Imaging Resource: Fujifilm Q&A: COVID impact, GFX strategy, shrinking IBIS, secrets of a 300,000-cycle shutter and more

https://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2020/09/04/fujifilm-interview-covid-gfx-strategy-shrinking-ibis-300K-cycle-shutter

“… Shin Udono: We continue to investigate future X-H cameras. The X-T4 is not a replacement for X-H1, so we keep our minds open about future X-H models.

Dave Etchells: Ah, OK. So you can’t say specifically, but it’s not your intent for the X-T4 to replace the X-H1. You see a separate market.

Shin Udono: But we will clearly differentiate from the X-T line.

Dave Etchells: So what is that differentiation? What separates X-T and X-H?

Shin Udono: Difficult to say now; we need some sort of the breakthrough, probably.

Jun Watanabe: But actually, after we announced X-T4, studios received a lot of customer’s requests that they want that H1 style.

Shin Udono: Bigger grip, and also…

Toshi Iida: …the command dial control.

Shin Udono: But just having the bigger grip with the X-T4 is not enough for the X-H2. I think that if future X-H models come to reality, we have to have something more revolutionary….”

Fujifilm X-H1 and X-T4

Commentary

panasonic_lumix_dmw-xlr1_mic_adapter_03_1024px
Fujifilm needs one of these for its cameras. Panasonic DMW-XLR1 Microphone Adapter for Panasonic Lumix G and S-Series cameras. Image courtesy of Panasonic Australia.

Good to read that Fujifilm continues to work on the X-H2 professional APS-C/Super 35 hybrid camera and that the company is looking for further differentiation between it and the X-T4.

Here is what I want to see in the X-H2 at the very least, and there is plenty more on my wishlist:

  • Larger grip than the X-H1.
  • Command control dial for extra speed in applying exposure compensation.
  • XLR audio input device such as Panasonic and Sony make for their cameras.
  • Video features that match if not surpass those of Panasonic’s Lumix S and GH cameras, and especially no recording limits.
  • Fully-articulated monitor taking a lesson from the one on Panasonic’s Lumix DC-S1H.

Here is what I want to see in the X-Pro 4:

  • In-body image stabilization aka IBIS so the camera is more suitable for shooting in all sorts of light and especially available darkness.
  • Bright frame for 18mm in the optical viewfinder aka OVF.

Here is what I want to see in lenses for Fujifilm’s X-Series:

  • An upgraded 18mm lens, at least in a ‘Fujicron’ design for documentary and photojournalism work with X-Pro cameras but better yet a ‘Fujilux’ design with manual clutch focus and larger filter diameter as in the Fujinon XF 14mm, 16mm and 23mm lenses.
  • A 70mm lens for portraiture, in effect the Fujinon answer to Nikon’s justifiably legendary 105mm lenses.
  • Prime and zoom lenses better suited for video with radically improved autofocus and manual clutch focus: right now there are only three MCF primes and very few lenses that perform acceptably for video production, shocking given Fujifilm’s reputation for fine-quality cinema and broadcast lenses for other mounts.
  • A fast aperture, superwide-to-standard zoom lens for video production that learns lessons from Panasonic’s Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 Aspheric zoom, Sigma’s 18-35mm f/1.8 DC HSM Art zoom lens and the recently announced Olympus M. Zuiko Digital ED 8-25mm f/4.0 Pro.
  • A serious commitment to upgrading all the older Fujinon prime and zoom lenses to meet contemporary stills and video needs: lenses remain their largest weak point.

Here is what I want to see in Fujifilm’s GFX-Series cameras:

  • An affordable medium format camera for portraiture, documentary and photojournalism, and architectural photography.

Links

Imaging Resource: Olympus Tokyo Executive Interview: A (little) more insight on the sale of the Olympus Imaging Division

https://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2020/07/17/olympus-interview-more-insight-on-imaging-division-sale

“… Ayataka Kiyomiya, Olympus Imaging Division (AK): First of all, I want to be clear that there is no plan to withdraw from the imaging business with this transfer. We will continue to develop high-quality camera systems which offer unique values. Also, there are no plans to change our new product launch plans in 2020 due to the transfer. The development of 150-400mm PRO is well underway so please stay tuned for exciting news.”

DE: Looking beyond 2020, what will be the fate of other products that are in earlier phases of development? How long will the product lines stay “fresh”, with regular releases, based on what Olympus already has under development?

AK: We will continue to focus on the high-end market and, in the ILC product lineup, we will strengthen mid to high-end cameras and lenses. We have no plans to reduce the number of models unless there are strategic reasons to change the product line-up….”

olympus_m-zuiko_pro_collection_2017_1024px_80pc
The Olympus M.Zuiko Pro professional prime and zoom lens collection as of late 2017, all with manual clutch focus, invaluable for fast, accurate and repeatable manual focusing as well as linear focus-by-wire and autofocus. Image courtesy of Olympus Global.

Commentary

olympus_lens_roadmap_july2020_01_4000px
Olympus lens roadmap of July 2020. Image courtesy of Olympus Global.
leica_summilux+_lineup_21-90mm_square_1920px_80pc
Leica worked out the best prime lens focal length line-up for documentary photography and photojournalism in 35mm years ago and it remains the benchmark and role model for other lens makers to this very day. The only focal length missing from this lens collection is 40mm, which Leica made for the Leica CL rangefinder camera which was later taken over by Minolta as the Minolta CLE with 40mm standard lens as well as a 28mm and 90mm lens. Too many contemporary lens makers leave out 28mm and 75mm lenses and their equivalents for other sensor formats. Why? Both these focal lengths are the most essential for documentary photography and photojournalism.

As one would assume from the sale by a company like Olympus of a whole division to a new owner, little is given away in this interview and it will take some time to begin to understand where Olympus’s excellent Micro Four Thirds cameras and lenses are going and whether the format will vanish altogether.

If I had the means and it was guaranteed that M43 would continue as a sensor format for professional-quality stills and video production then I would invest in more Olympus M. Zuiko Pro prime and zoom lenses.

I have been looking forward to the arrival of a much-needed lens, the hopefully still coming Olympus M. Zuiko Digital ED 8-25mm f/4.0 Pro, to fill a yawning gap in superwide-to-standard zoom lenses for documentary photography and video production.

I admire the design philosophy and manufacturing quality of Olympus’ M. Zuiko Pro lenses even though they lack the clicking/de-clicked aperture rings that are so invaluable for video production and hope that other lens makers learn lessons from them.

My Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 Pro wide-to-portrait-length zoom lens remains my most-used lens of all, especially set at 14mm and 37.5mm focal lengths.

If only Olympus or rather JIP would make f/1.2 M.Zuiko Pro prime lenses in the M43 equivalent of those two 35mm sensor classic focal lengths and documentary standards, the 28mm and 75mm!

Micro Four Thirds remains an excellent format for intense and immersive documentary photography, photojournalism and handheld video production and it would be a damned shame if it disappears.

Links

Photographer and Photography Teacher Grant Scott’s UN of Photography is a Must-Read, and His Book “New Ways of Seeing” Will Be Too

Grant Scott, by Matthew Halstead. Permission to publish this link has been sought and I am awaiting response.

When I was living and working in the United Kingdom I was located near the centre of a world of photographic creativity, photography education and commissioning photography the like of which I have never seen in Australia and most likely never will. 

I was constantly exposed to creators, critics, educators, publishers, thinkers and innovators whose activities made me feel alive and excited about photography itself as well as its associated fields of cinematography, design, publishing and exhibiting. 

I did not meet art director, editor, educator, moviemaker, photographer, podcaster and writer Grant Scott back then and I would have loved to have known him, but at least I have easy access to his insight and knowledge via his The United Nations of Photography website and the now three three books he has written. 

Grant Scott’s latest book is ‘New Ways of Seeing: The Democratic Language of Photography’, to be released on the 28th of November 2019, and I am very much looking forward to it.

Those born since the digital revolution, seem to have the hardest time re-imagining the role of photography in the world today. Thinking of photography as a visual language is the approach this book adopts to addresses this challenge.

Considering photography in this way develops the metaphor of ‘learning a language’ when attempting to explain what photography can be, and what it can give a student in transferable creative and life skills. This begins with challenging the pre-conception that successful photography is defined by the successful single image or ‘the good photograph’.

The book emphasises the central role of narrative and visual storytelling through a technique of ‘photosketching’ to develop the building blocks of visual creativity and ultimately to craft successful bodies of photographic work.

New Ways of Seeing explains how to both learn and teach photography as a visual language, appropriate for both professionals and students working today.

When I was thrown into the deep end having to suddenly become a photography teacher while still a student, I had no mentor nor experience of being taught photography and thus no guide as to how to actually do it much less how to do it well.

Instead I cobbled together my own way of teaching based on my own life and experiences, and on my understanding of photography as a visual language, a way of seeing and a documentary medium.

The table of contents of ‘New Ways of Seeing’ is intriguing:

    • Introduction
    • The Narrative Eye
    • 1. How Did We Get Here
    • 2. Speaking in a Digital Environment
    • 3. The Basic Vocabulary of a Visual Language
    • 4. #Photosketching
    • 5. Building the Narrative
    • 6. Developing Fluency
    • 7. Speaking Out

    Meanwhile Grant Scott has made a vast quantity of thought-provoking material available on his The United Nations of Photography website and I highly recommend watching his feature documentary on the late Bill Jay.

I have just enjoyed reading ‘Do Photographers Need a Brief? Was Alexey Brodovitch Right?’ at The United Nations of Photography where Grant writes that “when Brodovitch commissioned photographers he used just two words “Surprise Me!” That was it. No written brief, no visual reference or complicated requirement was placed on the photographer. He trusted the photographer to respond to a situation and gave them space to be themselves. The work that was created was ground breaking and timeless.”.

That is exactly how I commissioned photographers when working in advertising, based on how I would have loved to have been treated as a photographer, and the results spoke for themselves.

Links

  • Bloomsbury Publishing PlcNew Ways of Seeing: The Democratic Language of Photography – “The book emphasises the central role of narrative and visual storytelling through a technique of ‘photosketching’ to develop the building blocks of visual creativity and ultimately to craft successful bodies of photographic work. New Ways of Seeing explains how to both learn and teach photography as a visual language, appropriate for both professionals and students working today.
  • Do Not Bend: The Photographic Life of Bill Jay – feature documentary movie about the life and work of British photography and photography education innovator Bill Jay, made by Grant Scott and colleagues.
  • Grant Scott Photographywebsite – “After fifteen years art directing photography books and magazines such as Elle and Tatler, Grant began to work solely as a photographer for a number of commercial and editorial clients in 2000. His images bring together all of his experience working with some of the greatest photographers of the last century with his graphic and journalistic talents. His aim is to create engaging photographic narratives from every commission. Grant is currently based in the South West of England.”
  • Matthew Halstead Photography – portrait of Grant Scott of The United Nations of Photography.
  • Oxford Brookes Universitywebsite
  • SoundcloudUNofPhoto: A Photographic Life Podcast
  • The United Nations of Photographywebsite
  • WikipediaOxford Brookes University

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

ffoton: Ron McCormick in Conversation with Paul Reas, Cardiff, June 2019 – audio interview

https://www.ffoton.wales/interviews/2019/9/ron-mccormick-1

“Ron McCormick trained as an artist at Liverpool School of Art and the Royal Academy Schools in London before moving across to photography. He played a significant role in the formation and development of photography galleries across the UK in the 1970’s – including Half Moon Gallery in London, Side Gallery in Newcastle upon Tyne and the original Ffotogallery in Cardiff.

Ron taught on the Newport Documentary Photography course alongside David Hurn and established ‘The Newport Survey’ publication that students worked on as part of their studies – produced over a decade in the 1980’s….”

Commentary

ronmccormick71645443_1828229820657087_8677049963420581888_n
Exhibition preview invitation for ‘The Urban Landscape’ by Ron McCormick at Galerie Düsseldorf, Perth Western, Australia in the mid-1980s.

Ron McCormick was a Visiting Fellow in the School of Art and Design at Curtin University in Perth when I was teaching after being a student, all the while engaged in my own efforts to radically reform art and photography education there and in other places in Western Australia.

Ron spent most of his time photographing in the goldfields and other outback locations and three images from those trips are featured in this set of interviews along with his earlier work in the east end of London and south Wales.

Meeting Ron and seeing some of his work led to spending a year in the United Kingdom shortly afterwards, meeting a number of photographers including the great Brian Griffin, stiffening my resolve to continue my reform efforts back in Australia by whatever means possible despite the gatekeepers and power brokers controlling the medium.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

Imaging Resource: Why did Panasonic wait before demolishing the video competition with the S1H? Find out in our interview

https://www.imaging-resource.com/news/2019/09/03/why-did-panasonic-wait-before-demolishing-video-competition-with-s1h

“Last week, Panasonic figuratively blew the doors off its competition in the pro video space with the introduction of the Lumix S1H. It offers truly high-end video capability for pro videographers and cinematographers at an unprecedented price point….

… I had a chance to sit down briefly with Yosuke Yamane, Director of Panasonic Corp.’s Imaging Business Unit, Smart Life Network Business Division, Appliances Company, to ask a few questions related to its development and release….”

zacuto_panasonic_dc-s1h_camera-caged_02_1024px
Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H rigged with Zacuto moviemaking accessories.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links and purchasing through them for our affiliate accounts at Adorama, Alien Skin, B&H Photo Video, SkylumSmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Unititled’.

  • Atomos StoreB&H
  • L-Mount LensesB&H – native mount lenses for Leica, Panasonic and Sigma mirrorless cameras.
  • Panasonic DMW-BGS1 Battery GripB&H
  • Panasonic DMW-BLJ31 Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Battery (7.2V, 3100mAh)B&H
  • Panasonic DMW-RS2 Remote ShutterB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H Mirrorless Digital Camera (Body Only) B&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H Mirrorless Digital Camera Filmmaker’s KitB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix DC-S1H Mirrorless Digital Camera with Camera Cage KitB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix S 24-105mm f/4 Macro O.I.S. LensB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix S PRO 24-70mm f/2.8 LensB&H
  • Panasonic Lumix S PRO 50mm f/1.4 LensB&H
  • Zacuto Camera Cage for Panasonic S1B&H
  • Zacuto StoreB&H

DPReview: CP+ 2019 Panasonic interview: ‘We’re proud of our cameraness’

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/0078977575/cp-2019-panasonic-interview-we-re-proud-of-our-cameraness

“The CP+ 2019 trade show in Yokohama, Japan, gave us the chance to speak to most of the major camera makers. Panasonic put forward an extensive team to discuss the company’s move into the full-frame market….

… it’s clear that Panasonic wants its S1 and S1R to appeal specifically to professional stills photographers. When it comes to video, the company’s plans seem less well-developed. For now, at least, it seems that Panasonic sees the GH series as its main video/stills camera platform.”

Commentary

panasonic_leica_10-25mm_f1.7_zoom_00314329_1920px_80pc
Panasonic Leica DG Vario-Summilux 10-25mm f/1.7 wide angle zoom lens for Micro Four Thirds cameras. This is the very first zoom lens by any maker that provides the most necessary focal lengths for documentary photography and video, and it doubtless will feel right at home on a Lumix GH5, GH5S, G9 and the coming GH6 as well as the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K.

If by “cameraness” Panasonic means that one can pick up a Lumix S1 or S1R, feel at ease with it and start shooting good photographs or movie footage right away, then I agree with the company’s use of that word.

Here is an event where I tried out the S1 and here is the other event where I tried out an S1R, both times shooting decent photographs almost immediately after the most cursory inspection of the cameras’ controls.

Of course, that ease of use is based partly on my years-long familiarity with Panasonic’s Micro Four Thirds Lumix cameras and partly on Panasonic’s even longer history of constantly improving its cameras and lenses all by itself and in collaboration with Leica Camera AG.

Cameras and lenses by both companies share DNA and it was inevitable, in retrospect, that their long partnership would deepen into the L-Mount Alliance, pleasantly drawing lens maker Sigma in to the equation along with its wide range of top-class prime and zoom lenses for cinematography and photography.

When Panasonic staff members asked me for my first impressions of the S1 and S1R at a couple of touch-and-try events in Sydney earlier this year, my first thought was that both would be very usable cameras if I were still working in magazine editorial portrait and documentary photography where 35mm sensors are king.

That is no mean achievement for the first version of any new product range, and I look forward to seeing how Panasonic’s current S-Series cameras and their successors develop.

If I need to get back into 35mm sensor photography and video, I know where to go.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links below and purchasing through them or our affiliate accounts at B&H Photo Video, SmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

  • Panasonic cameras B&H
  • Panasonic lenses B&H

DPReview: CP+ 2019: Sigma interview – ‘Optical design is always a battle with the design constraints’

https://www.dpreview.com/interviews/7487852065/cp-2019-sigma-interview-optical-design-is-always-a-battle-with-the-design-constraints

Last month at the CP+ show in Yokohama we spoke to executives from several major manufacturers, including Sigma. In our conversation with CEO Kazuto Yamaki we discussed his plans for future L-mount lenses (and cameras) and some of the challenges of supporting multiple mounts.

sigma_105mm_f1.4_dg_hsm_art_l-mount_35mm_1024px
Sigma 105mm f/1.4 DG HSM | Art prime lens with L-mount. A brilliant portrait focal length but no equivalent lens currently exists for Micro Four Thirds or Fujifilm APS-C cameras.

Commentary

I am looking forward to seeing and trying Sigma’s Art collection L-mount prime lenses scheduled for release sometime this year and that are adapted from the company’s current DSLR Art collection offerings.

One major bugbear of new mirrorless launches such as those of Fujifilm APS-C and medium cameras, Panasonic’s Lumix S1 and S1R 35mm cameras, and Panasonic’s Micro Four Thirds cameras is the relative paucity of lenses.

Canon took 30 years to come up with its near-complete DSLR lens collection and it may well take Fujifilm, Olympus and Panasonic almost as long to flesh out the many gaps in their lens collections.

Professional photographers and cinematographers rely on the availability of large lens collections for their cameras in a way that amateurs and enthusiasts tend not to, especially when relying on prime lenses for their optimum optical and mechanical quality.

I would love to see Sigma creating lenses for Fujifilm X-mount APS-C cameras given there are so many glaring holes in Fujifilm’s lens lineup, and the same desire applies to professional-quality lenses for use on Blackmagic Design, Olympus and Panasonic M43 cameras.

Panasonic and its L-Mount Alliance partners Leica and Sigma have done well to aim at releasing enough lenses to satisfy those contemplating investing in the L-mount camera system, and it is pleasing to read that Sigma will be working on smaller and more affordable L-mount lenses in due course.

Meanwhile those of use needing focal lengths that Fujifilm does not offer for its X-mount and G-mount cameras may need to bite the bullet and rely on adapted EF-mount lenses instead of the much-preferred native X-mount and G-mount alternatives that simply do not exist yet.

I am still hoping for a professional-quality alternative to Fujifilm’s too-quirky, too-slow Fujinon XF 18mm f/2.0 R prime lens with its 35mm sensor equivalent focal length of 28mm, a staple optic for many documentary photographers and photojournalists, me included.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links below and purchasing through them or our affiliate accounts at B&H Photo Video, SmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

  • Sigma LensesB&H

Flash Forward Flash Back: Female Dynamics: The Presence of Women in Commercial Photography

http://flashforwardflashback.com/female-dynamics/

“As the #MeToo movement as shown, no industry sector is immune from the throes of gender inequity. In editorial and commercial photography, men still largely outnumber women, despite the fact that much of advertising and is geared towards a more feminine audience. However, the status quo may not endure much longer; photographers, producers and creative directors are fighting for change, either through personal endeavours or collective undertakings. Five photographers and art producers, in discussion with Heather Morton, explain why and how….”

Cover photo of Laurie Metcalf, Glenda Jackson, and Alison Pill by Mackenzie Stroh.

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on the links for and purchasing through our affiliate accounts at B&H Photo Video, SmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.

Design Your Life: Episode 011 with the Douglas Brothers [Podcast]

http://designyourlife.com.au/podcast/ep011-vince-frosts-design-your-life-with-the-douglas-brothers/

“British photographer/director siblings Andrew and Stuart Douglas are renowned creatives, known primarily for their rebellious approach to photography and film direction.

Having grown up in Southend Essex and later, London, the pair’s legacy began in the midst of the London punk movement, where they used their “incorrect” style to snap some of the world’s most iconic figures during their youth, including Richard Gere, Morrissey, Timothy Roth and Tilda Swinton.

Since then, their work has evolved and continued to disrupt the creative and commercial worlds alike, with their left-of-centre work for Adidas, Coco Cola and Hollywood feature-length films.

In this episode, Andrew and Stuart share their personal and professional stories – which are often one in the same.

They recount their origins, moving from stills to videos, how working with your brother can simultaneously result in your best work and decade-long feuds, and ultimately how they “find wellness while keeping the hamster-wheel going.” …”

Daniel Day Lewis, copyright The Douglas Brothers. This was apparently their breakthrough image, the one that established their style, and it was made for US start-up magazine ‘Mirabella’. As ‘Mirabella’ publisher Julie Lewit Nirenberg said after the magazine’s demise in the year 2000, “It had such amazing potential. There was a really wonderful vision behind that magazine.” Been there, done that, saw the same kind of thing occur with ‘not only Black+White’. “It was such a promising magazine.”

Commentary

the_douglas_brothers_leibovitz_gap_1920px
The Douglas Brothers for the Gap ‘Individuals of Style’ advertising campaign, photographed in the early 1990s by Annie Leibovitz. Image kindly supplied by the inimitable Dave Dye, formerly of The Leagas Delaney Partnership.

Kudos to Australia-based strategic designer Vince Frost of Frost* collective for recording this podcast with The Douglas Brothers, Andrew and Stuart.

Whether they realized it or not, the Douglas Brothers played an instrumental role in my life when they recommended me to their apparently one and only advertising agency client at the time, the brilliant copywriter Tim Delaney of the then Leagas Delaney Partnership, on the basis of my having come up with the idea of ‘not only Black+White’ magazine.

I had travelled to the UK as the magazine’s European Contributing Editor several years after its founding in order to meet some of the great photographers I had been working on articles with remotely, via telephone, in those days before everyone used email, chat and the World Wide Web as they do now.

I was rewarded with considerable time spent face-to-face with many of them, met plenty more of them and better yet experienced an acceptance and a respect from all entirely unknown to me back in Australia before or since.

My experience with The Douglas Brothers was a standout, and that is saying something.

Their work, their experiences and backgrounds had some key similarities to my own, enough to amply validate a saying I had long shared with my photography students over the years before leaving Western Australia, “Be yourself, only, more so”.

the_douglas_brothers_selfportrait_1920px
Self-portrait © by The Douglas Brothers.

The Douglas Brothers’ approach to portrait photography came about through the same lack of time allocated with their subjects, lack of funds available for the best and most versatile equipment and back then a lack of recognition from potential clients able to grant them real money for their work.

That recognition was about to come, though, due to the way that photographers overseas were not locked into career-limiting labels like magazine photographer or newspaper photographer as apparently occurs here in Australia still.

At the time I met them, The Douglas Brothers had begun producing longer-form television commercials, evolving beyond the 10-second spots with which they broke into directing, their TV work possessing as much the unique Douglas Brothers stamp as their photographs.

They truly were being themselves, only, more so, a lesson that should have been well-heeded by the students  mentioned in a comment made by Stuart Douglas in an article for advertising industry bible Campaign:

On their photographic style: ‘We used to see students’ photography portfolios with work that identically copied ours, only it was better. We never knew how to take this,’ Stuart comments.

During the time I worked at The Leagas Delaney Partnership, now simply named Leagas Delaney, I encountered quite a few young photographers toting portfolios of work copying that of their idols though The Douglas Brothers did not count among them.

My advice to those fresh young wannabes?

“Be yourself, only, more so.”

Links

Help support ‘Untitled’

Clicking on and purchasing through our affiliate accounts at B&H Photo Video, SmallRig or Think Tank Photo helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled’.