Mirrorless Comparison Compares Olympus M.Zuiko Pro 17mm and 45mm f/1.2 with Olympus M.Zuiko 17mm and 45mm f/1.8 Primes

Longtime popular mirrorless camera website MirrorLesson’s Mirrorless Comparison spinoff has published early but complete comparisons of the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 17mm f/1.2 Pro lens and its Olympus M.Zuiko 17mm f/1.8 predecessor, and the Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 45mm f/1.2 Pro lens and its Olympus M.Zuiko 45mm f/1.8 predecessor. 

The M.Zuiko Pro f/1.2 prime lens triad: Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 17mm f/1.2 Pro, Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 25mm f/1.2 Pro and Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 45mm f/1.2 Pro, all with their focussing rings drawn back to emphasise their manual clutch focus mechanisms.

These sorts of side-by-side tryouts are useful when assembling an optimal set of lenses for any camera system, and are something I would love to do myself with more of an in-the-field as-close-to-real-life-as-possible tryout, less of a techie pixel-peeping and specifications-comparing spiel.

Given my relative lack of access to the range of gear I would want to try out and write about, I am glad that others out there in the northern hemisphere do have access to items of interest, like MirrorLessons’ Wales-based Heather Broster and Mathieu Gasquet, and are great at more technical reviewing.

Olympus M.Zuiko Pro 17mm and 45mm f/1.2 primes and their f/1.8 counterparts

I learned to select camera systems first by the quality of their lenses, second by the functionality of their camera bodies and those principles remain in force despite the digital era’s constantly evolving hardware and software technologies.

Lens choice should be based on genre, camera shape and size, and other shooting stills, video or both.

In my case (mostly) available light documentary, small to medium size mirrorless rangefinder and rangefinder-style cameras when possible, and both video and stills, often in the same project.

I do appreciate the smaller Micro Four Thirds and APS-C lenses, especially the pancake and “Fujicron” lens designs, for allowing me to be discrete and unobtrusive when shooting in public but find manual clutch focus lenses invaluable when shooting video and for critical focus with fast apertures and longer focal lengths.

Most lenses in the Olympus M.Zuiko Pro collection feature filter diameters of 62mm or more, wide focussing rings suitable for follow-focus devices and lens bodies large enough to grip well.

Video brings other lens features into consideration, too, especially when shooting in the great outdoors under bright sunlight or with fast sensors of 400 ISO and over.

That is when you need to add neutral density filters to your kit as a top quality variable ND filter, or a set of fixed ND filters, or both, along with a set of aluminium or better yet brass step-up rings.

Most professionals standardize on 77mm or 82mm diameter filters then add step-up rings to their lenses allowing for fast and relatively easy lens and filter swapping.

Some add Xume System magnetic lens adapters and filter holders for greater safety and speed when swapping variable or fixed ND filters.

One thing to bear in mind when shooting video outdoors on sunny days is that variable NDs with maximum densities of 6 stops may be inadequate, so please consider variable NDs with higher density values such as the Aurora-Aperture or SLR Magic products in the list at the bottom of this page.

Alternatively, if choosing fixed NDs then space them well and ensure the highest density is 10 or more stops for shooting in bright sun with high ISO sensors, an even more important consideration with Panasonic rumoured soon to be announcing a new low-light version of the GH5 with higher base ISO sensor than the current GH5’s 200 ISO.

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  • Aurora-Aperture PowerXND 2000 Variable Neutral Density 1.2 to 3.3 Filter (4 to 11 Stops)B&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 17mm f/1.2 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 17mm f/1.8 LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 25mm f/1.2 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 25mm f/1.8 LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital ED 45mm f/1.2 PRO LensB&H
  • Olympus M.Zuiko Digital 45mm f/1.8 LensB&H
  • Panasonic Leica DG Summilux 25mm f/1.4 ASPH. LensB&H
  • Sensei Pro Aluminium or Brass Step-Up RingsB&H
  • SLR Magic 82mm Self-Locking Variable Neutral Density 0.4 to 1.8 Filter (1.3 to 6 Stops)B&H
  • SLR Magic 86mm Solid Neutral Density 1.2 Image Enhancer Filter (4 Stop)B&H – add this to the SLR Magic variable ND above to convert its density range to 5.3-10 stops instead of 1.3-6 stops.
  • XUME Lens Adapter and Filter Holder Pro KitB&H