PauL Leeming’s Leeming LUT Pro Now Released for Fujifilm F-Log, LUTs for Eterna Cinema, Pro Neg Std and HLG for Rec709 Coming Soon

Cinematographer/director Paul Leeming of Leeming LUT Pro and Visceral Psyche. Photograph made by Karin Gottschalk with Fujifilm X-T3 and Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R then processed in Alien Skin Exposure X4 using Summer Blockbuster cinematic preset.

Australian feature film cinematographer/director Paul Leeming has released the first camera profile correction look-up table in his Leeming LUT Pro set for Fujifilm X-Trans sensor-equipped cameras, for Fujifilm’s F-Log logarithmic shooting profile, with Eterna Cinema, Pro Neg Std and HLG for Rec709 LUTs to come. 

This is a significant and long-awaited event given that Fujifilm has finally delivered on its longtime promise to radically improve its cameras’ video capabilities with the Fujifilm X-T3 and X-H1, with the coming X-H2 hopefully improving on the X-T3 as a moviemaking hybrid mirrorless camera in Super 35 format. 

Super 35 has long been the feature film format of choice for narrative and documentary production, and the arrival of improved video capabilities on Fujifilm’s X-T2 cameras was a relief after the disappointment of the X-Pro2’s video support. 

Leeming LUT Pro for F-Log on Fujifilm cameras with X-Trans sensors

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Still frame from sample footage of Leeming LUT Pro for Fujifilm F-Log in use with video from Fujifilm X-T3.

Even the recently announced X-Pro3 appears to have 4K Super 35 video features that may prove good enough in a pinch when more video-oriented cameras are unavailable.

The Leeming LUT Pro expose and correction methodology is based on exposing to the right aka ETTR followed by correction via camera-specific look-up-table files in one’s nonlinear editing suite or colour grading software of choice.

The ETTR method’s most vocal proponent was the late Michael Reichmann who was in favour for its use in photography and videography, and although he and many other photographers constantly lobbied camera makers for auto-ETTR in their Live View-capable cameras, to no effect so far.

Why camera makers continue to ignore the necessity of optimal exposure is anyone’s guess.

For that reason I am grateful that Paul Leeming has applied himself to solving the problem of correct exposure followed by correcting colour via Leeming LUT Pro, with the added benefit of making footage shot on a variety of affordable cameras usable in the same timeline without excessive shot matching work.

The ideal, maximum possible dynamic range and realistic colours, using Leeming LUT Pro and Expose-To-The-Right (ETTR)

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Footage with Leeming LUT Pro applied in nonlinear editing suite.

Uncorrected camera maker luma and colorimetry

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“Uncorrected manufacturer luma curve and colorimetry. Notice how the X shape is all distorted and not straight, and how it artificially lifts the mids to make them much brighter (a favourite trick of the manufacturers to make their images appear brighter than the sensor is recording them).”

Luma curve and colorimetry levels corrected with Leeming LUT Pro

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“Corrected luma curve. Notice how straight the X shape is. As an aside, you can also see the fixed colorimetry levels.”

In the light of camera makers’ tendency to fudge their camera’s video output as illustrated above, exposing to the right appears to make footage appear darker than one may be accustomed to, but Mr Leeming has made available other, secondary, LUTs to quickly and easily raise footage low values, as explained below.

As usual, the LUT will “darken” the footage, which really just means it will make the curve perfectly LINEAR. Examine the attached image using your waveform scope in your favourite editing software, and you’ll see what that means, with the exposure steps forming a perfect “X” shape in linear fashion. This is of course ETTR, so if you under-expose your image, it will look darker.

The LUT(s) don’t make the image darker. The LUT(s) correct the manufacturer luma curves to be linear. In most (but not all) cases, this results in the image “appearing” to be darker, but it’s not affecting anything, nor clipping anything, nor adding additional noise that wasn’t in the shot to begin with.

Don’t forget, you also have the Apollo Pro Quickies to use after the corrective LUT in case you want to brighten the image without clipping the highlights or adding any more shot noise. But when you can, please ETTR and save yourself the problems (and give yourself the cleanest possible log image to begin with).

If your shot after LUT application has its highlights not reaching 100% IRE, then you underexposed it. Use the zebras as per the guide to see where the clipping point is. Expose just shy of that and you’ll maximise sensor dynamic range and minimise shot noise.

If you HAVE underexposed or simply want a brighter image post-corrective LUT, try following it with one or more of my Apollo Pro Quickies, which are expressly designed to lift the shadows in a natural way without clipping the highlights.

Stills frames from feature film shot by Paul Leeming, ungraded then graded with Leeming LUT Pro

Settings for shooting video Fujifilm cameras for processing with Leeming LUT Pro

  • Pro Neg Std, Eterna Cinema, F-log or HLG
  • H265 recording format
  • DR100 for all profiles
  • Highlight tone 0
  • Shadow tone 0
  • Color 0
  • Sharpness -4
  • Noise Reduction -4
  • Zebra level 100%

Quick and dirty Leeming LUT Pro for Fujifilm F-Log tryout with Fujifilm X-H1 F-Log footage

I shoot documentary stills and video rather than make narrative feature movies, so often work alone under challenging conditions as in this example.

The Fujifilm X-H1 had a vintage Zeiss Jena Pentacon 50mm f/1.8 MC Auto prime lens attached to it via a Gobe M42-to-X-mount adapter with no neutral density filter, and I fudged on setting a custom white balance as I was more concerned with understanding the creative possibilities of this lens for video than in getting technicalities perfect.

An adapted 50mm lens on an APS-C/Super 35 camera equates to 75mm in the 35mm sensor format, which is one of my favourite focal lengths for documentary photography and video.

I have been throughly enjoying trying out this lens and its companion, a Panagor PMC 28mm f/2.8 wide-angle prime lens that Paul Leeming kindly gave us.

These sorts of vintage prime lenses are rare and overpriced here in Sydney, at least ever since camera stores like Foto Reisel with their secondhand gear cabinets closed down.

Fujifilm Super 35/APS-C hybrid cameras capable of shooting 4K and Cinema 4K F-Log video as well as in other picture profiles: X-T3, X-H1 and X-Pro3

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  • Fujifilm XF and GFX CamerasB&H
  • FUJIFILM X-Pro3 Mirrorless Digital Camera B&H
  • Fujifilm XF LensesB&H

fcp.co: An Overview of the Apple Hardware Ecosystem for Video Professionals

http://www.fcp.co/final-cut-pro/articles/2210-an-overview-of-the-apple-hardware-ecosystem-for-video-professionals

“In this article, Sam Mestman looks at each Apple product that can shoot or edit, indicates its place for filmmaking and also tells us which models he recommends. If you’re thinking of buying a new Mac, iPad or iPhone, this is for you!”

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Apple iPhone 11 Pro Max: “Featuring a Stunning Pro Display, A13 Bionic, Cutting-Edge Pro Camera System and Longest Battery Life Ever in iPhone with iPhone 11 Pro Max”.

Commentary

Expatriate ex-Wollongong moviemaker Sam Mestman and longtime contributor to Final Cut Pro website fcp.co recently assumed an editorial role there with the aim of stepping up his articles for the site after giving up his coalface role at post-production workflow company LumaForge.

Mr Mestman has been instrumental as an ambassador, educator and advocate for moviemaking for the people throughout the United States and shares invaluable insights in his articles.

I highly recommend regular visits to fcp.co to all moviemakers whether you use Apple hardware and software or not.

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No Film School: Why I Switched to Final Cut Pro X After 25 Years of Working on Avid

https://nofilmschool.com/switched-final-cut-pro-x-after-25-years

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“I spent a quarter of a century editing on Avid and several years on Premiere Pro, so why did I decide to ditch them both and go with Final Cut Pro X? I’ll tell ya….

There’s a small but growing number of editors who have made the jump. The process is fairly predictable.  Surprise when we first hear a fellow editor rave about FCPX. Followed by a willingness to give it a shot.  And then two weeks of massive discouragement and frustration, because it’s unlike any other edit system we’ve used before. And finally, the lightbulb moment, the “NOW I get it” realization that comes with understanding the radically different workflow….”

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Paul Leeming Releases Leeming LUT Pro for Panasonic, Sony and Other Cameras, Now Working on LUTs and Settings for Fujifilm Cameras

Cinematographer/director Paul Leeming of Leeming LUT Pro and Visceral Psyche. Photograph made by Karin Gottschalk with Fujifilm X-T3 and Fujinon XF 56mm f/1.2 R then processed in Alien Skin Exposure X4 using Summer Blockbuster cinematic preset.

Leeming LUT Pro has been released for a range of popular mirrorless, drone and action cameras, so Paul Leeming is working on his Leeming LUT Pro Fujifilm combo pack.

Mr Leeming has just purchased a Fujifilm X-T3 Super 35/APS-C hybrid camera in order to dig deep into Fujifilm cameras’ video settings and capabilities.

Cameras currently supported by Leeming LUT Pro include those made by Blackmagic Design, DJI, GoPro, Panasonic and Sony, with a list of which camera models are included now available at the Leeming LUT Pro web page.

The use of LUTs aka look-up tables for camera-matching profiles, dynamic range curve correction and creative looks is supported by a number modern nonlinear editing and colour grading applications including Adobe Photoshop, Adobe Premiere Pro, Apple Final Cut Pro, Avid Media Composer, Cyberlink PowerDirector, DaVince Resolve and Resolve Studio, Grass Valley Edius, HitFilm, Magix Vegas and a number of third-party colour grading plug-ins.

Several external recorders and monitor/recorders connected via SDI or HDMI are also supported by Leeming LUT Pro including those made by Atomos, BlackMagic Design, Convergent Design and Video Devices.

The news that Leeming LUT Pro will soon be supporting Fujifilm cameras is particularly welcome given that the Fujifilm X-T3 and X-T30 are proving to be excellent and affordable Super 35 video production cameras whether used standalone or connected via HDMI to external monitor/recorders.

Using Leeming LUT Pro

There appears to be persistent and widespread confusion about how best to expose video with no end of theories flying about and pundits purporting to know which theory is currently the best or the trendiest.

Mr Leeming has throughly researched the technical aspects and limitations of a range of current and recent hybrid camera sensors and has delved deep into each manufacturer’s colour science in this longtime RED camera owner’s quest to derive the best and most photorealistic colour from every camera.

I have watched him test cameras at the Unititled studio and have noted the thoroughness with which he does it, well-qualifying him to issue PDF manuals on how to best set-up each camera, how to best expose and how best to use LUTs in NLEs and colour grading software.

Correct exposure is achieved via exposing-to-the-right aka ETTR, a principle originally promoted by the late Michael Reichmann of The Luminous Landscape aka LuLa for digital stills photography but equally applicable to digital video.

The aim of ETTR is to adjust “the exposure of an image as high as possible at base ISO (without causing unwanted saturation) to collect the maximum amount of light and thus get the optimum performance out of the digital image sensor” according to Wikipedia’s entry on the technique.

I am currently awaiting before and after samples and other supporting images for current Leeming LUT Pro combo packs and when received will be publishing articles on each and how they work, so please come back to Unititled soon!

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DPReview: Secrets of a professional photographer’s workflow: Brian Ach

https://www.dpreview.com/articles/3321963167/a-professional-s-workflow-brian-ach

“… For a lot of us, we download the images to a computer and edit a handful that catch our eye, and then… well, there are more photo shoots to pursue. Maybe we’ll apply some keywords, perhaps mark a few favorites, but too often the photos we worked so hard to create are just dumped onto a hard disk and forgotten. We know we should do better, but who has the time?

Professional photographers, that’s who….”

Icon, Photo Mechanic 6 by Camera Bits.
Icon, Photo Mechanic 6 by Camera Bits.

Commentary

Getty Images and Associated Press contributing photographer Brian Ach shoots a range of subjects and genres, often under the stress of tight deadlines, poor artificial lighting and the need to get every shot right or if not then the ability to rapidly reduce his selects to a manageable collection for submission, distribution and publication.

That is a far cry from the more leisurely paces and demands of shooting documentary or photojournalism projects over longer time periods, or portraits and photoessays for weekly or monthly magazine feature articles.

I took on a mix of projects during my magazine and newspaper colour supplement days, and came to prefer weekly or monthly magazine projects over daily newspaper assignments for the chance to really get one’s teeth into the subject.

Daily newspaper work had its satisfactions, though, especially in the challenge of producing engaging, informative and sometimes emotive environmental and close-up portraits in no more than fifteen minutes per subject, three to five such assignments per day, in locations throughout the city and suburbs, while carting lights, cameras, stands and tripods about.

That was during the analog era when the time and the stress of processing, proofing and printing after each assignment had to be factored into the equation and before the joys of tethered shooting, editing, processing, tagging, uploading and traveling on to the next job existed as we know them now.

If I were to go back to that world as a freelancer I would have to come up with a whole new workflow all by myself, or learn successful workflows from others, so articles like this come in handy.

So much so that I went straight to the Camera Bits website to download Photo Mechanic to try out, and from a so-far fairly cursory try-out under anything but professional conditions am seriously considering adding it to my software collection.

And I am now crossing my fingers for a similar feature set to appear in the library functionality that is appearing in raw processing and image editing applications that once used to be editing-only.

There is another advantage to having an application dedicated only to selecting, trashing, tagging and organizing – none of the distractions of doing it within a product that also offers deep image-editing features where one can easily be tempted into diving down the rabbit hole of a thousand and one different possible interpretations.

Sometimes, oftentimes, simpler and sharply focused is better.

Now to get to grips with that massive backlog.

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Daniel J. Cox: Micro Four Thirds Triad-Part 1 and Part 2

“Moving to the smaller, lighter, less expensive​ Panasonic Lumix Micro Four Thirds cameras has made my photography travel life much more enjoyable. Gone are the days of carrying around 12 pound lenses. Getting the most from the smaller systems I’ve started following what I call the Micro Four Thirds Triad. This first video, of my two-part series, explains the cameras and lenses needed to follow the Micro Four Thirds Triad. Watch this video to find out how you can downsize and still get the most possible out of these smaller cameras that save you cash and physical pain. Part two will be released shortly that explains the last part of the triad which is software. Software that solves most problems we have with the smaller cameras so you can produce images that compete beautifully with the larger full frame​ systems….”

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Panasonic DC-G9 with DMW-BGG9 battery grip and Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Elmarit 12-60mm f/2.8-4.0 Aspheric Power OIS zoom lens.

Commentary

panasonic_lumix_gx8_square_waterspray_1024px_60%
The now sadly discontinued Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 with Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 12mm f/1.4 Aspheric prime lens, still going strong as a Micro Four Thirds professional-quality hybrid stills and video camera.

It is timely that wildlife photographer and Panasonic Lumix Ambassador Daniel J. Cox has released his two video about the Micro Four Thirds triad – cameras, lenses and raw image processing – when Panasonic’s Lumix S-Series 35mm sensor format cameras have been announced and are now showing up in touch-and-try events at camera stores around the world.

There is plenty of life left still in the M43 sensor format for photography and video, and many M43 users will doubtless be resisting the temptation to swap over to the larger 35mm sensor format, also misleadingly known as “full frame” and “full format”, and its consequently larger, heavier and costlier cameras and lenses.

I have yet to experience the pleasure of touching and trying Panasonic’s Lumix S1 and S1R cameras and lenses, and am looking forward to several touch-and-try events in Sydney CBD camera stores next week.

Right now I do have some years of experience using Panasonic’s excellent little M43 camera and lenses, as well as Olympus’ M.Zuiko Pro professional-quality lenses, for photography and video, and can attest to the high image quality that can obtained from the M43 sensor format.

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The Olympus M.Zuiko Pro professional prime and zoom lens collection as of late 2017, all with manual clutch focus, invaluable for fast, accurate and repeatable manual focusing as well as linear focus-by-wire and autofocus.

When I first tried out M43 cameras and lenses, I was struck at how well-suited they are to documentary photography and photojournalism due to their small size and oftentimes innocuous appearance quite unlike that of the big and heavy DSLR cameras and three-zoom-lens kits of which my former magazine and newspaper colleagues still seem to be fond.

There is nothing wrong with larger cameras, as I amply proved every day during my editorial photography career when I would rely on 4″x5″ sheet film, 120 roll film and 35mm rangefinder cameras far more than I did on the regulation 35mm analog film SLRs of the day.

The Panasonic Lumix S1R with its almost-50 megapixels of resolution, for example, is an intriguing proposition for shooting portraits to be printed extra large for exhibiting in gallery shows.

But meanwhile Daniel J. Cox is sharing some good advice in these videos on how to produce image files large and detailed enough to print up to 24″ x 36″ for exhibition and sale to collectors.

I can attest to the quality and speed of using Mr Cox’s number one raw processing software choice, DxO PhotoLab, as well as the utility value of ON1, Inc.’s ON1 Resize 2018 software which is also available as a component of ON1 Photo Raw.

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Big, heavy and expensive 35mm sensor format DSLRs and their zoom lenses remain the gear of choice for local newspaper photographers, if their necks and backs can take the strain.

I note that he lists Phase One’s Capture One Pro as his second choice for raw image processing and image editing, and can attest that it makes a great choice when processing Fujifilm X-Trans image files which are, sadly, not supported by DxO PhotoLab.

I often carry a Panasonic M43 camera alongside a Fujifilm APS-C camera, most often my X-Pro2 along with my Lumix GX8, for their distinctly different ways of seeing and recording the world, and it can be difficult to tell which picture was shot with what camera when processing both in Capture One Pro, especially when applying film simulation styles from any of 1stylespro’s three collections – Portrait Styles, Film Styles or Film Styles Extended.

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  • Olympus lensesB&H
  • Panasonic camerasB&H
  • Panasonic lensesB&H
  • Phase One Capture One ProB&H

JDW: Using Rec.2020 HLG on a Rec.709 timeline in FCPX

“This video demystifies use of Rec.2020 HDR footage on a Rec.709 timeline in Final Cut Pro X 10.4.x, especially for Panasonic GH5 & GH5S users who shoot in HLG. I don’t own a SONY camera, but the same workflow shown in my video would apply to Sony Rec.2020 HLG as well. Leeming LUT offers a Sony HLG to Rec.709 LUT….”

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LumaForge: Is Final Cut Pro for Hollywood?

https://resources.lumaforge.com/blog/is-final-cut-pro-x-for-hollywood

“Josh Beal is a Hollywood editor who has work on such shows as Counterpart, Bloodline, and House of Cards. As a TV editor, Josh thinks it is time for Hollywood to reconsider Final Cut Pro X as a viable editing platform. In this presentation, Josh explains why Avid Media Composer is the King of the NLE in Hollywood and what needs to happen to convince current Media Composer editors to switch over to Final Cut Pro X….

… “I believe it’s the most forward-looking NLE on the market,” Beal says of FCPX….”

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Apple Final Cut Pro X on Apple 27″ iMac Pro with Retina 5K Display (Late 2017).

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Lesspain Software: Kyno 1.6 is Here

“Kyno 1.6 brings checksum-verified camera offloading, new metadata and copy workflows, Red (R3D, Redcode) Raw support and tons of other improvements. Check out the release notes at lesspain.software…”

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Kyno 1.6 is here!

https://support.lesspain.software/support/solutions/articles/12000016005-release-notes-for-kyno-1

1.6.0 (macOS: 106027, Windows: 1.6.0.23) – Released 2019-02-25

This major update brings a number of exciting new features and improvements as well as fixes for issues that have been reported.

The highlight of this feature is without a doubt the addition of verified copy (sometimes called “offloading”) using industry grade checksum verification based on the established media hash list (MHL) standard. From now on, you never have to leave your favourite workflow tool from camera card to edit/delivery.

Kyno Premium users will welcome the much-requested support for the RED RAW R3D format that you can preview and transcode with Kyno 1.6.

If you’re looking to get in touch with us directly be sure to drop us a line at @lesspainsoft on Twitter or on Facebook at facebook.com/lesspainsoft. If you have questions or need support just pop on over to support.lesspain.software and we’ll point you in the right direction.

What’s New (all editions):

  • Added “Copy & verify” function (aka verified copy, aka offloading) that copies your camera media or any folder with industry-grade verification using the media hash list (MHL) standard, full or incremental mode supported.
  • Added workflow for exporting and importing/merging descriptive metadata to aid collaborative workflows that operate on multiple copies of the same material.
  • Added new “Paste & rename” workflow for people copying and batch-renaming in one step as part of their ingest process.
  • When browsing through similar clips using the “next” and “previous” button or shortcut audio track and speed settings are retained for similar clips.
  • Added marker and subclip statistics to “Create report” function
  • Improved stereo audio track handling when sending files to Premiere Pro
  • Use full file name as clip name when sending to Premiere (or exporting for Resolve) instead of removing file extension to be consistent with what Premiere does on regular import
  • Display the XDCAM type in clip metadata for XDCAM footage
  • Support rewrapping of HEVC files to Mov container
  • Selected audio track and playback speed are retained when skipping through similar files
  • Thumbnails are now created with current LUT settings applied
  • LUTs are now applied when exporting still frames from videos
  • Added fade in/out support to transcoder
  • Added preset for XDCAM HD 422 29.97 FPS
  • Added FPS column to Excel export
  • Include marker and subclip titles when matching search term in the Browser filter
  • Added possibility to filter assets based on folder name and date range
  • Allow tags to be imported and exported
  • Added a global index as a naming variable to count across multiple rename, export or transcode operations
  • Added video/audio codec, format, start, end, path as optional metadata columns in Browser
  • Display overlay icons for tags, metadata, markers in list mode
  • Support playback of certain old PCM audio tracks from old camcorders
  • Improved sorting in Navigator tree
  • Adjusted labels for color properties to be more in line with industry standards
  • Made subclip time range controls in transcoder window take into account clip timecode
  • Renamed MJPEG transcoding preset to Photo JPEG because it’s more known under that name

What’s New (Premium edition):

  • RED RAW R3D support (playback and transcoding)
  • Multi-Destination verified copy (aka offloading) in one step. Back up your camera media in a simple workflow in two locations
  • Added ability to automatically transcode files in delivery workflow
  • Added ability to transfer image files together with video files in delivery workflow
  • Add a new folder naming option in delivery options
  • Improve behaviour of delivery folder history
  • Automatically display folders created by local delivery in Navigator tree
  • Sort subfolders correctly in delivery folder selector
  • Improve performance of delivery folder selector for slow connections

New Enterprise Features:

  • Changed Custom Package Deployment configuration overrides to one XML file that can be loaded from file system or via HTTP
  • Added functionality for delivery endpoints to be preconfigured via Custom Package Deployment
  • Added functionality for tags to be preconfigured via custom package deployment

Fixes:

  • Identified and busted the cause for accidental folder moves in the folder navigator
  • Improved display of drag and drop items (folders, clips)
  • Kyno now prevents input of invalid folder names on Windows
  • Fixed Premiere Pro 2019 not being detected automatically by the “Send to” function
  • Fixed a minor inaccuracy in duration filter
  • Fixed a rare crash that happened during drag & drop on certain OSX versions
  • Fixed a bug where moving a file between volumes resulted in a stale file remaining in the old location
  • Fixed a bug on Windows that prevented another volume to be registered in the workspace with the same drive letter
  • Fixed a problem where in rare cases empty clip names where transferred to Premiere or Resolve
  • Fixed a bug that caused certain HDR ProRes files not to play back
  • Fixed a rare freeze on Windows when double-clicking subclips

Kyno 1.6 Screenshots

LumaForge: Media Asset Management and Kyno

Commentary

Kyno goes from strength to strength as it continue to add essential video and photography production functions that many of us have relied for on a cluster of other dedicated applications made by a range of small software companies.

Add up the licence fees for all of that ever-growing cluster of separate applications and compare it to Kyno’s licence fees in whichever version, Kyno, Kyno Premium or Kyno Enterprise, is relevant to your work.

I am particularly excited about Kyno 1.6’s checksum-verified camera offloading after having tried out a number of dedicated offloading products as well as its metadata workflow improvements as the latter has been something of a sore point for a while.

Kyno 1.6’s ability to add two LUTs – one for camera profiles and one for looks LUTs for example – to still frame image files exported from markers as well as thumbnails is also very welcome.

These and more new and improved features are making Kyno the number one on-location media management system for a range of producers including self-funded independent documentary moviemakers and photographers like me.

I have already put the offloading function in Kyno 1.6 – now updated to version 1.6.1 – to good use in the course of reviewing a camera and lens and look forward to putting more of its new features and improvements to use in the coming days.

I can only imagine what may be coming in Kyno 1.7!

Support for Blackmagic Cinema DNG and Blackmagic Raw come to mind right now for example  – I received some sample BMPCC 4K footage from Paul Leeming the other day – and look forward to Kyno adding support for all the latest affordable hybrid and video cameras and camcorders as they appear.

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