The Fujifilm X-Pro2 Receives Its Long Promised 4K Video Capability at Last, But Is It Everything We’ve Been Hoping For?

Fujifilm released its long-awaited firmware version 4.00 for the X-Pro2 digital rangefinder camera late December 2017, bringing six significant new features to this still revolutionary APS-C/Super 35 interchangeable lens hybrid camera. 

Fujifilm’s X-Pro2 rangefinder camera is available in two versions, basic black or graphite.

Foremost of the new features is the long-promised 4K video mode (minus HDMI out for recording onto external recorders like this made by Atomos), a new autofocus algorithm for tracking subjects in motion, improved radio flash control usability, tethered shooting via USB or Wi-Fi connections, the ability to use the free Fujifilm  X Raw Studio application, and back-up and restoration of camera settings through the free Fujifilm X Acquire application via USB connection to your computer.

I have briefly tried out Fujifilm X Raw Studio and Fujifilm X Acquire and it is particularly good to now be able to save and restore camera settings that often take some time to make in-camera.

The Fujifilm GFX 50S saves and exports photographs as raw, TIFF or JPEG files.

Fujifilm X Raw Studio is interesting in that it processes on-computer raw files via the X-Pro2’s raw conversion engine, permitting them to be exported as JPEGs, a feature I would find much more useful if the X-Pro2 had an option to export as TIFF files as does the Fujifilm GFX 50S medium format mirrorless camera.

I do not currently use electronic flash or radio controllers for flash units so usability improvements are lost on me for the time being.

I use my X-Pro2 in a way not unlike non-digital manually-focussing rangefinder cameras so autofocus and especially AF-C continuous autofocus mode is not something I have used much so far, but I will investigate it when the right subject matter arises.

https://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/1189478-REG/tascam_dr_701d_linear_pcm_recorder.html/BI/20140/KBID/14125/DFF/d10-v21-t1-x685974/SID/EZ
Tascam DR-701D 6-Track Field Recorder with SMPTE Timecode, that can be attached beneath your camera when handheld or on a tripod, for top-quality field audio recording. I have the DR-70D.

Tethered shooting is something I have planned on investigating when I have updated my production gear collection later this year with the addition of one of the coming 2018 Apple 15.4″ MacBook Pro portable computers maxed out for on-location editing and production work, with the addition of some Tether Tools hardware and a stable though portable tripod, perhaps 3 Legged Thing’s Winston.

The brand new feature I am most excited about is the X-Pro2’s ability to shoot 4K video using Fujifilm’s justly famous film simulations modes, coupled with the ability to input audio from a camera-mounted microphone or a below-camera audio recorder like the Tascam DR-70D or DR-701D field recorders.


Seven X-Pro2 film simulations customized by cinematographers and photographers

A while back I decided to explore customized JPEG settings on my X-Pro2 to see what all the fuss was about. I prefer to shoot raw files and process them in a range of raw processors but it is always good to explore the alternatives.

I set up seven customized film simulations based on setting shared by Andrew Reid, Thomas Fitzgerald and Peter Evans, then used them to shoot this test.

Slight differences in exposure aside, all three Acros clips look the same as do both Provia clips.

ProNeg S is the softest and best for grading while Classic Chrome looks good if one needs ungraded but publication-ready footage straight out of camera.

 


Fujifilm’s X-T2 permits full customization of Fujifilm’s famous digital film simulations as do the X-E3 and X-T20 cameras, so why is this crucial moviemaking feature left out of the X-Pro2’s 4K video implementation?

But…

As Fujifilm’s other 4K video-capable cameras like the X-T2 and X-E3 permit customizing their film simulations for video as well as in-camera JPEG creation, I had expected the X-Pro2’s new 4K video feature to work the same way.

It does not.

Instead one can only select a particular film simulation from the X-Pro2’s current fifteen modes and shoot without benefit of tailoring its sharpness, noise reduction, highlight tone, shadow tone or colour to suit.

The camera’s video can often be too sharp, especially when shooting with some of Fujifilm’s excellent top-end prime or zoom lenses and one’s only recourse is to apply plenty of neutral density filtration to the longer focal lengths while opening up the aperture as far as one can go.

Shadow tone, highlight tone and color can be controlled to some degree when grading footage in your non-linear editor or colour grading software, but as with sharpness, noise reduction cannot be controlled in-camera either.

This limits the X-Pro’s video usability and this is deeply disappointing after waiting such a long time for 4K to finally appear after it was promised by Fujifilm staff members who believed it would appear on the X-Pro2 after the release of the X-T2.


A video lens set for prime lens lovers

The best video lenses, in my opinion, have manual clutch focus, a reasonable filter diameter to allow attaching 77mm or 82mm neutral density filters via step-up rings, and are long enough to permit easy access to focussing and aperture rings.

 


Another disappointment is Fujifilm’s seeming ongoing inability, or unwillingness, to add the industry-standard exposure zebras functionality to its cameras including the X-Pro2.

Instead we are given highlight overexposure blinkies, an annoying feature whereby areas of the image that may be overexposed at current settings flash black and white on and off.

If you have selected focus peaking as your focussing aid, the focus peaking lines also flash, an irritating behaviour that started to drive me crazy after a few minutes of use.

I found that resorting to the standard manual focussing aid whereby the point of focus is magnified eliminates the annoying flashing focus peaking but an often crucial fast focussing aid is thereby lost.


Some LookLabs Digital Film Stock (DFS) LUTs applied to X-Pro2 ProNeg S 4K footage

Having been disappointed by the 4K film simulation footage straight out of the camera, I wondered whether applying a creative aka looks LUT might be useful.

LookLabs released its excellent Digital Film Stock (DFS) bundle of nineteen LUTs based on some of the most popular Fuji and Kodak film stocks, many long discontinued, a while back so I applied all of them to a still frame extracted from my ProNeg S footage, with a small selection above.

I will be testing a range of creative aka looks LUTs over the coming weeks in conjunction with colour grading’s standard controls in my current non-linear editor of choice, Final Cut Pro X, as well as CoreMelt’s excellent Chromatic pro-quality colour grading plug-in.


Just in, Leeming LUT One for Fujifilm 402 beta

While writing this article, Paul Leeming of Leeming LUT One and Visceral Psyche Films sent over his version 402 beta of Leeming LUT One camera LUT for Fujifilm cameras, so I applied it and some creative LUTs to some new X-Pro2 4K ProNeg S footage shot in  local café.

Mr Leeming plans on updating his Leeming LUT One for Fujifilm to version 502 with his new methodology to bring it into alignment with Leeming LUT One 502 for Panasonic cameras, sometime later this year.

I will be trying out this current beta on more X-Pro2 4K footage soon and look forward to version 502 in due course.

Further thoughts

A while after the X-Pro2’s release, Canadian Fuji Guy Billy Luong went on record about 4K support on the camera saying that “I’m fighting with Japan for that”.

The year before, Mr Luong stated that the “X-Pro2 is over-engineered” and that “a lot of potential [is] not harnessed yet” with “firmware improvements coming”.

Some of those firmware improvements are here now but some remain missing in action.


A stabilized video lens set for zoom lens lovers


It is hard to believe that the X-Pro2 is not over-engineered enough or not powerful to accept the necessary ability to customize noise reduction, highlight tone, shadow tone, colour and sharpness for shooting video.

Mr Billy Luong, over to you!

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Panasonic Australia: Lumix G9 | How To Set Up the New High-Res Mode

“The LUMIX DC-G9 introduces Panasonic’s new High Resolution Mode. Ideal for landscape, scenery and still-life photography, the high-res mode composes shots from 8 shutter releases to produce 80MP JPEG /RAW images in-camera – a level of resolution generally seen only on medium format cameras that cost many times more than the G9….”

Panasonic Lumix DC-G9, a Micro Four Thirds stills photography hybrid camera with great video capabilities.

Commentary

Kudos to Panasonic Australia for showing us more about the G9’s high resolution mode than many of the YouTube camera superstars have so far.

While the G9 is a remarkable achievement in a (mostly) stills photography camera, its high resolution mode was what caught my eye when it was announced, not least as an alternative to the medium format digital cameras that are beyond my reach or daily needs.

Linhof Master Technika Classic 4″x5″ sheet film view camera, the epitome of large format analog photography cameras that can also shoot digitally with the addition of a digital back.

Medium format digital is the contemporary equivalent of the 120 rollfilm-using analog and sheet film cameras upon which I built my environmental portrait style during my magazine photography career, and I miss their high resolution, storytelling detail and the slow, sure, deliberative approach that the genre and those cameras demand from photographer and subject.

It is the polar opposite to the casual rapid-fire snapshot style of portraiture currently entrenched in the realm of magazine photography and for which DLSR and DSLR-style cameras are popular, yet here is Panasonic bringing a non-DSLR style of photography to its latest DSLR-style camera in the G9.

Pixel-shifting high exposure functionality is not new to Micro Four Thirds digital cameras – Olympus has it on several of its rangefinder-style and DSLR-style cameras while Pentax reportedly first introduced it into its APS-C and 35mm sensor-equipped K Series DSLRs.

For further information on how high res work on the G9, page 197 of Panasonic’s Operating Instructions for advanced features for the Lumix G9 includes this information:

[Picture Size] When the aspect ratio is [4:3]

[XL] (80.5M): 10368×7776
[LL] (40M): 7296×5472
• RAW images are always recorded in the [4:3] (10368k7776) aspect ratio….

[Simul Record Normal Shot]

Saves the first picture if pictures taken before the combining process in addition to a combined picture if [ON] is selected. Pictures will be saved with [Picture Size] set to [L].

[Shutter Delay]

Sets the delay between the time the shutter button is pressed to the time the shutter is released.

[30 SEC]/[15 SEC]/[8 SEC]/[4 SEC]/[2 SEC]/[1 SEC]/[1/2 SEC]/[1/4 SEC]/[1/8 SEC]/[OFF]

Will the high resolution mode come to the successor of Panasonic’s Lumix GX8 rangefinder-style camera, presumably to be named the GX9?

Those shutter delay options are a great solution for the times when you don’t have a remote release handy but given photographers should be carrying a tripod when planning on shooting 40 megapixel or 80 megapixel high resolution images on the G9 they should be carrying one or two remotes as well.

Always best to have spares of all crucial hardware, especially items prone to loss or failure.

So far there has been no news as to whether Panasonic will be releasing a GX9 any time soon but I hope one will be coming sometime this year.

I prefer rangefinder and rangefinder-style cameras for stills photography over DSLR-style cameras due to the way documentary subjects react to them and portrait subjects engage with them, and appreciate the GX series’ tilting electronic viewfinder for its unique waist-level viewing experience.

3 Legged Thing’s Winston carbon fibre tripod is reportedly their most stable tripod made to date.

A high resolution-capable GX9 attached to a sturdy but still portable tripod like 3 Legged Thing’s Winston via the company’s QR11-L L-Bracket for rapid switching between vertical and horizontal orientation, or a QR11-FB of using a G9 with DMW-BGG9 battery grip, might be the way to go when shooting environmental portraits.

The one possible downside to pixel-shifting high-resolution mode that some commentators point out when shooting portraits, subject movement between exposures, is not dissimilar to the one I often encountered when working with available light and medium or large format cameras with slow lenses.

3 Legged Thing’s QR11-LC Universal L-Bracket, soon to be joined by a full-size version designed to hold cameras with battery grips.

The trick is to engage your sitter with the process so deeply that they stay still enough for long exposures, or multiple shots combined into one, concentrating, breathing out, then gazing directly down the barrel of the lens for the duration.

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Nubrella: On Sale for a Limited Time

http://www.nubrella.com/shop/

“The umbrella has been our go-to for rain drop coverage for centuries. We thank you for your service. There’s a new kid in town. Meet Nubrella. Worn back-pack style… it won’t invert and it’s hands-free…rain, wind, snow and sun….”

Nubrella

Commentary

It looks like something out of Blade Runner and Blade Runner 2049 but it is very much a contemporary solution to a problem throughout the ages, how to keep your hands free to do more important things than hold an umbrella steady against the wind or the rain, the sun or the snow.

A Nubrella without or more likely with its matching optional backpack is definitely on my stills and video production gear wishlist – umbrellas and long raincoats fail to liberate both hands to get the best out of shooting in challenging weather.

We might be in the middle of a heatwave right now but February is traditionally the month of relentless heavy rain in Sydney, and I have some outdoors projects scheduled for then and beyond that cannot be put off for another day, or week or two.

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News Shooter: Rotolight NEO 2 – Is the sequel better than the original?

http://www.newsshooter.com/2018/01/15/rotolight-neo-2-is-the-sequel-better-than-the-original/

“Sometimes the sequel fails to live up to the original, so how does Rotolight’s new NEO 2 stack up against its predecessor? On paper the NEO 2 looks to be a significant improvement over the original NEO….”

Rotolight Neo 2 LED Light

Commentary

I have the original Rotolight Neo LED light in a three light kit with barndoors and Chimera softbox, and highly recommend them for use in video production and stills photography, so I look forward to adding a Neo 2 to my kit or replacing all three first version Neos with three version 2 Neo lights.

For applications where the pulpit of the Neo lights is not enough, then I recommend looking at Rotolight’s Anova and Aeos lights.

I am especially impressed by how portable but powerful the Aeos lights are and even one would make an excellent on-location main portrait light, especially with the addition of barndoors and a diffuser.

Also impressive is how Rotolight has added High-Speed Sync with Flash (HSS) capability to the Neo 2 and Aeos LED lights.

Rotolight Neo 2 LED Light with HSS Capability, and Accessories

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Mystery Box: Panasonic GH5S & Shooting HDR10

https://www.mysterybox.us/blog/2018/1/8/panasonic-gh5s-hdr10

“… Whether you’re new to shooting and delivering in HDR, or have been practicing for a while, the Panasonic GH5S with V-Log L enabled provides a fantastic starting point for an all-HDR10 workflow.  From monitoring what you’re shooting in HDR10 to delivering your content through the color grading process, the LUTs and workflow we’ve created will accelerate your ability to leverage HDR10 on nearly any size budget…”

The Panasonic Lumix DC-GH5S Super 16/M43 hybrid video camera.

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Production and equipment rental company Mystery Box, LLC has published a number of articles about aspects of shooting and post-producing HDR video that are useful reading for those needing to dig deep into how to get the best out of it all.

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ProVideo Coalition: Some thoughts on color, brightness, and contrast

https://www.provideocoalition.com/thoughts-color-brightness-contrast/

“I’m not happy with just knowing that colors work together in artistic ways. I want to know why. Here are some thoughts. I’m a strict amateur in the world of color (I’m not a color scientist or an art expert) but I have some thoughts on the matter that I’d like to share, just in case they’re thoughts you haven’t had yet….”

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ProVideo Coalition: Review: The Panasonic AU-EVA1 4K Cine Camera

https://www.provideocoalition.com/review-panasonic-au-eva1-4k-cine-camera

“Panasonic’s $7,345 AU-EVA1 is a Super35mm single-sensor camcorder with a 5.7K Bayer-mask sensor, an EF lens mount, variable frame rates, and 14+ stops of dynamic range, recording on SDXC cards using log, HLG, and standard gamma renderings. Its compact, boxy body with removable rotating side grip is like that of the Sony FS5, but its images, menus, and touchscreen monitor make it feel more like a junior VariCam LT, with maybe a pinch of DVX200 added into the mix….”

The Panasonic AU-EVA1 4K Super 35 cinema camera, raw recording coming soon via external recorder.

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Rigging for the Panasonic AU-EVA1 constructed on SmallRig Basic Accessory Kit for Panasonic EVA1 2099 with a range of other SamllRig accessories.

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Paul Leeming’s Leeming LUT One for the Panasonic GH5 Now at Version 502 for HLG, V-Log L and Cinelike D – UPDATED

Australian cinematographer/director Paul Leeming has issued the version 502 update to his unified corrective LUT (Look Up Table) system Leeming LUT One for the Panasonic Lumix GH5 and its three major video picture profiles, HLG, V-Log L and Cinelike D. 

Australian director/cinematographer Paul Leeming of Leeming LUT One fame with his Panasonic Lumix GH4 rigged for shooting feature films.

The Leeming LUT One system was developed in order to help cinematographers obtain the best image quality from their cameras by providing custom settings and LUTs to maximize dynamic range while minimizing noise and other artefacts such as banding and YUV chroma smearing.

Mr Leeming advises cinematographers to adhere to the expose-to-the-right aka ETTR principle, which he demonstrates in his website.

Still frame of Paul Leeming, shot on Panasonic Lumix GH5 in HLG HDR mode then processed in Blackmagic Design DaVinci Resolve Studio 14 using Leeming LUT One for Panasonic HLG version 501.

He has produced Leeming LUT One custom settings and LUTs for cameras including those made by Canon, DJI, GoPro, JVC, Panasonic, Sony with potential support for cameras made by FujifilmDigital Bolex and Samsung should there be sufficient demand.

Panasonic Lumix GH5 HLG Footage and Leeming LUT One for HLG, Before and After

Still frames from GH5 4K 10-bit 4:2:2 HLG footage exposed using ETTR, the ‘Leeming LUT One – Panasonic HLG v502.cube’ applied followed by ‘Leeming LUT Quickie – Basic Balanced v2.cube’ from ‘Leeming LUT Quickies 1 version 2’.

Mr Leeming will be updating his free ‘Leeming LUT Quickies’ collection soon to reflect the improvements made to the most recent version of Leeming LUT One for Panasonic cameras.

Our recent weather has been heavily hit by the effects of extreme climate change and global warming, and we have experienced few pristine Sydney summer days with their classic cobalt skies for some time now.

With many skies almost becoming high ultra-violet light boxes, the excellent highlight roll-off of the HLG profile in the GH5 is becoming even more important, and Leeming LUT One for HLG does a great job of maintaining the original look and feel of a scene while preserving realistic colour and especially skin colour.

Initial grading as in these still frames provides a good starting point that can be further enhanced with some of the many creative aka looks LUTs or analog film simulation being made available by a range of LUTs makers.

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Image Credits

Header image concept and hack by Carmel D. Morris.

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DPReview: Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 Review

https://www.dpreview.com/reviews/panasonic-lumix-dc-g9

“The Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 is the brand’s highest-end stills-oriented camera, sitting beside the video-oriented Lumix DC-GH5 at the top of the product lineup….

… It seemed for a little while there, the two biggest players in the Micro Four Thirds world were splitting off into their own separate niches with Olympus going after the pro stills crowd by way of the EM-1 series and Panasonic, the pro video crowd with the GH series.

No longer is this the case: the Panasonic G9 looks to take a square shot at the heart of the market Olympus is after with the OM-D E-M1 II….”

Panasonic Lumix DC-G9 camera with Panasonic DMW-BGG9 battery grip and Panasonic Leica DG Elmarit 200mm f/2.8 Power OIS telephoto lens.

Gallery

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