Italian-Australian Cinematographer/Director Dante Cecchin Creates Bolidism-Inspired LockCircle HiPock Cage System for Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K

One camera cage and accessories maker that appears not to receive the press coverage it deserves is LockCircle, a brand of the Brain Emo company based in Lombardy near Lake Como

LockCircle is the only video accessories maker with its origins in Australia, specifically Broken Hill, thanks to Italian-Australian cinematographer/director Dante Cecchin, but the brand is sadly not represented in this country through an importer/distributor or resellers

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LockCircle HiPock, “The Pocket 4K Camera Cage”, designed by Dante Cecchin for the Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 4K.

Meanwhile LockCircle’s products are clearly well regarded enough to be represented in other countries by respected resellers including AbelCine, B&H, mtf, P+S Technik, The Flash Centre and Vocas.

Mr Cecchin’s product design inspirations include the Bolidist Movement pioneered by Italian designer Massimo Iosa Ghini, who characterizes Boldism as “a way of narrating the transition from materialety to drawing things in which the visual and media aspect prevails with respect to the object’s functional purpose”.

Mr Ghini was involved with the Memphis Group of architects and designers during the 1980s, and perhaps the many highly coloured products Memphis members designed may have influenced LockCircle’s product materials and coatings such as the bronze, grey and black anodized surfaces of the three HiPock elements and cages and the rarer, more wildly coloured limited editions and new product colour-ways sometimes seen on LockCircle’s Facebook page.

Special anodization colours and surface finishes

Mr Cecchin’s LockCircle has been one of the first camera cage makers off the mark to come up with accessories for the soon-to-be-released Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K and has come up with three different cages or cage-like devices – Minimal Plate, Essential Plate and System Cage, all under the product name of HiPock.

As with his other camera cages, HiPock integrates intimately with LockCircle’s and camera accessories including MicroMega rigging, RodRocket titanium rods and rails, NoLux “photon trap” technology matte box system, MatBox professional matter box system, LockCircle ultra-secure camera body caps, LockPort camera cable savers, Prime Circle cinema lenses and filters and the Pro M.35 System of accessories for adapting stills photography lenses to use in cinematography.

The breadth and depth of LockCircle’s product system appears to obviate the need to ever go outside it in fully equipping many popular hybrid mirrorless cameras for professional video production.

LockCircle HiPock 4K camera cage for Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K

Due to LockCircle being unrepresented in Australia I have not had the pleasure of seeing and trying any of its products in real life and neither do I know anyone here who owns and uses them, but I certainly hope to remedy that lack some day.

Perhaps Mr Cecchin may be persuaded to pay his birth country a visit to show off his products and share his clearly not inconsiderable achievements.

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Image Credits

Header image concept and hack by Carmel D. Morris.

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Blackmagic Design’s Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K aka BMPCC 4K.

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The Best HDR Image Editor There is, Skylum’s Aurora HDR 2019, is Available for Pre-Order until October 4, with Discounts

Towards the end of each photography editing software maker Skylum, formerly Macphun, announces then releases the annual major update to its two multiple award-winning flagship products, Aurora HDR and Luminar, and both are made available at pre-order discount for a certain period from announcement to the actual release date. 

Right now it is Aurora HDR’s turn, about to be updated to Aurora HDR 2019, with discounts applying until October 4 2018, and the many new additions and improvements in this version make it an absolute must-have update in my humble opinion. 

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Skylum Aurora HDR 2019, with this version blessed with more smart enhancements than ever before as well as a good list of other new features and improvements.

I have dipped my toes in and out of the high dynamic range aka HDR realm for some years at least since Adobe added HDR capability to Photoshop, trying a range of HDR software whether in the form of plug-ins or standalone applications, but none really caught my attention nor got me excited by the possibilities of this form of image creation and editing until Aurora first made its appearance.

Over the years since then the Skylum team has steadily improved Aurora as well all the rest of its software with concepts and features very different from what those usually found in more conventional image editing software made by more conventional image software companies.

One of those unconventional concepts involves features that appear to derive from a side project, Photolemur, described as “the world’s first fully automated photo enhance that makes all your images great automatically with the help of Artificial Intelligence”.

The products of Photolemur’s AI advances started to find their way into Aurora HDR and Luminar a versions or two ago and, with Aurora HDR 2019’s software engine being radically updated to the brand new Quantum HDR Engine and with a number of AI and Smart features appearing in both flagship applications.

I suspect the AI integration in both will continue and look forward to seeing what will appear in Luminar 2019 in the coming months.

Skylum’s modus operandi has been to create standalone versions of its software that can also operate as plug-ins to popular host applications such as Adobe Photoshop and Adobe Photoshop Elements, and more recently to each other with, for example, Aurora HDR 2019 being able to call on Luminar and Photolemur as well as a long list other popular Photoshop plug-ins.

My personal MO when processing HDR images is to do the fundamental HDR tone mapping and basic editing in Aurora then pass the image on to Luminar directly or oftentimes export as a TIFF file with a detour through DxO ViewPoint for powerful automatic optical corrections based on my raw files’ EXIF data and sometimes though DxO FilmPack or Alien Skin Exposure as well for each application’s excellent simulations for classic and quirky analog films and printing processes.

With the addition of Look Up Tables aka LUT support in Aurora HDR 2019 as previously occurred in Luminar, I suspect I will doing less of this detouring with the benefit of applying items from an extensive LUT collection acquired over many years shooting video.

A number of those LUTs are derived from scans of classic, now often sadly discontinued, colour and monochrome movie film stocks and printing films or are based on feature film colour grading looks based on analog films, with one of the most recent such releases being Digital Film Stock aka DFS by LookLabs.

There is a host of similar LUT collections available on the Web for free or very reasonable prices given their quality and if you are new to the world of LUTs I recommend searching and trying to see what LUTs can do with the benefit of Aurora HDR 2019’s new LUT Mapping tool.

Screenshots, Aurora HDR 2019 user interface

The new and improved features in Aurora HDR 2019

User Interface / Performance

  • Tone-mapping technology for bracketed images with the Quantum HDR Engine.
  • Tone-mapping technology for single images with the Quantum HDR Engine.

Editing

  • HDR Smart Structure for realistic and artifact-free structure.
  • All new Aurora HDR Looks to enhance and stylize images.
  • LUT Mapping filter for creative color and tone adjustments.
  • Eleven integrated LUTs to use with the LUT Mapping filter.
  • HDR Details Boost filter that allows for high-resolution tuning while adjusting – improved.
  • Adjustable Gradient filter with new controls for Shadows and Highlights– improved.

Open / Plugin / Export

  • Photoshop plugins support.
  • Photolemur plugin support.
  • Plugins menu for both Mac® and Windows® users
.

A quick tryout, resurrecting ghosts

Unlike most of the photographers who rely on HDR, I use this style of photography not so much for landscapes, cityscapes, architecture or interiors but for portraits, product shots and stills for use in videos often for use with the Ken Burns effect.

For portraits and product shots in particular, most often shot with a mixture of natural and artificial light and increasingly with rather challenging natural light conditions, the HDR plus Aurora HDR combo results in images where textures acquire a hyperrealism that enhances the feeling of actually being in front of that person or those objects.

But I digress.

The 3-bracket HDR image above is one of my less frequently shot scenic photographs and my rather unsophisticated quick and dirty edit in Aurora HDR 2019 in the middle shows just how far Skylum’s software engineers have come with their Quantum HDR Engine and its radically improved processing quality and speed.

Instead of needing a fair bit of work to get a typical HDR image natural looking, Aurora HDR 2019 creates a very realistic tone mapping rendering from the word go, then allows you to choose from a large and growing selection of naturalistic or highly creative presets, or even more image editing controls than in previous versions of Aurora.

From the evidence of the list above of new and improved features in Aurora HDR 2019, and the results of my quick and dirty tryout scene, I will be rethinking my use of HDR imaging and especially how I will be processing future HDR images. 

Reservations that I used to have about HDR due to haloing and processing speed have now gone and I am looking forward to counting on HDR and Aurora HDR 2019 far more than I ever have before.

Portraiture tryout, 7 brackets, straight tone mapping and minimal processing

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Expressing exhaustion and resignation via Aurora HDR 2019 and a film emulation LUT.

A friend I have often used as a test subject dropped by and I decided to try out Aurora HDR 2019 as a portrait processing toolset.

This is the result, above, after minimal processing entirely in Aurora HDR 2019.

During my editorial photography career in the analog era, I specialized in making emotive close-up portraits and information-packed environmental portraits for magazines and newspaper colour supplements, using colour transparency films, Polaroid Type 55 instant positive/negative film and Kodak Tri-X using sheet film and 120 roll film cameras of various types.

That career was interrupted at its height due to succumbing to photochemical allergies followed by conceiving and cofounding “not only Black+White” magazine, a project that helped further my longtime ambitions to help bring about positive change in how photography was understood and used as a means of communication and as an art form in Australia.

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The light in the café where this was shot is amongst the worst that I have shot in over the years and previous attempts using earlier versions of Aurora HDR have been disappointing. This attempt processed with Aurora HDR 2019 is much better. HDR portraiture benefits from expressive lighting, whether natural or artificial, rather than this sort of dull overhead illumination.

My portraiture practice was intimately shaped by the cameras, lenses, films and processing and printing materials and methods of the time.

I carted my 4″x5″ sheet film camera with a medium wide and a medium long lens, sheet film and 120 roll film holders, Broncolor 3-light electronic flash kit, tripod and light stands, with my two Leica M-4P rangefinder cameras and lenses as backups, around the city and suburbs on assignment, photographing creative people, chefs, actors, celebrities and businessmen.

It was fun while it lasted and I used it as an opportunity to introduce my clients to new ways of processing, printing and reproducing my work all the better to communicate the emotions I wanted readers to experience when looking at my photographs in those magazines.

I have long wanted to get back to those forms of photography but this time unencumbered by all that gear, stripping my means of production back to just me, a handheld camera and uncomplicated but expressive processing methods.

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On a day of smokey sunlight due to burning off in the local national park.

Will Aurora HDR 2019 allow me to do that?

I hope so, based on the results of this quick and dirty test above.

Time to take a good, hard look at the current state of the magazine editorial photography landscape here in Australia now?

Definitely time to build a new portrait portfolio, and Aurora HDR 2019 may well be an important factor in that.

One of my aims in portraiture was and is to create the impression in the viewer’s mind that they are in the same room as the subject.

High dynamic range photography appears to assist in helping form that impression, though I have much to try and much to learn about how and why, and how to get the best out of it for portraiture.

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Is the Fujifilm X-T3 the Powerhouse Flagship APS-C/Super 35 DSLR-Style Mirrorless Hybrid Video and Stills Non-IBIS Camera We Have Been Waiting For?

Fujifilm has announced that it will launch the Fujifilm X-T3 “as the latest model in the X Series known for superior image quality with proprietary color reproduction technology. The camera will be launched on September 20, 2018” five days before photokina 2018 commences in Köln on September 25.  

The X-T3 has delivered more sophisticated new features and improvements than I expected when the camera was first rumoured and I am studying its specifications list, hands-on articles and videos with a great deal of interest right now. 

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Fujifilm X-T3 with Fujifilm VG-XT3 Vertical Battery Grip and Fujinon XF 18-55mm f/2.8-4.0 R LM OIS kit zoom lens.

Commentary

The Fujifilm X-T3 is the first Fujifilm DSLR-style camera I would consider using in serious video production given its top notch video features and now that it has exposure zebras! Exposure zebras… YAY!!!

For me, Fujifilm’s most archetypal professional flagship cameras remain the X-Pro digital rangefinders given their evolution of the groundbreaking fixed lens X100 into interchangeable lens territory, and my APS-C format work in photography will centre on X-Pro cameras so long as Fujifilm continues to make them.

I would hate to see Fujifilm follow Panasonic’s recent decision to de-professionalize its Lumix GX rangefinder-style camera range into enthusiast-level gear intended for street photographers as the latter has done with the disappointing Lumix DC-GX9.

Rangefinder and rangefinder-style cameras in all sensor formats are the perfect fit for my way of seeing and photographing, both having evolved through many years of relying on rangefinder-equipped analog film cameras in all formats from 35mm roll film through to 4″x5″ sheet film.

SLR and DSLR cameras have always been secondary camera types for me, involving a very different way of seeing and photographing, one more akin to staring at a mirror into near-flat space rather then peering through a window at objects arrayed left to right, near to far and top to bottom of frame in deep space.

Fujifilm’s X-Pro line, most recently represented by the X-Pro2, is essentially three cameras in one – an optical viewfinder camera, an electronic viewfinder camera and a small view camera via its LCD monitor – and remain the most versatile and personally satisfying solution for documentary photography with focal lengths from 18mm through to 56mm.

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Contax S2 35mm single lens reflex camera which was fully mechanical, manually focused, manually-operated, had a spotmeter and used the Contax/Yashica bayonet mount in order to accept Carl Zeiss T* lenses. It was made by Kyocera, was introduced in 1992 and discontinued in 2000. I am always reminded of Contax SLRs when looking at Fujifilm’s X-T cameras. Image courtesy of Japan Camera Hunter.

DSLR-style cameras, on the other hand, are the electronic viewfinder-equipped descendants of optical viewfinder-equipped SLR cameras – two cameras in one through the benefit of their view camera-like LCD monitors.

DSLR-style cameras support my reliance on rangefinder and rangefinder-style cameras through being better suited to wider focal lengths than 18mm and longer lengths than 56mm.

They are also excellent cameras for more technical work such as architectural photography and product photography.

And now, with Fujifilm’s announcement of the X-T3, professional video production too.

Fujifilm began slowly but surely working on improving its cameras’ video functionality since customer requests to do so started flowing in to the company since the release of the X100.

As a documentary storyteller, I must always be equipped to best handle whatever situation I may find myself in, whether it demands photographs or video footage.

As a shoulder bag or backpack equipped solo operator, I can only carry so much gear and carrying two different cameras systems, one best for video and one best for stills, can be a bridge too far.

One camera system that can do both well enough is the key and, sadly, despite a number of Fujifilm kaizen firmware updates for the X-Pro2, its support for video remains problematic due to its lack of the ability to allow customized video settings such as noise reduction, highlight tone, shadow tone, color and sharpness.

The X-Pro2’s electronic viewfinder is also something of a disappointment when compared to those in the X-T1, X-T2 and the two Panasonic M43 cameras I have for documentary video production.

I need a second Fujifilm camera for my customary two-camera, two-lens documentary photography methodology, and at least one of those must produce good quality video.

With no rumors about the X-Pro3 still, I hope that we are not to assume the worst about the continuation of the X-Pro flagship line.

I have been hoping that the X-Pro3 will correct what is lacking in the otherwise excellent X-Pro2, namely its video functionality and most especially its EVF, so have been wondering if I should pay attention to the larger X-H flagship range or the smaller, sexier X-T range instead.

First glance at the X-T3’s specifications makes me think that it may prove a good solution should I be unable to wait for the X-Pro3’s arrival or if I must eventually cope with a possible tragic demise of the X-Pro range some day.

DSLR-style cameras can never replace rangefinder and rangefinder-style cameras due to their very different natures, but they can be excellent complements to each other.

Fujifilm X-T3 camera body, kit lens and vertical battery grip

Some accessories for the Fujifilm X-T3

Photographs of other Fujifilm and third party accessories for the X-T3 are currently unavailable, but we will place them here when they appear.

It appears that X-T3 review loaners may begin to make their appearance in Australia in October or November of this year.

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Fujifilm Wide Eyecup EC-XH W, a great choice when shooting video with the Fujifilm X-T3, especially when used in conjunction with a synthetic chamois eye cushion by Bluestar.

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fcp.co: Version Control and Collaborative Final Cut Pro X Libraries Stored in the Cloud with PostLab

http://www.fcp.co/final-cut-pro/news/2106-version-control-and-collaborative-final-cut-pro-x-libraries-stored-in-the-cloud-with-postlab

“… Final Cut Pro X is very good at certain things. Unfortunately Apple hasn’t yet cracked collaborative workflow and sharing Libraries between editors can be clunky.

Jasper Siegers at broadcaster EO in the Netherlands has been working on a project that allows all of its FCPX editors to collaborate by enabling version control. The free app is called PostLab and is available for download from the PostLab website.…”

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Apple Final Cut Pro X on Apple 27″ iMac Pro with Retina 5K Display (Late 2017)

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techradar: Landmark cameras: Panasonic Lumix G1

https://www.techradar.com/news/landmark-cameras-panasonic-lumix-g1

“Panasonic has now made more Micro Four Thirds mirrorless camera models that we can count, but the one that started it all of was the Lumix DMC-G1 back in 2008.

We take mirrorless cameras for granted now, but this was a major technological leap back then, when DSLRs ruled the earth and digital electronic viewfinders had so far only been seen in the compact camera market. …”

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-G1 Micro Four Thirds camera with Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-45mm f/3.5-5.6 Aspheric Mega OIS zoom lens.

Panasonic Lumix DMC-G1

Commentary

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Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH1 with Panasonic Lumix G Vario 14-140mm f/3.5-5.6 Aspheric Power OIS zoom lens, the videocentric counterpart to Panasonic’s Lumix DMC-G1, introduced less than a year later.

In 2008, the year that Panasonic released the Lumix DMC-G1, the very first Micro Four Thirds mirrorless camera, was also the year that Canon released the Canon EOS 5D Mark II and stills photographer turned director/cinematographer Vincent Laforet borrowed a prototype to produce Reverie, the first 1080p experimental short moving picture to be made with a stills camera.

Amidst all the hullaballoo about the start of the DSLR moviemaking revolution, the even more exciting news about Panasonic’s G1 still camera and shortly afterwards the more videocentric Lumix DMC-GH1 was largely lost here.

Had I known about the G1 and GH1, had I seen either in a local professional camera store, chances are that I would have chosen them instead of the Canon EOS 5D Mark II and my life and career would have taken a very different direction.

The release of the Lumix DMC-GH1 in 2019 shortly followed by the Lumix DMC-GH2 signalled an even more significant advance in digital moviemaking, the mirrorless moviemaking revolution that will long outlive its DSLR counterpart as mirrorless cameras continue to gain ascendancy.

Then the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH2, tiny stills and 1080i video production powerhouse, appears in 2010…

… but I never encountered it in any of my forays into the CBD and suburbs where professional suppliers were located.

A senior staff member at one such supplier, now closed down along with the rest of its peers in this city, told me that certain hardware importers/distributers made undue demands on them that they must stock complete ranges of their products at all price points regardless of whether the supplier was professional-only and thus only interested in flagship cameras like the Panasonic Lumix DMC-GH2.

Several industry insiders pointed to the film schools and their fealty to high end hardware and software at the expense of teaching with gear affordable for the vast majority of their students and the self-funded independent moviemakers they may well have become had they managed to stay in the industry.

Things like this remind me of why I continue to write what I can here, trying to cut through the deadening veil of camera maker fanboyism, in the hopes that others will not have to experience what I have been forced to go through.

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Is Samsung still the one to emulate in mirrorless hybrid camera hardware/software design and engineering?

Photokina 2018 is approaching and with it come announcements and rumours of marvellous new mirrorless hybrid cameras and lenses in sensor sizes including 35mm, APS-C, Medium Format and Micro Four Thirds. 

Yet I cannot help but think back to the once great white hope of mirrorless for stills and video, the Samsung NX1 and its close companions numbering amongst them the Samsung NX30, the Samsung Galaxy NX and the Samsung NX500, and wonder if any other camera maker has yet learned the lessons that these amazing cameras have to teach them. 

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Samsung NX1 APS-C/Super 35 digital hybrid mirrorless camera with Samsung Premium S 50-150mm f/2.8 ED OIS zoom lens.

I have never had the pleasure of using any Samsung camera due to their poor to nonexistent distribution here before Samsung’s camera and lens division was tragically axed , but I had an all-too-brief play with a colleague’s Samsung NX1 some time ago and that was enough to be amazed.

More recently mention of the Samsung NX30 appeared on a mirrorless rumours website, I googled to and was stunned and amazed to see the camera had a tilting electronic viewfinder and fully articulated monitor, two of the most essential , in my option, features for any serious stills and video hybrid camera.

My beloved Panasonic Lumix DMC-GX8 has both and its is a potent combination for stealthy and efficiently shooting stills or video, caged or uncaged, heavily rigged or camera-and-lens only.

The Samsung NX1 had superb ergonomics and a still unsurpassed menu design, and I suspect it worked even better in the hand when rigged with its vertical battery grip and Premium S lenses.

Imagine if Samsung had stayed in the camera and lens business, constantly innovating and showing the more established players in the market how it should be done.

Imagine what contemporary Samsung rangefinder-style and DSLR-style hybrid mirrorless APS-C and larger sensor equipped cameras might be like, with tilting EVFs, fully articulated AMOLED monitors on the mid-to upper level cameras or tilting AMOLED monitors on the lower-end models, excellent hardware ergonomics and software user interface design, 6K read-out, 1080p at 120 frames per second, HEVC H.265 codecs for 4K and 8K video, and more.

Imagine if Blackmagic Design, Canon, Fujifilm, Leica, Nikon, Olympus, Panasonic, Ricoh/Pentax and Sony learned even a fraction of the lessons Samsung’s genius designers and engineers had to teach them.

Samsung NX1

The Samsung NX1 was so far ahead of its time that many potential users complained bitterly about its then poorly supported HEVC video codec and H.265 video file type, but not long after its release computer makers began adding support and now it is standard on contemporary computers and 4K television sets.

Many professional moviemakers continue to rely on their Samsung NX1 cameras and native and adapted lenses, and anticipate the day when they start breaking down with dread.

Samsung NX30

The Samsung NX30 was aimed more at stills photographers than moviemakers, with its 1080p video and 20MP sensor, but it has two features I consider essential to hybrid mirrorless photography and cinematography, a tilting electronic viewfinder aka EVF and a fully articulated monitor.

Samsung Galaxy NX

The Samsung Galaxy NX was a bold experiment in pushing camera menu systems way beyond still common lists of text links into an Android-based fully graphic icon-based system.

Samsung NX500

The Samsung NX500 was minus an EVF but partially made top for that absence with a tilting monitor.

Apparently many photographers and cinematographers adopted the NX500 as a smaller companion camera to their Samsung NX1s.

Samsung lenses

It was often said of Samsung’s cameras that there were not enough lenses, though the company’s camera division had begun working on its professional-quality Premium S lens range before its was suddenly shut down.

It managed to issue two Premium S lenses, the Samsung Premium S 16-50mm f/2.8 ED OIS and Samsung Premium S 50-150mm f/2.8 ED OIS zoom lens, with other lens designs rumoured to be in the works or about to be released.

Any new mid-level to professional mirrorless camera system should be released alongside at least five top-quality lenses – a wide, medium and telephoto zoom lens trio, and two or three fast, wide aperture prime lenses.

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Blackmagic Design: Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K ‘Balloons’ [Extreme outdoors lighting test, by Andreas Neumann]

“Andreas Neumann talks about using the new Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K for the first time. ‘Balloons’ is Andreas’ extreme lighting test as he constantly shoots directly into the sun, wide open. ‘Balloons’ documents the camera’s performance from 5am in the morning into the height of the midday sun.

“I shot this test at Temecula in California, shooting from dawn until midday. This was a challenging environment for any camera, because I was constantly shooting into the light, or with the sun directly behind people’s faces. The detail I got was incredible. You can see everything reflecting in my wife’s Chanel glasses. You can actually see reflections off the ground, the balloon above, and the sky in the background. The camera really did capture everything I was seeing. I love shooting directly into the light wide open, and with this camera you could safely do that. I was totally amazed at what the micro four thirds sensor could handle. It seemed like the same quality as the URSA Mini Pro with the full sensor. I was also very surprised at how well the back-screen performed in bright sunlight, where I could truly see every detail.”

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Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K with Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 Pro standard zoom lens and mini-XLR-to-XLR audio cable for attaching XLR microphones, mounted on Benro Aero 4 Video Travel Angel Tripod Kit. Mini-XLR cable is made by Blackmagic Design for their Video Assist monitor/recorder but is also great for connecting XLR microphones to the BMPCC 4K, product code HYPERD/AXLRMINI2.

Commentary

The footage keeps on coming as US moviemaker Andreas Neumann shows off the low-angle, low-level lighting capability of the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K aka BMPCC 4K with this video shot with Rokinon 24, 50 and 80mm cinema prime lenses.

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Image Credits

Header image concept and hack by Carmel D. Morris.

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Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 17mm f/1.2 Pro, Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 25mm f/1.2 Pro and Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 45mm f/1.2 Pro professional prime lenses with manual clutch focusing, brilliant for shooting video or stills where accurate focus is absolutely critical.

Clicking on these affiliate links and purchasing through them helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled: Stories of Creativity, Innovation, Success’.

  • Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 4KB&H
  • Blackmagic Design Mini XLR Cable for Video Assist/4K (Set of 2, 19.5″)B&H
  • Breakthrough PhotographyB&H – the finest brass traction-framed ND, UV and CPL filters as well as the best step-up rings (sadly only sold direct on the company’s own website at present).
  • Chiaro Premium UV Protection FiltersB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 7-14mm f/2.8 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 8mm f/1.8 Fisheye PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4 IS PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 17mm f/1.2 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 25mm f/1.2 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 45mm f/1.2 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 300mm f/4 IS PRO LensB&H
  • Rokinon Cinema Prime LensesB&H

Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K ‘Models Walking at Night’ [Second clip from the BMPCC 4K with skin tones, by John Brawley]

“John Brawley shares his experiences with the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K. ‘Models Walking at Night’ is his second camera test where he was checking out the camera’s higher dynamic range and color accuracy.

“What I wanted to achieve was to test the dynamic range, but to still come up with some really great looking images. Having that higher dynamic range and a high bit depth file, means you have a lot of wriggle-room to correct anything that needs to be balanced. This extra range lets you manage and massage the image to get you into a really nice place. You’re not fighting the codec or the dynamic range of the camera.”

“The Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K gives you a ton of options. If you want to take it warmer, darker or cooler, you now have so much latitude in terms of dynamic range and depth of color. With this camera you just have so much extra choice, because you can take the image whereever you want. And that’s the truly great thing about having such a vibrant and high precision image!”

blackmagic_pocket_cinema_camera_4k_bmpcc4k_04_1024px_60pc
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K with Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 Pro standard zoom lens and mini-XLR-to-XLR audio cable for attaching XLR microphones, mounted on Benro Aero 4 Video Travel Angel Tripod Kit. Mini-XLR cable is made by Blackmagic Design for their Video Assist monitor/recorder but is also great for connecting XLR microphones to the BMPCC 4K, product code HYPERD/AXLRMINI2.

Commentary

This is the second in a series of three videos by Australian Director of Photography John Brawley that explore some of the capabilities of Australian-based Blackmagic Design’s Blackmagic Pockets Cinema Camera 4K, due for release sometime later this year.

Mr Brawley is an exponent of the benefits of shooting video in Micro Four Thirds, and has an extensive collection of Olympus M43 lenses.

In this series of videos, he is using various lenses from the Olympus M.Zuiko Pro collection to great effect, not so hard to do given the manual clutch focus mechanism on these lenses for easier focus pulling and pinpoint manual focus accuracy.

Links

Image Credits

Header image concept and hack by Carmel D. Morris.

Help support ‘Untitled’

Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 17mm f/1.2 Pro, Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 25mm f/1.2 Pro and Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 45mm f/1.2 Pro professional prime lenses with manual clutch focusing, brilliant for shooting video or stills where accurate focus is absolutely critical.

Clicking on these affiliate links and purchasing through them helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled: Stories of Creativity, Innovation, Success’.

  • Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 4KB&H
  • Blackmagic Design Mini XLR Cable for Video Assist/4K (Set of 2, 19.5″)B&H
  • Breakthrough PhotographyB&H – the finest brass traction-framed ND, UV and CPL filters as well as the best step-up rings (sadly only sold direct on the company’s own website at present).
  • Chiaro Premium UV Protection FiltersB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 7-14mm f/2.8 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 8mm f/1.8 Fisheye PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4 IS PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 17mm f/1.2 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 25mm f/1.2 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 45mm f/1.2 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 300mm f/4 IS PRO LensB&H

Blackmagic Design: Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K ‘Models Walking in Daylight’ [First footage from the BMPCC 4K with skin tones, by John Brawley]

“John Brawley talks about the Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K for the first time. ‘Models Walking in Daylight’ is his first camera test where he checked out the camera’s ability to handle different skin tones.

“The whole point to this daylight test was to see how the camera handled skin tones. We were shooting these scenes later in the afternoon, so I was at ISO1000 or 1250, so it was at the lower ISO for this camera. I understand this gives more in dynamic range, so you have a little bit more highlight-headroom there. When I look at those shots now, I am really impressed at how good the dynamic range is. It is great to see all of that detail I was seeing was actually captured in those shots.”

“I don’t think people realize how easy it is to make things look cinematic with Micro Four Thirds! I know that there are a lot of people who like that 35mm full frame look, but it’s still very easy to get images with an out of focus background with the Micro Four Thirds sensor. I found it a great 4K sensor and really good compromise for a small camera that still gets really, really good looking pictures.”

blackmagic_pocket_cinema_camera_4k_bmpcc4k_04_1024px_60pc
Blackmagic Pocket Cinema Camera 4K with Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 Pro standard zoom lens and mini-XLR-to-XLR audio cable for attaching XLR microphones, mounted on Benro Aero 4 Video Travel Angel Tripod Kit. Mini-XLR cable is made by Blackmagic Design for their Video Assist monitor/recorder but is also great for connecting XLR microphones to the BMPCC 4K, product code HYPERD/AXLRMINI2.

Commentary

This is the first in a series of three videos by Australian Director of Photography John Brawley that explore some of the capabilities of Australian-based Blackmagic Design’s Blackmagic Pockets Cinema Camera 4K, due for release sometime later this year.

Mr Brawley is an exponent of the benefits of shooting video in Micro Four Thirds, and has an extensive collection of Olympus M43 lenses.

In this series of videos, he is using various lenses from the Olympus M.Zuiko Pro collection to great effect, not so hard to do given the manual clutch focus mechanism on these lenses for easier focus pulling and pinpoint manual focus accuracy.

Links

Image Credits

Header image concept and hack by Carmel D. Morris.

Help support ‘Untitled’

olympus_m.zuiko_pro_17mm_25mm_45mm_f1.2_primes_hero_1024px_60%
Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 17mm f/1.2 Pro, Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 25mm f/1.2 Pro and Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 45mm f/1.2 Pro professional prime lenses with manual clutch focusing, brilliant for shooting video or stills where accurate focus is absolutely critical.

Clicking on these affiliate links and purchasing through them helps us continue our work for ‘Untitled: Stories of Creativity, Innovation, Success’.

  • Blackmagic Design Pocket Cinema Camera 4KB&H
  • Blackmagic Design Mini XLR Cable for Video Assist/4K (Set of 2, 19.5″)B&H
  • Breakthrough PhotographyB&H – the finest brass traction-framed ND, UV and CPL filters as well as the best step-up rings (sadly only sold direct on the company’s own website at present).
  • Chiaro Premium UV Protection FiltersB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-40mm f/2.8 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 7-14mm f/2.8 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 8mm f/1.8 Fisheye PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 12-100mm f/4 IS PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 17mm f/1.2 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 25mm f/1.2 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 40-150mm f/2.8 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 45mm f/1.2 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 300mm f/4 IS PRO LensB&H