjects to be found within them. 

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DPReview: CP+ 2019: Sigma interview – ‘Optical design is always a battle with the design constraints’

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/7487852065/cp-2019-sigma-interview-optical-design-is-always-a-battle-with-the-design-constraints

Last month at the CP+ show in Yokohama we spoke to executives from several major manufacturers, including Sigma. In our conversation with CEO Kazuto Yamaki we discussed his plans for future L-mount lenses (and cameras) and some of the challenges of supporting multiple mounts.

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Sigma 105mm f/1.4 DG HSM | Art prime lens with L-mount. A brilliant portrait focal length but no equivalent lens currently exists for Micro Four Thirds or Fujifilm APS-C cameras.

Commentary

I am looking forward to seeing and trying Sigma’s Art collection L-mount prime lenses scheduled for release sometime this year and that are adapted from the company’s current DSLR Art collection offerings.

One major bugbear of new mirrorless launches such as those of Fujifilm APS-C and medium cameras, Panasonic’s Lumix S1 and S1R 35mm cameras, and Panasonic’s Micro Four Thirds cameras is the relative paucity of lenses.

Canon took 30 years to come up with its near-complete DSLR lens collection and it may well take Fujifilm, Olympus and Panasonic almost as long to flesh out the many gaps in their lens collections.

Professional photographers and cinematographers rely on the availability of large lens collections for their cameras in a way that amateurs and enthusiasts tend not to, especially when relying on prime lenses for their optimum optical and mechanical quality.

I would love to see Sigma creating lenses for Fujifilm X-mount APS-C cameras given there are so many glaring holes in Fujifilm’s lens lineup, and the same desire applies to professional-quality lenses for use on Blackmagic Design, Olympus and Panasonic M43 cameras.

Panasonic and its L-Mount Alliance partners Leica and Sigma have done well to aim at releasing enough lenses to satisfy those contemplating investing in the L-mount camera system, and it is pleasing to read that Sigma will be working on smaller and more affordable L-mount lenses in due course.

Meanwhile those of use needing focal lengths that Fujifilm does not offer for its X-mount and G-mount cameras may need to bite the bullet and rely on adapted EF-mount lenses instead of the much-preferred native X-mount and G-mount alternatives that simply do not exist yet.

I am still hoping for a professional-quality alternative to Fujifilm’s too-quirky, too-slow Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0 R prime lens with its 35mm sensor equivalent focal length of 28mm, a staple optic for many documentary photographers and photojournalists, me included.

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  • Sigma LensesB&H

Panasonic UK Lumix Ambassador Nick Driftwood Shares His Lumix S1 Custom Modes Settings File for Video

UK Panasonic Lumix ambassador and longtime video innovator Nick Driftwood is kindly sharing his custom settings file for shooting NTSC and Pal video with the newly-released Panasonic Lumix DC-S1 35mm sensor format hybrid stills and video camera. 

Creating settings like these can be a painstaking enough business with Panasonic’s Micro Four Thirds cameras and even more so with the Lumix S1 given it offers a total of thirteen, yes thirteen, custom settings slots as opposed to the five of its smaller-sensor siblings. 

Mr Driftwood has my gratitude for creating this settings file and even more so for making it available for free instead of a fee, at his Nick Driftwood’s Filmmaker Emporium

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Panasonic Lumix DC-S1R with Panasonic Lumix S 24-105mm f/4.0 zoom lens.

As I discovered last week, the Lumix S1 and S1R are great cameras for stills photography though I have yet to try them out for video.

Mr Driftwood confirms my observation about the S1’s photography capabilities, and he has more to say about it as a video camera:

This is a great camera for photographers with its 24MP FF sensor offering really good low light performance – its very clean even at 10000 ISO!

But it also translates over to decent looking video with its 4K 24p, 25p, 30p, 50p, 60p performance. Then there’s also the brilliant 4K/6KPhoto mode that can shoot 60fps in 4K/ 30fps in near 6K (for example 4:3 aspect mode is 4992×3744 pixels).

Switching around manually all these settings can be tiresome, so, I wanted to invite users to take a look at the custom mode features where you can set and store all your favourite settings and recall them in an instance. It saves so much time being able to load settings all in one go!

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Hands on with the LUMIX S1 & S1R, Ted’s World of Imaging, Sydney, April 4 2019

Having been to digiDirect’s public launch of the Panasonic Lumix DC-S1 and DC-S1R cameras and the initial three lenses on April 1st, with hands on the S1 and Lumix S 24-105mm f/4.0 zoom lens, I wanted to get to know the higher megapixel S1R and the Lumix S Pro 50mm f/1.4 prime lens. 

With both cameras I immediately learned there is so much more to them than two brief events like these can reveal, such as their video and high resolution mode capabilities, but getting a decent feel for how they work and what they are capable of is crucial. 

Getting a good feel is exactly what I did to the point where I was impressed enough to consider purchasing the S1R for portrait photography sometime in the future, with an eye on mating it up with some coming wide aperture lenses from members of the L-Mount Alliance. 

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Panasonic Lumix DC-S1R with Panasonic Lumix S 24-105mm f/4.0 zoom lens.

Hands on with the LUMIX S1 & S1R, Ted’s World of Imaging, Sydney, April 4 2019

Portraits, Panasonic Lumix DC-S1R with Panasonic Lumix S Pro 50mm f/1.4

Image Notes

Portraits in the gallery above were made by Karin Gottschalk with the Panasonic Lumix DC-S1R equipped with Panasonic Lumix S Pro 50mm f/1.4 as raw files, converted from .RW2 raw to .TIFF files using the L. Monochrome D profile in Adobe Camera Raw 11.2.1 then processed in Alien Skin Exposure X4 using the Platinum Print Warm analog simulation profile.

All JPEGs here have been reduced in size, so they can only hint at the detail and visual richness of the S1R’s raw files that would be better revealed as large format prints.

I often saw photo gallery shows in London where all the images were printed rich and dark in platinum to draw viewers in and impart a sense of mystery, and drama, and the photographs were shot in medium format roll film or 4″x5″ and 8″x 10″ sheet film, so my aim in making these portraits was to pay homage to that look.

Although I did not have the means to print my own work as platinum prints aka platinotypes when I was working as a magazine editorial portrait photographer, I printed my portfolio work in silver-rich baryta photographic papers that I toned or split-toned to simulate non-silver printing processes as well as silver-based processes like Lith printing.

I showed these images to magazine art directors who were so excited by their expressive possibilities that they fought to have all pages printed in four colour instead of some in colour and the rest in black ink only.

My favourite camera in those years was my Zone VI Studios 4″x5″ field camera based on the Tachihara Wista camera made of cherrywood, and my favourite monochrome film was the now tragically deceased Polaroid Type 55 positive/negative film that I shot at 20 ISO for proof prints and 12 ISO for negatives.

My method was to shoot with medium wide or medium telephoto large format lenses with the aperture wide open or stopped down by one-third or half a stop, light minimally with a three-light Broncolor monobloc flash light kit, dunk the instant-processed Polaroid Type 55 in a Polaroid bucket on location then complete the negative processing, washing and drying back in the studio.

My aim was to produce deeply emotive close-up and full-face portraits, and environmental portraits, that would leap out of the printed page, stopping dead then drawing readers in as they flicked through the magazine.

The combination of Panasonic Lumix DC-S1R with Panasonic Lumix S Pro 50mm f/1.4 helped me simulate aspects of that approach to analog portrait photography and I look forward to spending more time with the S1R and its lenses present and future sometime soon.

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Panasonic S1 & S1R Launch, digiDirect, Sydney, April 1 2019

I attended the first Panasonic S-Series touch-and-try launch event for members of the public in Sydney, hosted by digiDirect at the House of Merivale in the CBD on the 1st April. 

The organisers provided a number of Panasonic S1 and S1R mirrorless 35mm sensor cameras mostly equipped with Panasonic Lumix S 24-105mm f/4.0 Macro OIS zoom lenses, though I spotted a couple of Panasonic Lumix S PRO 70-200mm f/4.0 OIS telephoto zoom lenses and a Panasonic Lumix S PRO 50mm f/1.4 prime lens. 

My first impressions of the S1 as a stills photography camera are positive though limited due to the circumstances, but it came across as very well-designed and well-manufactured, and it performed better than hoped for in available darkness. 

Panasonic S-Series cameras and lenses at House of Merivale, Sydney, 1st April 2019

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After some initial snapshots in colour with the S1’s default settings, I selected monochrome HLG Photo mode to better focus on the people and gear being shown.

Each photograph produced three files, the JPEGs that you see above and that I have resized without any other image editing, an .RW2 raw file and an .HSP HLG Photo file that is apparently currently only viewable on the latest high-end 4K Panasonic television sets.

The .RW2 and .HLG files are not yet supported by the latest version of macOS and none of the raw processing and image editing software that I use.

Panasonic S1 and S1R: When will raw processing software be ready?

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DxO PhotoLab in its previous incarnation as DxO Optics Pro Elite was the very first fully-fledged raw processing application I purchased after disappointments with Adobe Camera Raw, and it continues to do a brilliant job of processing raw files from cameras by most makers except for Fujifilm, though it does process raw files from my Fujifilm Finepix X100.

If I come across estimates as to when other raw processing and image editing applications will gain support for Panasonic S1 and S1R raw files then I will add it here.

At the moment I am downloading a version of Silkypix that apparently supports the S1 and S1R and will put it to the test when it eventually arrives (thanks, NBN, for your appalling download and especially upload speeds).

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David Thorpe: A Look At Three Wide Aperture Sigma Lenses For Micro Four Thirds

“At a time when Olympus and Panasonic lens prices are going through the roof, Sigma offers these three f/1.4 ‘Contemporary’ lenses at sensible prices. Do they sacrifice sharpness, focus speed or build quality to price? Having owned, used and reviewed – many Sigma lenses over the years, I didn’t anticipate any nasty surprises and I didn’t find any. There were some nice surprises, though….”

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Sigma DC DN Contemporary prime lens roadmap for Sony E-mount and Micro Four Thirds mount.

Sigma 16mm f/1.4, 30mm f/1.4 and 56mm f/1.4 DC DN Contemporary prime lenses for E-mount and M43-mount cameras

Commentary

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Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC DN Contemporary fast prime lens in M43-mount and E-Mount on Sony and Olympus cameras.

Former Fleet Street press photographer David Thorpe is one of the least-known yet most-respected YouTube reviewers with a speciality in Micro Four Thirds system cameras and lenses, though I suspect he will be bending that speciality soon with coming reviews of Panasonic’s Lumix S-Series S1 and S1R 35mm sensor format cameras and lenses.

I have no hands-on experience of Sigma lenses whether prime or zoom, though I was lucky enough to inspect Paul Leeming’s Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art zoom lens with Canon EF-mount that he has adapted for his Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K and was impressed enough with its optics and construction that I am hoping to buy one of my own some time soon.

Clearly Sigma has something good going for it with its membership of the L-Mount alliance alongside Panasonic and Leica, and Mr Thorpe’s review of these three Sigma Contemporary collection prime lenses supports that impression.

With their 35mm sensor format equivalent focal lengths of 32mm, 60mm and 112mm, and fast, wide maximum apertures of f/1.4, and very reasonable pricing, these three lenses look well worth considering for use in stills photography.

I am now looking for some hard-core technical reviews of them for consideration as video lenses too.

My current impression of Sigma’s Contemporary lenses is that they are designed to work in connection with in-camera and image editing raw processing software for correction of any possible optical distortion, whereas Sigma’s Art lens collection that includes the 18-35mm f/1.8 zoom is reportedly designed to the finest of optical standards to obviate the need for correction in software.

That aside, I have been looking for a medium telephoto portrait lens for Micro Four Thirds for some time now, and Sigma’s 56mm f/1.4 DC DN C may well fill the bill.

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Nikon Micro-Nikkor 105mm f/2.8 manual focus, manual exposure macro lens.

I originally got into portrait photography with Nikon’s Micro-Nikkor 105mm f/4.0 lens and focal lengths closer to 105mm in the 35mm sensor format are my first choice for work in the genre, so the 112mm equivalent of the 56mm lens is not a bad approximation.

The Sigma 56mm offers the advantage of a wide aperture to blur distracting backgrounds if necessary.

Similarly, I discovered long ago that my preferred main focal length for immersive documentary and photojournalism work is 28mm in the 35mm sensor format, and Sigma’s 16mm f/1.4 DC DN C with its 32mm equivalent focal length is not too far from that.

I like to be able to use my lenses for cinematography and photography, and prefer lenses that perform well in both applications given raw processing can correct optical distortions in still images but non-linear editing software cannot do the same for video.

My favourite raw processing software for raw files shot on Panasonic cameras is DxO PhotoLab so I am hoping that DxO has added camera-and-lens profiles for all three of these Sigma lenses for recent and current Lumix cameras to its database.

Off to DxOMark and time to drop into some camera stores to touch, try and shoot some sample pix with these three lenses so I can crack some raw files open in DxO PhotoLab, DxO FilmPack and DxO ViewPoint.

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  • Sigma 16mm f/1.4 DC DN Contemporary LensB&H
  • Sigma 30mm f/1.4 DC DN Contemporary LensB&H
  • Sigma 56mm f/1.4 DC DN Contemporary LensB&H
  • Sigma 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art LensB&H

DPReview: CP+ 2019: Fujifilm interview – ‘We want to show photographers the future’

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/8410636142/cp-2019-fujifilm-interview-we-want-to-show-photographers-the-future

“At the CP+ show earlier this month in Yokohama Japan, we sat down with senior executives from Fujifilm. During our conversation we covered everything from the upcoming GFX 100, to plans for APS-C and why the X100 still occupies such an important position in the company’s lineup.

Our interview was conducted with three senior executives in Fujifilm’s Electronic Imaging Products Division:

  • Toshi Iida, General Manager.
  • Makoto Oishi, Product Planning Manager.
  • Shin Udono, Senior Manager of the Sales and Marketing Group.…”

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Daniel J. Cox: Micro Four Thirds Triad-Part 1 and Part 2

“Moving to the smaller, lighter, less expensive​ Panasonic Lumix Micro Four Thirds cameras has made my photography travel life much more enjoyable. Gone are the days of carrying around 12 pound lenses. Getting the most from the smaller systems I’ve started following what I call the Micro Four Thirds Triad. This first video, of my two-part series, explains the cameras and lenses needed to follow the Micro Four Thirds Triad. Watch this video to find out how you can downsize and still get the most possible out of these smaller cameras that save you cash and physical pain. Part two will be released shortly that explains the last part of the triad which is software. Software that solves most problems we have with the smaller cameras so you can produce images that compete beautifully with the larger full frame​ systems….”

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Panasonic DC-G9 with DMW-BGG9 battery grip and Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 12-60mm f/2.8-4.0 Aspheric Power OIS zoom lens.

Commentary

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The now sadly discontinued Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 with Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 12mm f/1.4 Aspheric prime lens, still going strong as a Micro Four Thirds professional-quality hybrid stills and video camera.

It is timely that wildlife photographer and Panasonic Lumix Ambassador Daniel J. Cox has released his two video about the Micro Four Thirds triad – cameras, lenses and raw image processing – when Panasonic’s Lumix S-Series 35mm sensor format cameras have been announced and are now showing up in touch-and-try events at camera stores around the world.

There is plenty of life left still in the M43 sensor format for photography and video, and many M43 users will doubtless be resisting the temptation to swap over to the larger 35mm sensor format, also misleadingly known as “full frame” and “full format”, and its consequently larger, heavier and costlier cameras and lenses.

I have yet to experience the pleasure of touching and trying Panasonic’s Lumix S1 and S1R cameras and lenses, and am looking forward to several touch-and-try events in Sydney CBD camera stores next week.

Right now I do have some years of experience using Panasonic’s excellent little M43 camera and lenses, as well as Olympus’ M.Zuiko Pro professional-quality lenses, for photography and video, and can attest to the high image quality that can obtained from the M43 sensor format.

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The Olympus M.Zuiko Pro professional prime and zoom lens collection as of late 2017, all with manual clutch focus, invaluable for fast, accurate and repeatable manual focusing as well as linear focus-by-wire and autofocus.

When I first tried out M43 cameras and lenses, I was struck at how well-suited they are to documentary photography and photojournalism due to their small size and oftentimes innocuous appearance quite unlike that of the big and heavy DSLR cameras and three-zoom-lens kits of which my former magazine and newspaper colleagues still seem to be fond.

There is nothing wrong with larger cameras, as I amply proved every day during my editorial photography career when I would rely on 4″x5″ sheet film, 120 roll film and 35mm rangefinder cameras far more than I did on the regulation 35mm analog film SLRs of the day.

The Panasonic Lumix S1R with its almost-50 megapixels of resolution, for example, is an intriguing proposition for shooting portraits to be printed extra large for exhibiting in gallery shows.

But meanwhile Daniel J. Cox is sharing some good advice in these videos on how to produce image files large and detailed enough to print up to 24″ x 36″ for exhibition and sale to collectors.

I can attest to the quality and speed of using Mr Cox’s number one raw processing software choice, DxO PhotoLab, as well as the utility value of ON1, Inc.’s ON1 Resize 2018 software which is also available as a component of ON1 Photo Raw.

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Big, heavy and expensive 35mm sensor format DSLRs and their zoom lenses remain the gear of choice for local newspaper photographers, if their necks and backs can take the strain.

I note that he lists Phase One’s Capture One Pro as his second choice for raw image processing and image editing, and can attest that it makes a great choice when processing Fujifilm X-Trans image files which are, sadly, not supported by DxO PhotoLab.

I often carry a Panasonic M43 camera alongside a Fujifilm APS-C camera, most often my X-Pro2 along with my Lumix GX8, for their distinctly different ways of seeing and recording the world, and it can be difficult to tell which picture was shot with what camera when processing both in Capture One Pro, especially when applying film simulation styles from any of 1stylespro’s three collections – Portrait Styles, Film Styles or Film Styles Extended.

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Richard Wong: Interview with director of Panasonic Imaging Division – Yosuke Yamane San

“I had the honour to interview Yosuke Yamane-san during the Asia Pacific regional Lumix S series launch event in Tasmania, Australia. In this interview, we talked about the development of Panasonic Lumix S1 & S1R, the L-Mount alliance, Lumix GH6, DFD Autofocus, and a few other things….”

panasonic_lumix_s1r_02_1024px
Panasonic Lumix DC-S1R with Panasonic Lumix S 24-105mm f/4.0 zoom lens.

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